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Thread: On average, how much revenue should a service guy pull in per day.

  1. #21
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    Depends on where your located geographically. I live on a small beach with high salt spray that rusts out 9/10 heat pumps within 10 years and causes them to leak. Trane is the big player near me and very seldom are not covered by 10 year parts warranty. So us service technicians are brazing in replacement parts every day. I started HVAC in NY and usually all service calls weren’t as severe as I see down where I am now. Contactors and capacitors in the summer, and flame sensors and oil Nozzles in the winter. Now I’m replacing compressors, outdoor coils, mufflers etc on a regular basis which of course have higher profitability then most residential repairs.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by JehanDM View Post
    It's all good stuff. The fact of the matter is that's what my company is looking for. I really switched over to service to learn more of the technical side. I think the issue is that it cost money to train someoneone how to change out a compressor but it only takes a week to teach someone how to sell a furnace. Thanks for the tips guys because in all honesty I'm getting a little to focused on bringing in money. The way I look at it is if I'm a good earner, down the line when I say I want to ride along on that compressor change out and learn they'll let me. Once they know I can earn they'll give me what I want essentially. There is only so much I can learn from a textbook and I'm one of those guys who need to be babysat two or three times before I can A to Z it on my own. They don't make money off that. But one of the reason I've got into the trades is because my generation is scared of it, and really I find it hard to get fired from anywhere, and they need to fight to get help. If I want to keep moving forward I need to learn how to do these things.
    Whatever you do, maintain your principles.

    There is a severe non-monitary cost imposed on you by "learning to sell"

    Keep that in mind.

    Never make it seem like an option is an obligation. Either you to a customer, or company to you.




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  3. #23
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    Goettl is in OC and LA as well. When I worked up there I'd hear their ads. According to them if your unit is over 11 years old its time to replace it.

    Quote Originally Posted by AdrianOmarPerez View Post
    Is this a Resi company? It seems the company is focused primarily on sales (NOT in the sense of an Equipment sale). The Maintenance Agreement tracking seems to solidify this. As I’m understanding, you sold new or renewal MA’s to clients 67% of the time.
    Here’s a “complaint” letter from a customer of Goettl’s. They are one of the 3 largest, if NOT the largest, in Arizona. The customer couldN’T be happier with their two 4TR split systems which costed him $40K.




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  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JehanDM View Post
    It's all good stuff. The fact of the matter is that's what my company is looking for. I really switched over to service to learn more of the technical side. I think the issue is that it cost money to train someoneone how to change out a compressor but it only takes a week to teach someone how to sell a furnace. Thanks for the tips guys because in all honesty I'm getting a little to focused on bringing in money. The way I look at it is if I'm a good earner, down the line when I say I want to ride along on that compressor change out and learn they'll let me. Once they know I can earn they'll give me what I want essentially. There is only so much I can learn from a textbook and I'm one of those guys who need to be babysat two or three times before I can A to Z it on my own. They don't make money off that. But one of the reason I've got into the trades is because my generation is scared of it, and really I find it hard to get fired from anywhere, and they need to fight to get help. If I want to keep moving forward I need to learn how to do these things.
    If they are a sales based company, they likely aren’t doing any compressor change outs.
    And besides that, they likely aren’t diagnosing why the compressor failed in the first place.
    If your ok primary being a salesman, then that’s ok. But keep your principals, don’t sell to sell.
    Have you ever looked into joining your local UA? And being paid to learn.
    Not asking for specifics, but is your pay right now based off of commission?
    Last edited by rider77; 01-16-2021 at 03:55 PM.
    “I haven’t failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” - Thomas Edison

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  5. #25
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    Seems like im going to cap my hourly at about 20 an hour, that's about what I make now. I get various spiffs for IAQ (about 75 on the 1000 give or take). Then 3% on any turnover that sells, and 5% on anything I quote (usually rental properties). From what I understand, pay isn't bad. Just got a 1600 commission two weeks ago. So yeah, seems like it's geared towards sales. I used to make peice rate for running rough ins at about 240 a man day. I still make about the same now all things considered but I'm just not running myself as hard as I used to. I think I'm going to fall in line with what some of the guys with more experience have stated on this form. I have no issue putting the customer first when it counts and I'm just going to learn at my pace.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by JehanDM View Post
    Seems like im going to cap my hourly at about 20 an hour, that's about what I make now. I get various spiffs for IAQ (about 75 on the 1000 give or take). Then 3% on any turnover that sells, and 5% on anything I quote (usually rental properties). From what I understand, pay isn't bad. Just got a 1600 commission two weeks ago. So yeah, seems like it's geared towards sales. I used to make peice rate for running rough ins at about 240 a man day. I still make about the same now all things considered but I'm just not running myself as hard as I used to. I think I'm going to fall in line with what some of the guys with more experience have stated on this form. I have no issue putting the customer first when it counts and I'm just going to learn at my pace.
    Are you saying that union scale in your area tops out at 20 per hour?

    Our 1st year apprentice’s start at nearly that if not more, I dont really keep up.


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  7. #27
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    I came from one of the big companies in town. Spiffs mean you are ripping people off. I got canned for being an install startup guy and not selling enough. There’s two problems in that statement, installers never started up their equipment and they relied on the greenest guy in the company. Secondly problem is the start up guy was expected to sell add ons. These customers generally saw a technician, a sales guy, the install crew and the startup guy. I was expected to push the extras like humidifiers and uv lights, well if the previous 3 guys couldn’t close the deal I decided I wouldn’t try. I milked the job as long as I could and got canned. This company also wanted their customer service reps trying to sell as well. There is no soul in large residential companies.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pnasty View Post
    I came from one of the big companies in town. Spiffs mean you are ripping people off. I got canned for being an install startup guy and not selling enough. There’s two problems in that statement, installers never started up their equipment and they relied on the greenest guy in the company. Secondly problem is the start up guy was expected to sell add ons. These customers generally saw a technician, a sales guy, the install crew and the startup guy. I was expected to push the extras like humidifiers and uv lights, well if the previous 3 guys couldn’t close the deal I decided I wouldn’t try. I milked the job as long as I could and got canned. This company also wanted their customer service reps trying to sell as well. There is no soul in large residential companies.
    Preach it brother 🤣

  9. #29
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    OP, what area are you from?
    And remember, as long as your doing work like this, your experience doesn’t count for much.
    The last company I worked for, had a sales tech get hired on with 12 years experience. Well, in 12 years he’d done nothing but sell. He crashed and burned quick and got fired for not being able to fix anything. As that company didn’t pay commission or offer any incentives for anything. And we were all expected to fix and repair equipment.
    “I haven’t failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” - Thomas Edison

    “It’s not whether you get knocked down, it’s whether you get up.” - Vince Lombardi

    "In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics" - Homer Simpson

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  10. #30
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    Thread Starter
    Philidelphia area

  11. #31
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    First year apprentices in local 420 Philadelphia make around $22.55/hr plus benefits. I think their package is worth $41.20/hr added together.
    And you don’t have to sell anything. And get paid to learn.
    “I haven’t failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” - Thomas Edison

    “It’s not whether you get knocked down, it’s whether you get up.” - Vince Lombardi

    "In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics" - Homer Simpson

    Local 486 Instructor & Service Technician

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  13. #32
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    On average, how much revenue should a service guy pull in per day.

    Quote Originally Posted by JehanDM View Post
    Philidelphia area
    Do you like Resi? Does the company spill over into smaller Light Com?
    To make good money in Resi, it appears, all those companies work on flat-rate and/or commission. There’s guys in Phoenix making $150-$200/yr working at those types of companies - while only ranging from $20-$35/hr.
    Resi companies are rare in the Union setting, that’s usually reserved for Light Com to Applied/Industrial.
    Some guys have a crisis in conscience with the former. Other guys have enjoyed the latter. Shoot, a couple of the Resi juggernaut’s got a charter flight to Atlanta and box tickets to the Super Bowl a few years back.


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  14. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by JehanDM View Post
    Philidelphia area
    Contact your local union. http://www.ua.org/locals

    Also contact Flanagan Mechanical in Phili. Hes a member here.

  15. #34
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    My # is from 2015 when I sold out. It took 5 times base wages to just keep a tech much less make a good profit off of his work. I allways worked & emphazied to do the job right and the money will come. Never pushed my guys to sale other than PM's and those were thier customers from then on. This created a good relationship between my tech & his group of customers. If a unit did need replacing it was usually no hassle getting the lob.
    I firmly believe quality work 1st & you won't have to worry about revenue. It will be there

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  17. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldguy1949 View Post
    My # is from 2015 when I sold out. It took 5 times base wages to just keep a tech much less make a good profit off of his work. I allways worked & emphazied to do the job right and the money will come. Never pushed my guys to sale other than PM's and those were thier customers from then on. This created a good relationship between my tech & his group of customers. If a unit did need replacing it was usually no hassle getting the lob.
    I firmly believe quality work 1st & you won't have to worry about revenue. It will be there
    X2 w/ that line of thinking!

    Field of Dreams Movie, Kevin Costner. "BUILD IT AND THEY WILL COME".

  18. #36
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    Let's assume (!) that you mean how much billed money comes in because of the activity of the tech.

    In this case, the answer is based on the business model under which the tech is working. Is it a residential replacement company? Then the expectation is that you will condemn a sufficient number of units to put you into the upper 50% of the techs in your company. This model does not trouble itself with questions about whether it is ethical to condemn a system because of a defective capacitor. The idea is replace, replace, replace.

    Is the business model based on professionalism and effectiveness in solving the customer's problem without undue expense, as in taking advantage of the customer? Then, your success is based on referrals and a lack of callbacks. You are expected to fully understand the technical challenges, and to work with the customer to determine the customer's best interests for repair or replacement. When you repair, it is an effective repair that restores safe operation, and is reliable at the time of the repair, with information given to the customer about the lifetime of service that is reasonable to expect.

    In commercial, replacement is rarely the option, and callbacks are to be avoided. In that realm, you are often on your own, and you better be able to be safe and effective. What you can bring in is the very last consideration. You find the fault, submit a quote for repair, get approval, order the parts, and execute the approved plan. If you are good, there is no second quote, unless there is a need for the first repair to be completed before the system can be evaluated fully.

    Questions?
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  19. #37
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    A lot of the big companies have went this way. They can track your day and compare to the other techs. If they dont like your numbers you wont last long. It really is a shame because it puts good techs in bad spots trying to do the right thing for the customer but still make the boss happy. You can definitely bring more money home working for the big shops but you may have to compromise your values. I own a small shop and we do well by doing the right thing. We get more repeat customers this way too.

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