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Thread: Moving AC unit, needing to run lines outside the house, leaking hazard at joints

  1. #1
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    Moving AC unit, needing to run lines outside the house, leaking hazard at joints

    I am wanting to move my AC unit from the back of my house to the side of my house. My basement is finished so all the lines will need to be ran outside.

    A deck would be built above the lines so they will be covered.

    The lines would come out of the house and go along the side of the for around 13. They will then then 90 degrees and go another 5 feet or so.

    I just had a tech come to my house and he had some concerns about the amount of joints needed and the possibility of them leaking in the future. I believe he said there would be around 9 joints and they would be brazed, not soldiered.

    This is really the only option if we want to move the AC.

    Im hoping someone can give me some insight on this. Is this not worth doing? Is this something that will certainly give me problems down the line?

    Any info you can give me would be appropriated.

  2. #2
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    I have done this many times. If done correctly you should have nothing to worry about. Quality braze joint should never leak.

  3. #3
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    Guessing the Tech. does not have a tube bender? probably can eliminate many braze joint, will have a wider bend, thinking that helps with pressure drops. What size in OD is your vapor/suction line?

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  5. #4
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    And also there are quality benders on the market that may eliminate some joints.
    Doug

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bazooka Joe View Post
    Guessing the Tech. does not have a tube bender? probably can eliminate many braze joint, will have a wider bend, thinking that helps with pressure drops. What size in OD is your vapor/suction line?
    He did say he can use a bender to eliminate a few on that 90 degree turn.

    He said he wasnt trying to talk me out of it or anything, just letting me know leaking can be an issue.

  7. #6
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    This makes me feel much better.

    Im guessing there is a greater chance of a leak than how it is currently set up, but how much more of a chance?

    I just dont want to lock myself into an annual $500 repair because of this.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jpietrasz14 View Post
    This makes me feel much better.

    I’m guessing there is a greater chance of a leak than how it is currently set up, but how much more of a chance?

    I just don’t want to lock myself into an annual $500 repair because of this.
    Hopefully the Tech. actually purges nitrogen at a very low PSI when brazing the joints, and not pretending to even with the tank hooked up, ( such as a empty tank ) and just going through the motion for the customer. I’d use a tube bender whenever and as much as possible,... but hey that’s me..

  9. #8
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    Assuming he does it correctly, is this something youd be comfortable doing to your home?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bazooka Joe View Post
    Hopefully the Tech. actually purges nitrogen at a very low PSI when brazing the joints, and not pretending to even with the tank hooked up, ( such as a empty tank ) and just going through the motion for the customer. I’d use a tube bender whenever and as much as possible,... but hey that’s me..
    Assuming he does it correctly, is this something youd be comfortable with being done at your home?

  11. #10
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    Soft copper
    Tubing bender
    No joints
    Non issue
    Last edited by pecmsg; 04-29-2021 at 05:35 PM.

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  13. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jpietrasz14 View Post


    I just had a tech come to my house and he had some concerns about the amount of joints needed and the possibility of them leaking in the future.

    Any info you can give me would be appropriated.

    He does not sound too confident or experienced in his braze if he say “possibility of “them” leaking in the future” Not one leaking but “them” meaning many.

    Done correctly, they should last the life of the system and then some...

    What refrigerant is your system? R410A or R22?

    Is he talking both lines? Or just the larger insulated line, as the 3/8” liquid line can be done in soft drawn tubing and bends like spaghetti. What’s he using hard drawn rigid tubing on both lines or just the one or soft drawn tubing?

  14. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jpietrasz14 View Post
    Assuming he does it correctly, is this something you’d be comfortable with being done at your home?
    I like using a tube bender whenever possible, less braze joints, less sharper bends. Looks like a plumber water piping when using fittings, especially if it’s hard drawn rigid copper pipe. I like smooth wide bends soft drawn tubing myself. Again less pressure drop, so they told me in Tech. School decades ago. I just don’t like his statement about future leaks potential. It’s one thing if tubing is rubbing against something and develops a rupture leak.

    He should rim out the inside of the tubing where he cuts it, as it decreases the ID tubing a slight tad, where it’s cut. Especially if it’s soft drawn tubing. That falls under good piping practice.

    Hopefully a new drier goes in to replace existing one ( if you have one and it’s located in the liquid line ) some manufacturers install one inside the outdoor unit from the factory.
    Last edited by Bazooka Joe; 04-29-2021 at 05:47 PM.

  15. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bazooka Joe View Post
    I like using a tube bender whenever possible, less braze joints, less sharper bends. Looks like a plumber water piping when using fittings, especially if its hard drawn rigid copper pipe. I like smooth wide bends soft drawn tubing myself. Again less pressure drop, so they told me in Tech. School decades ago. I just dont like his statement about future leaks potential. Its one thing if tubing is rubbing against something and develops a rupture leak.

    He should rim out the inside of the tubing where he cuts it, as it decreases the ID tubing a slight tad, where its cut. Especially if its soft drawn tubing. That falls under good piping practice.

    Hopefully a new drier goes in to replace existing one ( if you have one and its located in the liquid line ) some manufacturers install one inside the outdoor unit from the factory.
    It's possible that he was taught that braze joints were more likely to leak. I was taught that when I started out. I shouldn't learned that a good brace is as strong or stronger than the pipe so I don't worry about it anymore although I try to avoid fittings and braze joints just because I don't like the look of them.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

  16. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    It's possible that he was taught that braze joints were more likely to leak. I was taught that when I started out. I shouldn't learned that a good brace is as strong or stronger than the pipe so I don't worry about it anymore although I try to avoid fittings and braze joints just because I don't like the look of them.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

    I just don’t like the looks when hard drawn tubing is used and 90 degree elbows, and all that brazing everywhere even if they are long radius ells. They look like a plumber water piping with all those 90’s and hard drawn tubing. I was taught that there is less pressure drop with a wide sweep like from a tube bender 90, and 45’s Then they run the liquid line ( 3/8” ) in hard drawn with those 90. I’m a soft drawn tubing, bender type of guy and try to use 45 degree bends also...lol manual hand bending the liquid line, and straightening it by hand. I get it others do things differently, especially Commercial, but Residential......That’s just me....and my worth.

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  18. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    It's possible that he was taught that braze joints were more likely to leak. I was taught that when I started out. I shouldn't learned that a good brace is as strong or stronger than the pipe so I don't worry about it anymore although I try to avoid fittings and braze joints just because I don't like the look of them.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk
    Would you feel comfortable with the process if you were me?

    If it were to leak, is it something that might happen 10 years down the road or potentially every year?

  19. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jpietrasz14 View Post
    Would you feel comfortable with the process if you were me?

    If it were to leak, is it something that might happen 10 years down the road or potentially every year?
    If you or they are that concerned Just run the tubing in Soft copper.

  20. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jpietrasz14 View Post
    Would you feel comfortable with the process if you were me?

    If it were to leak, is it something that might happen 10 years down the road or potentially every year?
    They should not leak period


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  22. #18
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    A properly brazed joint is the last place you'll ever have a leak.
    And anyone in this trade should be able to braze a fitting.
    I'd be perfectly comfortable doing this on my own house.
    You don't squat with your spurs on.
    And you NEVER put the torches away before pressure testing.

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  24. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jpietrasz14 View Post
    Would you feel comfortable with the process if you were me?

    If it were to leak, is it something that might happen 10 years down the road or potentially every year?
    I know my braze joints don't leak so I would not worry about it at all. I would want the insulation protected to prevent damage from sun and animals though.
    It would only leak out every year if the leak was not fixed.
    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

  25. #20
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    You need a new tech if he is so unsure of his brazing.

    As mentioned, if properly done, those joints should never leak.

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk

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