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Thread: Drain Traps in basement ceiling ???

  1. #1
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    Drain Traps in basement ceiling ???

    My daughter just purchased a small house in the Poconos that has a septic system, The drain traps for kitchen, bath and laundry are located in the ceiling of the basement below the floor joists , I have never seen this setup before. Can this be right? I thought drain traps need to be near the drains, Thanks

  2. #2
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    It is preferable to have the drain traps as close to the fixture as possible, but they will work well downstream as long as there are no pockets upstream. This answer assumes they include cleanouts. Some installs simply trap water to prevent gasses from entering the occupied space. I wouldn't do that but have seen it done.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

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    Poodle Head Mikey is offline Membership Chair/ARP Committee / Professional Member*
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    I am not a plumber but I thought I remembered something about S-traps being at least frowned on - and perhaps banned.

    So . . . to go straight down - rather than into a wall and then down - the P-trap would have to be under the floor.

    Are the basement traps P-traps?

    PHM
    --------


    Quote Originally Posted by Phillylandlord View Post
    My daughter just purchased a small house in the Poconos that has a septic system, The drain traps for kitchen, bath and laundry are located in the ceiling of the basement below the floor joists , I have never seen this setup before. Can this be right? I thought drain traps need to be near the drains, Thanks
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of Thinking

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    I am not a plumber but I thought I remembered something about S-traps being at least frowned on - and perhaps banned.

    So . . . to go straight down - rather than into a wall and then down - the P-trap would have to be under the floor.

    Are the basement traps P-traps?

    PHM
    --------
    I have heard similar stories that water flow will flush the water out of the trap leaving it open to sewer gasses when using S-traps.

    Sent from my ASUS_P00J using Tapatalk

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    Poodle Head Mikey's Avatar
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    Double back-to-back 90's in a drain line will also do it - and so are prohibited.
    PHM
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    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of Thinking

  6. #6
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    Siphoning the trap is velocity dependent and how full the pipe is.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

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    can you estimate the distance between the drains trap?

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    Is there an Air Valve “Bladder,” where the sewage goes out to the Septic Tank? As I’ve seen that in Upstate New York, Summer Cabins. All the traps have drains, for Freeze-Burst Drainage protection. BTW There will be a huge bulge in the pipe, where the Air Valve is located.

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