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Thread: Best install yet

  1. #41
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    Just curiosity, on your defrost board, there are 5 wire connections.
    I thought we only need two for the contacts and another one for the RV valve?

  2. #42
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    Never mind !

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by UltraCool View Post
    Just curiosity, on your defrost board, there are 5 wire connections.
    I thought we only need two for the contacts and another one for the RV valve?
    Ambient temperature sensor, coil temperature sensor and the fan. . I think.

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  4. #44
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    I also think being an air handler is an advantage on static. Because it already includes the coil.
    Whereas for a furnace, the coil is external, adding another 02-03inWC.

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  6. #45
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    If you put the 3/8 drier in the attic, when its really hot, it will flash to gas and no solid column of liquid to the metering devise.
    "If you can’t describe what you are doing as a process, you don’t know what you are doing." ~ W. Edwards Deming

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  8. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by lions_lair View Post
    If you put the 3/8 drier in the attic, when its really hot, it will flash to gas and no solid column of liquid to the metering devise.
    I would hope I have enough sub cooling to handle that.


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  9. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    I would hope I have enough sub cooling to handle that.


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    Doesn't matter.. unless it's an unusually short line set, in a hot attic, that close to the metering device. It will flash gas, and there's no way it's going to go back to liquid, in that short of distance.
    This is not an everyday occurrence, but on a long line set in an attic, or across a long distance on a roof top, high side should be insulated.. I've never done it. But it it's recommended.

    Sent from my moto g(7) power using Tapatalk
    "If you can’t describe what you are doing as a process, you don’t know what you are doing." ~ W. Edwards Deming

    All those who wander..are not lost.

    Do NOT..mistake my kindness for weakness.

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  10. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by lions_lair View Post
    Doesn't matter.. unless it's an unusually short line set, in a hot attic, that close to the metering device. It will flash gas, and there's no way it's going to go back to liquid, in that short of distance.
    This is not an everyday occurrence, but on a long line set in an attic, or across a long distance on a roof top, high side should be insulated.. I've never done it. But it it's recommended.

    Sent from my moto g(7) power using Tapatalk
    You lose subcooling by: ll pd, ll high ambient exposure, static elevation .
    Line sizing and insulation help the first two. Only way to compensate for elevation is add subcooling.

  11. #49
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    I did have one system, only one in ~40 years, where the liquid line was run through a hot 'attic' and the LL needed to be insulated.

    Here's a funny: The last word in the above sentence was originally typed: Insulted

    Don't remember a LL that needed to be insulted. But it's not likely I would have logged that into my memory banks. LOL
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

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  13. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    I did have one system, only one in ~40 years, where the liquid line was run through a hot 'attic' and the LL needed to be insulated.

    Here's a funny: The last word in the above sentence was originally typed: Insulted

    Don't remember a LL that needed to be insulted. But it's not likely I would have logged that into my memory banks. LOL
    Yeah I have measured the temperature rise from 20 feet in a hot attic and it wasn't measureable.
    I know it can happen but that liquid is moving pretty darn fast to pick up much heat. If it was a smaller unit with a 3/8" liquid line I could see it being more of a problem.
    I've seen some braze joints on liquid lines that needed insulted.

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  15. #51
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    What's with mixing up the red and black wires?

    Looks really clean though.

    -controls tech

  16. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxBurn View Post
    What's with mixing up the red and black wires?

    Looks really clean though.

    -controls tech
    The condensate safety wires are always black.

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  17. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    The condensate safety wires are always black.

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    Oh, so you took black off the strip and went to the float sensor and came back with the black in the background with the two reds? Which presume go to the stat and outside?

    We handle things a little differently when there are controls involved, if float trips and controller goes down that's a whole different problem.

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  19. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxBurn View Post
    Oh, so you took black off the strip and went to the float sensor and came back with the black in the background with the two reds? Which presume go to the stat and outside?

    We handle things a little differently when there are controls involved, if float trips and controller goes down that's a whole different problem.
    Yeah in this case I like the thermostat screen to go blank so that the homeowner has something to tell me that actually means something when they call. When it's one of my installs and they say the screens blank I gear up for a condensate cleaning.
    There are times when I do it different because if I have multiple safeties in series or certain thermostats I don't want to lose power then I will just break the Y call to the outdoor unit.

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  20. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    There are times when I do it different because if I have multiple safeties in series or certain thermostats I don't want to lose power then I will just break the Y call to the outdoor unit.
    Same, but we use a pink wire to indicate something that goes down when a safety trips. We come off the strip red and the first smoke or float sensor transitions to pink before it goes to our controllers equivalent of the RH/RC terminal. Meanwhile the R being red still goes to our controller power.

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