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Thread: ASCO BRAND (TURBO TORCH) AIR ACETYLENE

  1. #1
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    Apr 2018
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    ASCO BRAND (TURBO TORCH) AIR ACETYLENE

    hey guys

    Has anyone used the asco brand air acetylene torch ? I have the turbo torch now and it seems to work fine but my hose is getting to be in tough shape and some one stepped on my torch handle and broke it. Its still working its just getting tired and i seen the asco ones on the tru tech tools website. I am not opposed to trying one but them seem expensive and i wondered if anyone has experience with them or has used both brands and your opinions.

    they seem well built it also says they are compatible with different brands and apparently the flame is supposed to be more pin pointed as the turbo torch seems to heat up alot of the area around it. I have never had a problem with that but you do have to be cautious in certain areas or performing different tasks.

    I like the all brass handle and the spring end hoses seems like a good idea.

    thanks for the input

  2. #2
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    May 2018
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    I have used the Asco and I own a Turbo Torch and normally use Turbotorch or Harris Inferno tips. The Asco rep really talked them up and no doubt they're good, but I can't tell any difference in heating and brazing, so I just stick with what I have. If I needed a new hose, that's what I'd get, I really don''t see any big difference.
    I'm more of a Map Pro SB8 user most of the time, but I do braze a fair amount because it's required in some cases.

  3. #3
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    May 2016
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    Okolona, Mississippi
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    Hamilton HVAC,

    I can't say much for directly comparing the ASCO with the TurboTorch, but I did recently pick up an ASCO and I'm really happy with it. I'm sure you've noticed that there are several variations of kits available on TruTecTools' Website, some with spring hose ends and some without. The kit I bought was the AKJ3-S, and since I wanted as fine a tip as possible, I added the AJ2-T tip.

    The handle is a bit on the bulky side and is rather hefty as well. If I completely had my druthers, it would be slimmer like the medium-duty oxy-acetylene rig that we used in school. The size and weight of the handle aren't really objectionable, though, and they actually add a feeling of quality to the tool. Maybe there's a functional need for such a diameter, or maybe it's simply to match the size of the quick-connect fitting.

    Again, I've not held them side-by-side, and my experience with the ASCO is limited to a matter of minutes. However, the flame of the AJ2-T tip is very "well-behaved," as is the one from the AJ3-T. The AJ5-T that came with the kit had a larger flame than I needed, so I haven't brazed with it. I turned it off soon after igniting it, but for what this is worth, it didn't appear to be "rough" or erratic. Also, I can't say anything about their self-igniting tips, since I don't have a pressing need for that feature. The regulator which comes with the AKJ3-S fits directly on an acetylene "B" cylinder, and there is an adapter available for an MC cylinder as well.

    Incidentally, there is a caddy available for a B cylinder that appears to have several levels of pricing, depending upon its brand. There was one on Amazon for upwards of 100 from TurboTorch, but a Radnor one that seemed to use the same Webpage illustration was available from Airgas for around 45. I went with the Radnor, and it works fine for me. I'd be willing to bet that they're identical except for the label.

    I hope that this is in some way helpful. I can't speak from long-term or daily use of the torch, but at least it feels like it has very good build quality. The valves operate smoothly; the quick-connect fitting functions well, and the spring strain reliefs should contribute to safety and longevity. I don't regret getting one.

    Thanks for reading, and I hope you enjoy whichever one you choose.

  4. #4
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    I wonder how much difference there really is in all the different air/whatever torches. I use air/map a lot with tips from different manufacturers and can't honestly tell any difference. I look the other day to see what tips I have and sure enough one is an Asco. I didn't remember having it and it is a "5" of which I have three, the two other are Harris and TT, and I never pay attention which I use and don't notice a difference.

  5. #5
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    May 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by channellxbob View Post
    I wonder how much difference there really is in all the different air/whatever torches. I use air/map a lot with tips from different manufacturers and can't honestly tell any difference. I look the other day to see what tips I have and sure enough one is an Asco. I didn't remember having it and it is a "5" of which I have three, the two other are Harris and TT, and I never pay attention which I use and don't notice a difference.
    Channellxbob,

    I don't have any means to test this, but a video on YouTube and on the TrueTecTools website implies that the flame from an ASCO tip behaves differently. (I've seen some posts with "link removed" in them, so I don't know if I can include a link to the video.)

    In the video, Kevin Holland demonstrates that he can heat the center tube of a reversing valve to glowing red, then touch both outer tubes with his hand seconds later. He states that normally, a flame applied to the center tube would deflect to either side, heating those tubes as well. He characterizes the flame from an ASCO as "...defined, concentrated heat...," and says that the tip of the cone is held stationary on one side of the tubing for about 20 seconds to heat it to a glow.

    What I don't know is whether the cooler parts of the flame from an ASCO torch "wrap" differently around the pipe, somehow more closely following its contour than those of a flame from another brand of tip. Since you have tips in the same size from several manufacturers, you might be in a good position to test that, if you're curious. It might be in another ASCO video, but I think I recall some mention that their torches are to be operated with the acetylene flowing "wide open." One of their claims is that their tips don't get hot if operated properly, and I'm assuming this is accomplished by having enough flow to "lift" the flame from the torch tip. Personally, I'd be curious to know whether the tips from other manufacturers remain as cool as the ASCO at the same settings.
    “Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around.”
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  6. #6
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    I saw that same demo in person. All I can say is that I can see no difference between my #5 Asco and a #5 TurboTorch tips. I would say the demo is proper torch tip selection, adjustment, and flame use more so than any big difference in tips. I don't claim to be an expert, but from using them side by side, I can't see any real difference.
    Don't get me wrong, Asco makes good stuff, I'm just not sure it's anything new & improved. I'm equally sure they say it is. If I were buying a new torch, I'd probably go with the best deal.

  7. #7
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    Jan 2007
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    Got me one of these a little while back. Sometimes when brazing, seems like when torch is upside down, the flame “flutter’s”. Does anyone know why?

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