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Thread: FILTER DRIER compensates Vacuum

  1. #1
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    Hmm FILTER DRIER compensates Vacuum

    For a 2 to 3 ton split system, Pulling the Vacuum down to 1500 - 1000 mics and then compensate the moisture with a filter drier or just use the one that already came on the unit.
    Whats wrong with this picture?

  2. #2
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    I view the filter dryer as an insurance policy when it comes to moisture. I don't want it to ever be needed. Its main purpose in my mind is particle removal.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

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  4. #3
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    What do you use to pull a vacuum? Like what hoses, manifold, vacuum manifold, micron gauge?

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

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  6. #4
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    That used to be the standard. Evacuate to below 1000 - valve off - vacuum cannot be over 1500 after a 24 hour test period. That was with mineral oil and real refrigerants though. POE, all the foo-foo-dust refrigerants that come and go, and the infestation of lawyers now, has no doubt made everyone too uncertain about anything that might work.

    What is your point? Time? Maybe I work too slow but I do the piping first and then start the vacuum pump. I use a small one - maybe 2 CFM - and by the time I get all the other work done the microns are generally below 1000. And if not there is another go-to method I fall back on. It's called The Two Beer Test.


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    Quote Originally Posted by AC Hacker View Post
    For a 2 to 3 ton split system, Pulling the Vacuum down to 1500 - 1000 mics and then compensate the moisture with a filter drier or just use the one that already came on the unit.
    Whats wrong with this picture?
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of Thinking

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  8. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    What do you use to pull a vacuum? Like what hoses, manifold, vacuum manifold, micron gauge?

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk
    New Bacoeng 3.5 cfm pump, New Heavy Duty 3/8" Yellow Jacket Charging hose, Yellow jacket core remover tool ,New Yellow Jacket digital micron Gauge.

  9. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    What do you use to pull a vacuum? Like what hoses, manifold, vacuum manifold, micron gauge?

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk
    New Bacoeng 3.5 cfm pump, New Heavy Duty 3/8" Yellow Jacket Charging hose, Yellow jacket core remover tool ,New Yellow Jacket digital micron Gauge.

  10. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    It's called The Two Beer Test.


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    Im Listening...

  11. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by AC Hacker View Post
    New Bacoeng 3.5 cfm pump, New Heavy Duty 3/8" Yellow Jacket Charging hose, Yellow jacket core remover tool ,New Yellow Jacket digital micron Gauge.
    That all sounds decent other than the vacuum pump. I would be skeptical of the vacuum pump but have you tried a blank off test where you just put the micron gauge on the pump and see how fast it pulls down? You should get down to 50 to 75 microns in short order.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    That all sounds decent other than the vacuum pump. I would be skeptical of the vacuum pump but have you tried a blank off test where you just put the micron gauge on the pump and see how fast it pulls down? You should get down to 50 to 75 microns in short order.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk
    Just an intial pull down on a recovery tank to 500 in about 10-15 min.

  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by AC Hacker View Post
    Just an intial pull down on a recovery tank to 500 in about 10-15 min.
    You should test again and also just test the pump with the micron gauge and hose on it if possible.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

  14. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    That used to be the standard. It's called The Two Beer Test.


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    I just tried that, it worked great, downed 2 as fast as I could, and I swear I went from 1400 to 140 mics, Thanks!!

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  16. #12
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    The equipment I work on ...anything over 1,000 microns indicates a leak present....I stick with below 500 microns always to ensure being leak free...

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  18. #13
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    I never walk away from a unit that won't hit 500 microns.

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  20. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    You should test again and also just test the pump with the micron gauge and hose on it if possible.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk
    So I Blank off tested the pump and its bad, I took it apart and found a broken metal shim thing used to cover a burping outlet on top of the cylinder housing. Is this a common part I can purchase anywhere? How do you insert a image in the reply?

  21. #15
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    [IMG]/IMG-4764%20(1).jpg[/IMG]

  22. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AC Hacker View Post
    So I Blank off tested the pump and its bad, I took it apart and found a broken metal shim thing used to cover a burping outlet on top of the cylinder housing. Is this a common part I can purchase anywhere? How do you insert a image in the reply?
    I have no idea. It sounds like a broken valve if I am understanding you correctly. The JB industries pump I use the parts are very available.
    I use Tapatalk to post pictures but I think it's not too hard to post directly on the site I just can't remember how to do it at the moment.
    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

  23. #17
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    Also this is a vane rotary pump right? When you say cylinder are you referring to the rotor?

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

  24. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    Also this is a vane rotary pump right? When you say cylinder are you referring to the rotor?

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    yes a rotary vane.

  25. #19
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    Oh sorry - I thought it was common knowledge here already.

    One time I was working on the long abused and neglected common-areas AC at a hotel. A bunch of those RTU's which have multiple orifice metering instead of the TXV's which would actually work consistently well. Little guys - all under ten tons but A Bunch of them scattered all over the roof.

    The hotel offices are behind the rear wall of the lobby desk. The lobby is expansive and is open-space-concept to a dining room and a bar - which is on a raised platform. Of course no one was interested in any repairs until a Friday afternoon at the end of a week of steaming weather. So I come out of the office with the list of too-warm areas and the head maintenance guy. The bar girls see him and yell over:

    When is our air getting fixed??? We're dying over here!!!

    He yells back: "This is the AC guy right here - he just got here; we're taking care of it right now."

    They are pretty nice looking so I am looking over and grinning and arcing my path over that way - pretending that I can't hear them well.

    "Can you do us first?"
    "Yeah; sure can . . ."
    "Oh; that came out wrong - I meant the air!"
    "Ahhh . . . quick recovery! But I heard you the first time . . . <g> But hell; first things first I guess - wouldn't want you to get even hotter than you are now - let me go see what's up on the roof."

    So my helper (he's become a girl now by the way - but this was before that) and I go up and wander and assess and Maintenance Man Mike shows us the bar units - which is where I start. I forget what we do but something involved like a compressor change or a TXV conversion, and I do some other minor things to the other units - controls, refrigeration, whatever.

    At some point we have a pump running, it's getting late, the sun is well over, it's been a hot bastard of an adventure, so we go downstairs. As an excuse to chat them up I go ask the bar girls how the cooling is feeling. Helper and I sit down and they bring beers. A deep vacuum being critically important and the company more enjoyable there we have a few more.

    Just about then the uncharacteristically working late general manager comes out of his office to leave and happens to see us sitting at the bar as he heads for the lobby exit. He eases over to ambush the slacker AC guys, the girls all tense up, and comes up behind me to ask:

    "So . . . how are we making out with the air conditioning repairs . . . ?"

    "Good; real good. We've made some nice progress, despite what we had to work with up there, so I'd say; pretty darned good. Feels a lot better in here, doesn't it?"

    "Yeah, but what are you doing Here? Why aren't you up on the roof?"

    (I am grinning) "We're testing the roof units. We wouldn't want to just get the units running and then rush off without making sure they are working right - so we're giving it time to make Sure it's right. We've found that the time it takes to drink a couple beers does that - this is the two beer test we're giving it."

    So we all laughed and forever-after that was a standard part of the lexicon: "Giving it the Two Beer Test again, huh?" <g>

    PHM
    --------


    Quote Originally Posted by AC Hacker View Post
    Im Listening...
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of Thinking

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