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Thread: Round duct installation

  1. #1
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    Round duct installation

    Besides spiral, anyone ever do an entire system in round pipe? Guy wants it done cheap and probably save him if we do it all with round trunk and short flex runs


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  2. #2
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    I do 95% of my attic jobs in round pipe. Works great, easy to seal, insulate, can be installed by one person easily 5 at a time. Fittings are easily bought at the supply house, take offs 90s etc and its versatile. Some guys say its hack or whatever but Ive noticed its always the guys that own a fab shop......

    I think its a no brainer, seems to work great and looks nice when all wrapped up as well.


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  4. #3
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    How can a hard pipe job even be considered hack. It couldnt be anything farther from a hack job Surely they dont think flex is better than hard pipe. Maybe Im misunderstanding?

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  6. #4
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    I dont hard pipe the whole job, I do regular square plenums, and depending on what kind of SP the units run well at I either make my plenum square to round or take off the side of plenum to my round size. I run all round trunk sized through Wrightsoft and then saddle taps and flex off the trunk as long as its within 15 or so of the boot. I typically use MV registers with elbows on them. I think doing the whole job in hard pipe is overkill unless you need to make a long run off the trunk or something.


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  7. #5
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  9. #6
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    Like others have said, round hard pipe is better than flex, now for sound use short flex runs to the boot. They even have mastic tape now, works great and none gets on me, and use bubble wrap insulation, you can wrap it with an air gap to get better R value...
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  10. #7
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    Im not sure the question here?

    Typically you only go to custom/prefab square pipe due to space constraints.

    Cant always fit a 20 round in a space.


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  11. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artietech View Post
    Like others have said, round hard pipe is better than flex, now for sound use short flex runs to the boot. They even have mastic tape now, works great and none gets on me, and use bubble wrap insulation, you can wrap it with an air gap to get better R value...
    The bubble we use is rated R-8 with the air strips. Works great and not as much complaining by the apprentices.


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  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlanesey View Post



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    Are those chunks of plywood permanent for duct support? Are they physically attached to the duct?


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  13. #10
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    Round duct installation

    Quote Originally Posted by heatingman View Post
    Are those chunks of plywood permanent for duct support? Are they physically attached to the duct?


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    Blown in insulation after us, plywood works good, we nail off a 2x4 parallel at the base so its strong. I usually run some webbing over the top back to the board as well and cut arcs in them to better fit the pipe. This one was getting a 12 wall in front of it straight back to the plenum to accommodate the blown in.

    Sometimes I use wire and cinches and hang from the rafters. Every job is different though, whats your go to for supporting round pipe? Im here for the knowledge.


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    Last edited by jlanesey; 04-10-2021 at 06:59 AM.

  14. #11
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    Nothing wrong with the method you used for the application you described.

    I usually hang it. Im not in a super humid area, so I use 1.25 - 1.5 wide or so metal band comes in 100 ft length, or drive cleat in residential. In commercial usually I use wire rope and gripples these days, or for heavy duct all thread and strut. But Im not a daily duct installer. Im a pipefitter by trade. So there is a different union for ductwork. But in previous life I did a fair amount of sheetmetal. These days its for myself, or simple change out/repair stuff.

    This was a used furnace I put in my garage. 100 percent hard piped. If I was not in such a hurry to get the knee wall up and ready for drywall, I would have insulated during the install. Now I have to do it post drywall. You can see some of the banding I used in the photo.






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  15. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by heatingman View Post
    Nothing wrong with the method you used for the application you described.

    I usually hang it. Im not in a super humid area, so I use 1.25 - 1.5 wide or so metal band comes in 100 ft length, or drive cleat in residential. In commercial usually I use wire rope and gripples these days, or for heavy duct all thread and strut. But Im not a daily duct installer. Im a pipefitter by trade. So there is a different union for ductwork. But in previous life I did a fair amount of sheetmetal. These days its for myself, or simple change out/repair stuff.

    This was a used furnace I put in my garage. 100 percent hard piped. If I was not in such a hurry to get the knee wall up and ready for drywall, I would have insulated during the install. Now I have to do it post drywall. You can see some of the banding I used in the photo.






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    Looks nice but Im glad it aint me thats gotta insulate that after the rock is up and its hard to get in there and work. Much easier to do it now since you could do some of it by reaching through the wall but ya gotta do what ya gotta do. 👍🏻

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  17. #13
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    Well these are some nice pics. I was going down the road that one needs square duct to get through joist spaces and such (from basement). But from a view of an attic job, round looks good. Correct size is what matters the most, second: get a tinner not a fitter (I hate sheet metal)
    " The more I learn the more I realize how much I don't know"

  18. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by heatingman View Post
    Nothing wrong with the method you used for the application you described.

    I usually hang it. Im not in a super humid area, so I use 1.25 - 1.5 wide or so metal band comes in 100 ft length, or drive cleat in residential. In commercial usually I use wire rope and gripples these days, or for heavy duct all thread and strut. But Im not a daily duct installer. Im a pipefitter by trade. So there is a different union for ductwork. But in previous life I did a fair amount of sheetmetal. These days its for myself, or simple change out/repair stuff.

    This was a used furnace I put in my garage. 100 percent hard piped. If I was not in such a hurry to get the knee wall up and ready for drywall, I would have insulated during the install. Now I have to do it post drywall. You can see some of the banding I used in the photo.






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    Just cut a vent in behind the knee wall and make it a conditioned space. No pipe insulation necessary.
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  19. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by doc havoc View Post
    Just cut a vent in behind the knee wall and make it a conditioned space. No pipe insulation necessary.
    That was the original plan, I already have a vent cut in, which is closed.

    The other issue is in heating, all the surface area of piping is like a giant radiator. Over heats the 2nd floor.


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  20. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by heatingman View Post
    Nothing wrong with the method you used for the application you described.

    I usually hang it. Im not in a super humid area, so I use 1.25 - 1.5 wide or so metal band comes in 100 ft length, or drive cleat in residential. In commercial usually I use wire rope and gripples these days, or for heavy duct all thread and strut. But Im not a daily duct installer. Im a pipefitter by trade. So there is a different union for ductwork. But in previous life I did a fair amount of sheetmetal. These days its for myself, or simple change out/repair stuff.

    This was a used furnace I put in my garage. 100 percent hard piped. If I was not in such a hurry to get the knee wall up and ready for drywall, I would have insulated during the install. Now I have to do it post drywall. You can see some of the banding I used in the photo.






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    That looks very nice. If only the majority of workers would do such top-tier work.


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