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Thread: Facts about crimpers

  1. #1
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    Facts about crimpers

    I just want the low down from people who learned HVAC the right way, and know what works, as to the best crimping method. I just bought a pair of yellow linesman from Klein and am having second thoughts. First, do these "non-insulated" crimpers work better or worse than a legit crimping pliars? I have read that the narrow crimpers suck, is that the case with the crimping pliars? I am willing to invest in additional tools if needed to do work the right way. I just don't want to buy junk. P.S. I'd rather avoid the racheting crimpers, but if they are seriously best, so be it. Thanks for your input.

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  3. #2
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    you will find that you need more than one style of crimper. the crimper on your linemans will be the least used probably.

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  5. #3
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    I mainly use my Klein ratcheting crimpers but I cary several types.
    "Is this before or after you fired the parts cannon at it?" - senior tech
    I'm tired of these mediocre "semi flammable" refrigerants. If we're going to do it let's do it right.
    Unless we change direction we are likely to end up where we are going.

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  7. #4
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    Ratcheting crimpers rock! if you don't have a pair, you need to buy some.

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  9. #5
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    Check this out in the tool thread a little off base
    https://hvac-talk.com/vbb/threads/22...ss-of-Ferrules
    Honeywell you can buy better but you cant pay more

    I told my wife when i die to sell my fishing stuff for what its worth not what i told her i paid for it

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  11. #6
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    The best set of crimpers totally depends on the job.

    The crimper feature on a pair of home depot wire strippers will only cause you grief. Or, to be more precise, cause grief to the poor guy who follows behind you, and your crappy loose wires because you used junk tools.

    For the best connections, you need a crimping tool that is easy and quick, and one that you can make consistent solid connections.

    If you are joining something like a 14, or 12 gauge wire, your linesman pliers, or a heavy duty set of needle nose with a crimping feature will work fine.

    For 22 up to 16 gauge wires, a dedicated crimper such a Klein 1005, or similar, normally will fit the job. These are used for crimping spades, forks, butt splices, and similar.

    A dedicated pair of wire strippers are the companion for that pair of crimpers.

    It takes some care at first to learn how to produce consistent crimps, but once you get it, you're off to the races. Once upon a time, this style of crimper was banned on some military bases.

    If you are crimping Cat 5, or maybe a phone cable, a dedicated set of ratcheting crimpers is what you use.

    In this profession, the longer you do it, the more streamlined you will want to keep your tool load.

    You will also want to use the tool that will allow you to be quicker, thus more productive.

    Some youngsters think they need to haul around a full set of nut drivers, and screw drivers, several sets of pliers, an assortment of crimpers, and the list is endless.

    They are worn out simply hauling the load of tools around on the jobsite.

    You'll notice the old guy walking around with a small tool pouch or bag, and inside the bag is every multi-tool he can lay his hands on, and along with that Gerber on his belt, he can get in and out, and be to the

    next job before tool boy has made his third trip back to the truck for the tools he forgot to bring the first trip.

    I'll put my simple little tool bag, my experience, and my efficiency up against tool boy anytime.

  12. #7
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    Apparently I'm a tool boy.
    This is my daily carry crimpers and strippers and cutters that ride in my backpack. There's one more that rides in the truck that I'll go back and get if I need it and I rarely do but when I do I really need it. The other one is a Hilmor that's a lot like the Klein 1005 but I have also modified the front edge of the blades to work for crimping compressor terminals.
    "Is this before or after you fired the parts cannon at it?" - senior tech
    I'm tired of these mediocre "semi flammable" refrigerants. If we're going to do it let's do it right.
    Unless we change direction we are likely to end up where we are going.

  13. #8
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    I first saw what's called automatic wire strippers with aircraft electricians. I bought a pair early on and are by far my #1.
    They are the strippers that have a dye where the wire is placed then the handles are brought together.
    I've like most here have used about every kind but I've found only these that are a pleasure to work with. Not for really big wire
    but no more tugging or twisting a stripper or missing wires.

    Funny story; an electrician that did my intro to the electrical trade showed me his side cutters. He had shorted them somehow
    when cutting a hot wire and blew a hole in the back end. He said it was just right for stripping #14&#12 wires.
    Later I found a company that sold cutters with the hole already there.

    He was the first electrician I knew that usually didn't use a meter. Preferred his fingers. One day though while using his fingers, a cut he
    had on his arm got against a breaker box and he couldn't get off the wire. He was always careful and kept one hand in his pocket
    so not to go thru his heart. It took some time to get off the box. Nothing changed though.
    Give me a relay with big enough contacts, and I'll run the world!

    You can be anything you want......As long as you don't suck at it.

    If a person wants to create a machine that will be more likely to fail...Make it complicated.

    USAF 98 Bomb Wing 1960-66 SMW Lu49

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  15. #9
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    you cannot go wrong with several styles of insulated crimpers, youll always have them when you need them,

  16. #10
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    I have found if the crumpet is on the handle side of the pivot then it is a pain to use and you get less leverage. If the crumpet is on the opposite end from the handles then its easier in every way to use.

    The multipurpose crimpers that are about 1/8 thick stamped steel suck. Any brand.

    I have ratcheting crimpers for some applications and non ratcheting for others. They both have their applications but I prefer the non ratcheting for day to day use.
    Quickly, I must hurry, for there go my people and I am their leader!

  17. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artrose View Post
    The best set of crimpers totally depends on the job.

    The crimper feature on a pair of home depot wire strippers will only cause you grief. Or, to be more precise, cause grief to the poor guy who follows behind you, and your crappy loose wires because you used junk tools.

    For the best connections, you need a crimping tool that is easy and quick, and one that you can make consistent solid connections.

    If you are joining something like a 14, or 12 gauge wire, your linesman pliers, or a heavy duty set of needle nose with a crimping feature will work fine.

    For 22 up to 16 gauge wires, a dedicated crimper such a Klein 1005, or similar, normally will fit the job. These are used for crimping spades, forks, butt splices, and similar.

    A dedicated pair of wire strippers are the companion for that pair of crimpers.

    It takes some care at first to learn how to produce consistent crimps, but once you get it, you're off to the races. Once upon a time, this style of crimper was banned on some military bases.

    If you are crimping Cat 5, or maybe a phone cable, a dedicated set of ratcheting crimpers is what you use.

    In this profession, the longer you do it, the more streamlined you will want to keep your tool load.

    You will also want to use the tool that will allow you to be quicker, thus more productive.

    Some youngsters think they need to haul around a full set of nut drivers, and screw drivers, several sets of pliers, an assortment of crimpers, and the list is endless.

    They are worn out simply hauling the load of tools around on the jobsite.

    You'll notice the old guy walking around with a small tool pouch or bag, and inside the bag is every multi-tool he can lay his hands on, and along with that Gerber on his belt, he can get in and out, and be to the

    next job before tool boy has made his third trip back to the truck for the tools he forgot to bring the first trip.

    I'll put my simple little tool bag, my experience, and my efficiency up against tool boy anytime.
    Im sure RJ45 connectors for cat 5/6 was not the the original intention of the OP. But regarding those connectors, Ive reconsidered making the male plugs and crimping them and instead used keystone jacks and a patch cord.

    Ive read through several past threads on an electrical forum I follow, and field made RJ45 are considered to be the backstabbed receptacle of the data world. Jacks are quicker, more reliable, and patch cords are as cheap as dirt.


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