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Thread: Any reason not to use HH type filter driers in place of regular filter driers?

  1. #1
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    Any reason not to use HH type filter driers in place of regular filter driers?

    Hey there HVAC-talk community!

    Very curious, as the title suggests, is there any reason we shouldn't use Sporlan HH type liquid line filter driers in place of regular filter driers, even on a clean system? My thought process being, for instance, if a sloppy tech introduces a bit of moisture in a system, or doesn't pull a proper evacuation during startup, and small amounts of acid are produced as a result, wouldn't a preexisting HH type drier help prevent acid from building up enough to damage compressor coils? Or at least prolong the compressor's death?

    I work primarily in residential HVAC, and am tired of hearing the 'resi customers don't want to spend money' copout of an explanation.

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    Unless I'm using the filter that comes with the equipment I always use HH because that's just what I stock in my truck.
    I figure if I have any acid or wax to clean up I will already be using the right filter for the job. I don't think the price is that big of a difference for me to worry about.

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  4. #3
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    On the other hand I have heard that the standard Sporlan filters have more water capacity than HH.

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    Install either 16 cu. in. or 30 cu. in. HH Flare LLFD with a bypass. Flare Nuts, 90 Elbows, Tees, Ball Valves w/ Access Ports. Make sure that one Access Port stays on the LLFD side, once you isolate. Add Neutralizer and a Suction Line Filter, if required. You can replace the LLFD and perform Acid Tests weekly, if needed.
    When I worked for The Big Blue J, wed pipe-in LLFD bypasses and add Suction Line Canisters. Wed change the oil and refrigerant too. This was on LC equipment, from Boxcars to Scroll Chillers.


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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    Unless I'm using the filter that comes with the equipment I always use HH because that's just what I stock in my truck.
    I figure if I have any acid or wax to clean up I will already be using the right filter for the job. I don't think the price is that big of a difference for me to worry about.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk
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    This is my thought exactly!
    "I think Quantum tunneling would work great... "

    "Call a technician for God's sake. Or we'll see you on the news or the Dark Side of the Moon."

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  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdrianOmarPerez View Post
    Install either 16 cu. in. or 30 cu. in. HH Flare LLFD with a bypass. Flare Nuts, 90 Elbows, Tees, Ball Valves w/ Access Ports. Make sure that one Access Port stays on the LLFD side, once you isolate. Add Neutralizer and a Suction Line Filter, if required. You can replace the LLFD and perform Acid Tests weekly, if needed.
    When I worked for The Big Blue J, wed pipe-in LLFD bypasses and add Suction Line Canisters. Wed change the oil and refrigerant too. This was on LC equipment, from Boxcars to Scroll Chillers.


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    Might be a little overkill for a standard residential system but I like it.

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  10. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hurst11 View Post
    Might be a little overkill for a standard residential system but I like it.
    One Ball Valve after the LLFD would do. Isolate the CU/OU LL Access Valve, then shut off the new Ball Valve. Replace as the LLFD as needed.


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  12. #8
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    I don't know if there's any reason not to install an HH. However, if the system has a standard drier and some moisture from the start, it shouldn't have the chance to create acid since the drier will remove the moisture pretty quickly....right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by disciple View Post
    I don't know if there's any reason not to install an HH. However, if the system has a standard drier and some moisture from the start, it shouldn't have the chance to create acid since the drier will remove the moisture pretty quickly....right?
    Seems to be the reasoning most manufacturers operate on. I see quite a few 20-30yr old compressors a year with acid burnout tho, and have to wonder if maybe refrigeration oil slowly reacts with moisture collected in the filter drier as it passes thru, eventually causing enough acid build up in the system to kill the compressor?
    Or maybe my hypotheses that moisture is causing the acid build up is wrong. I've noticed hybrid cars that use electric compressors also use a specialized di-electric refrigerant oil... is it possible that regular refrigerant oil isn't completely di-electric and exposed internal coil connections slowly react with the oil, producing acid??

    At any rate, appreciate the feedback, sounds like I'll be switching to 10 or 16 cu/in HH type filter driers on the truck.

  14. #10
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    I just do a proper install, evacuation, and startup. Never have to worry about moisture or acid. I’ve still got hundreds of systems still running fine after 20-30 years. Without any filter! I only install a filter if it comes with the unit.
    If God didn't want us to eat animals... He wouldn't have made them out of MEAT.

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  16. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by GenesisRefrig View Post
    I just do a proper install, evacuation, and startup. Never have to worry about moisture or acid. I’ve still got hundreds of systems still running fine after 20-30 years. Without any filter! I only install a filter if it comes with the unit.
    Right on! Right on!

  17. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by GenesisRefrig View Post
    I just do a proper install, evacuation, and startup. Never have to worry about moisture or acid. Ive still got hundreds of systems still running fine after 20-30 years. Without any filter! I only install a filter if it comes with the unit.
    Same here, but I haven't been in the industry for 30yrs either.
    I maintain several apartment complexes with thru wall ducted Armstrong & ICP a/c & heatpump systems, and have seen over 6 compressor failures in the last year alone on those units. Granted, several of those were caused by remodelers that thought the apartment looked better without a return, and filters that get changed every other time their political party wins an election, but 2 of those were compressor burnouts for no apparent reason, and those were all packaged factory startup units. Making me think even when properly started up, systems can still generate acid.?. Which would make sense if refrigerant oil isn't 100% dielectric...

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    Quote Originally Posted by resolvehvac View Post
    Same here, but I haven't been in the industry for 30yrs either.
    I maintain several apartment complexes with thru wall ducted Armstrong & ICP a/c & heatpump systems, and have seen over 6 compressor failures in the last year alone on those units. Granted, several of those were caused by remodelers that thought the apartment looked better without a return, and filters that get changed every other time their political party wins an election, but 2 of those were compressor burnouts for no apparent reason, and those were all packaged factory startup units. Making me think even when properly started up, systems can still generate acid.?. Which would make sense if refrigerant oil isn't 100% dielectric...
    It doesnt matter how well it was installed, a poorly maintained system will still fail.
    Quickly, I must hurry, for there go my people and I am their leader!

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  20. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by resolvehvac View Post
    Seems to be the reasoning most manufacturers operate on. I see quite a few 20-30yr old compressors a year with acid burnout tho, and have to wonder if maybe refrigeration oil slowly reacts with moisture.
    Overheating the oil will cause acid just as well (sometimes)

    If the outdoor fan motor quits and the customer lets it run for days like this the compressor gets hot as hell , or if the capacitor fails it also gets hot , or a dirty coil

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  22. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by thatguy View Post
    It doesnt matter how well it was installed, a poorly maintained system will still fail.
    It doesn't matter how well it is maintained, a poorly installed system will still fail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BALloyd View Post
    It doesn't matter how well it is maintained, a poorly installed system will still fail.

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
    The odd ones are the poorly installed and poorly maintained ones that run forever.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BALloyd View Post
    It doesn't matter how well it is maintained, a poorly installed system will still fail.

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
    Yep, but in this scenario it will fail much sooner and cause headaches for the whole life of the system.
    Quickly, I must hurry, for there go my people and I am their leader!

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  27. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    The odd ones are the poorly installed and poorly maintained ones that run forever.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk
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    Thats because half the guys out there don't know what there doing and will actually damage the unit. It all starts with a PM or so called tune up.

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  29. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by KB Cool View Post
    Thats because half the guys out there don't know what there doing and will actually damage the unit. It all starts with a PM or so called tune up.
    Ain't that the truth. I see more damage from tenants or homeowners "cleaning" the condenser and from technicians making sloppy repairs than from anything else.

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