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Thread: "Lightly Buried" Refrigerant Lines in a Dry Climate: How Long Till They Fail?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    I regards to underground water lines it's typically K copper vs L copper which has a lighter wall.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Tyler, Tx
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    Most I have seen around here fail. I replace one that a tree root, form a tree 20 feet away, broke the line. I have seen tree roots break the gas pipe, that was black iron, and the tree was a shrub....I always recommend against it, but the owners choice
    Philippians 4:13
    I can do all things in him that strengthen me.
    Apostle Paul inspired by GOD.

  3. #23
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    Oct 2016
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    Dont know for sure but I would think the lines would last twenty more years.

    This reminded me of something I saw 30 years ago. No cooling at a historic museum type house. Flat system...would put n2 in and it would leak right out fast. The lines went under ground and ran a long way to the old house. Id blow it up and by the time I got to the indoor unit all the pressure was gone. Finally Noticed a big old bag of fertilizer sitting on the ground next to where the pipes went underground was moving when I hit the n2. Copper pipes dont like fertilizer, lol.

  4. #24
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    Mar 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacob-k View Post
    The couple that I have ran into it sure seemed the ground was actually changing the temp of the refrigerant lines. Sub-cool and Super-heat were way off.

    I found another one that ran through PVC and the PVC filled up with water. Again, it was a pita to charge. Its been some years but I'm pretty sure on that one I had to put temp probes in supply and return and charge by temp split...
    They always run low suction pressure

  5. #25
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    Apr 2020
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacob-k View Post
    I found another one that ran through PVC and the PVC filled up with water. Again, it was a pita to charge. Its been some years but I'm pretty sure on that one I had to put temp probes in supply and return and charge by temp split...
    Pvc should be sloped, self draining, and use dry wells where applicable.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Southold, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by ehsx View Post
    Pvc should be sloped, self draining, and use dry wells where applicable.
    I've berried line sets in perforated drain tubing so any condensation could drain. Made the system a pump down to prevent the suction line form condensing and having the compressor take a slug of liquid.

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