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Thread: Using wire brush after swaging/before brazing

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    Using wire brush after swaging/before brazing

    Does anyone clean the inside of their swaged ends with a wire brush before brazing? Sanding and deburring the male end of pipe are industry standards but it doesn’t seem like there are wire brushes on the market sized for hvac line sets, which makes me think no one really does this step. I’ve only seen it done one time on a brazing tutorial video by Lucas Milhaupt.

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    The copper should be shiny clean on the inside, "never" exposed to ambient air. No need to clean copper that is already clean.
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I'm feelin' a little peculiar.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    The copper should be shiny clean on the inside, "never" exposed to ambient air. No need to clean copper that is already clean.
    But doesn’t it get exposed to ambient air the moment you take off the cover or cut extra tubing off?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    The copper should be shiny clean on the inside, "never" exposed to ambient air. No need to clean copper that is already clean.
    Also, don’t you want to rough it up a little so the braze adheres better to the surface?

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    I have an entire set of brushes for every size acr pipe. 1/4” acr up through 1 1/8. Buy them at Johnstone. They have a blue handle can’t think the brand.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  8. #6
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    Sure, those are common. How about the indside of a swaged fitting?


    Quote Originally Posted by jbhenergy View Post
    I have an entire set of brushes for every size acr pipe. 1/4” acr up through 1 1/8. Buy them at Johnstone. They have a blue handle can’t think the brand.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I'm feelin' a little peculiar.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    Sure, those are common. How about the indside of a swaged fitting?
    What’s the difference between a coupling and a swaged fitting???? They are sized for the female portion of the joint.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Takes quite awhile to oxidize. For example, I do service work. I cut the piece I want from my roll then pull the cap off and stick it back on the roll. A matter of seconds.

    Wait till you see someone braze over heavily oxidized pipe, LOL.

    If it is soft solder or that high content silver solder, then I make every effort to get things clean. It's faster to take the time to clean than to have to it over.


    Quote Originally Posted by PortalKeeper View Post
    But doesn’t it get exposed to ambient air the moment you take off the cover or cut extra tubing off?
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I'm feelin' a little peculiar.

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    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbhenergy View Post
    What’s the difference between a coupling and a swaged fitting???? They are sized for the female portion of the joint.


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    One less chance for a leak.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbhenergy View Post



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Those are MA-Line
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Why is it that those who complain the most contribute the least?
    MONEY CAN'T BUY HAPPINESS. POVERTY CAN'T BUY ANYTHING

  16. #12
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    Oh yeah, I guess so. Never bought any of those brushes. Just wrapped the sand cloth around my Sharpie. Since I'm getting closer to retirement, maybe I should buy some of those brushes. Probably wouldn't want to take the time to run back down to the truck. Roofs bigger than a football field, then all the ladder and stair work, etc . . .


    Quote Originally Posted by jbhenergy View Post
    What’s the difference between a coupling and a swaged fitting???? They are sized for the female portion of the joint.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I'm feelin' a little peculiar.

  17. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbhenergy View Post
    I have an entire set of brushes for every size acr pipe. 1/4” acr up through 1 1/8. Buy them at Johnstone. They have a blue handle can’t think the brand.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Thanks a lot for the recommendation, was looking for this.

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    The type of solder/braze you use determines how critical it is for the copper to be clean. EX: 15% silver brazing rods are much more forgiving than soft solder.

    Having said...it's always best for the copper to be shiny clean, and having some "teeth" from a brush or sand cloth will make the bond stronger.

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    I've heard it called abrade before

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    To clean, To not clean. Soldering everything get cleaned, even the SB#8 solder as it comes off the roll, gets cleaned.

    The brazing and not cleaning (as per some guys) of the copper/fittings is one way to braze. Them guys also say that the 1400*F of the oxy/acet flame burns off any oxidation, so cleaning is -hohum- not required. So then I ask this "where does the burnt off oxidation (now a gas) float around and go to ,to re-condense itself all over again?"

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    You might be surprised what a torch can burn through. Most everything. But that doesn't eliminate the need for
    clean fittings. Called "Best Practice"
    Don't get obsessive about it. Clean the fitting and carry on. It's oxidation on the inside that needs attention attention.

    We only had emery cloth but then Scotch Brite cane along. I even wash dishes with it. I still used emery to remove
    the ridge from the cut or really messed up contamination but emery can leave grit in the fitting.

    On small stuff I find a step drill does a good job on inside ridges. Good ol HF has deals sometimes. They sell some
    w/o the steps, just a taper for real small pipes. A lot better than the reamer on a cutter.

    For out of round pipe I have used a Crescent wrench to round it up again. Adjust it to the size of the pipe and walk it to the end.
    If that makes sense. Line sets often have this out of rd condition.
    Small pipe doesn't always need a fitting. Heat applied can often make an offset and eliminate a fitting. Benders trump fittings.

    That's about all I know.
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