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Thread: Let's talk Roto Hammers and Coring bits

  1. #1
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    Let's talk Roto Hammers and Coring bits

    I am taking a break from a nasty 18" crawlspace today, so I have some time to discuss some things I have been putting off.

    For a while now, when I need to core a 2" or 3" hole, I just rent what I need. But, I really need to buy me a setup.

    I looked at the Bosch 1 5/8" SDS Max on Home Depot online. I can get the roto hammer and a 2 5/8" coring bit for 729.00 delivered on Thursday.

    Should I pull the plug and just get it? Or are there better deals/hammers out there I should be looking at?
    "Life, Liberty, and Levin!"

  2. #2
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    I use a M18 SDS roto hammer for my smaller holes. It does a good job for when I need to install anchors.

    For larger holes I use a corded SDS max drill and a Bosch 2 1/2 diamond roto bit. I used mine last month and I got through 12 inches of concrete in about 25 minutes. These bits can be had for around 200 bucks and the advantage is you won't need water to keep your tool from overheating. The core bits can overheat and chip fast if you don't use enough water. But of course the one advantage to core bits is they'll go right through steel rebar.

    Do what's right for you........

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  4. #3
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by James Colver View Post
    I use a M18 SDS roto hammer for my smaller holes. It does a good job for when I need to install anchors.

    For larger holes I use a corded SDS max drill and a Bosch 2 1/2 diamond roto bit. I used mine last month and I got through 12 inches of concrete in about 25 minutes. These bits can be had for around 200 bucks and the advantage is you won't need water to keep your tool from overheating. The core bits can overheat and chip fast if you don't use enough water. But of course the one advantage to core bits is they'll go right through steel rebar.

    Do what's right for you........
    I have used these bits hundreds of times over the years and they do fine without water, and they last a while....129.00 bucks... Not sure I need to go real serious with Diamond bits and the like. Very rarely do I do anything that has rebar in it, or maybe I just get lucky a lot . 99.9% of my holes are for linesets, occasionally a vent pipe, occasionally a gas pipe.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=bosc...75383079187486
    "Life, Liberty, and Levin!"

  5. #4
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    I'm running a Milwaukee 1 3/4 I can't remember what core bits I'm using but I think Hilti. I considered going M18 but I'm the kind of guy that shows up to a job with a dozen batteries and they are all dead. The drill itself is a little bit overkill but there is no substitute for power when you need it.

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  7. #5
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    If you do enough larger holes during the year...you might want to consider a wet core drill. No dust and pretty quick to set up and drill.

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk

  8. #6
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    We contract it out usually, especially in commercial floor applications.

    They bring out a scanner and check for rebar, pipe, conduit, and post tension cables prior to coring.

    For the occasional need one small hole, I usually just use a 1/4 or 1/2 bit drill a bunch of holes around the perimeter and punch out the middle.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  10. #7
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    Yeah commercial is a different story. Definitely need it scanned. Don't need to be on the hook when you cut through conduit etc

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk

  11. #8
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    I tend to use a m18 sds plus 90% of the time. The other 10% is a corded Milwaukee sds max. I do have 2⁹/⁶" bit. Works great on everything so far. We did just buy a whole set up off a guy for $900. Core drill, stand, corded sds plus, tank set up to supply water, bits from 1"-6". I want to use it but at the same time I don't.

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

  12. #9
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    I have a corded Harbor Freight SDS plus which works fine for me - I don't drill into masonry often.

  13. #10
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    You could always use this method..........
    https://youtu.be/rUKTIt5GQrM
    NOT!!!
    Eric

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