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Thread: Daikin Air Monitor

  1. #1
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    Daikin Air Monitor

    I was wondering if I can get any thoughts on this product. Is it unique? I can't find any retail sales on it so I assume it's through a Daikin Dealer only.


    https://daikincomfort.com/daikin-one-home-air-monitor

  2. #2
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    Dec 2015
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    No it is not unique.

    This technology is based on integrated circuit parts and modules from a variety of manufacturers
    Accuracy varies depending the particular implementations used.

    Some (not all) of the implementations are ok to very good for particulates.

    As far as VOCs go its the wild wild west with very little supportive published data. Nevertheless these MOS chips are improving and may provide some idea of trends.
    As far as absolute readings I wouldn't trust them. I've used devices setting side by side that say my air quality wouldn't support life while another says all is good.

    For particulates I use Dylos product.
    For VOCs I use the Temptop M10 but just for relative changes.

    When I need accuracy for VOCs I rent a PID meter or use the services of a lab.

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  4. #3
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    I've used the Daikin monitor, Dylos, and many others.

    Yes it is unique - unlike all other air monitors, this one is installed in the return duct, so it detects mixed air throughout an indoor space. Room monitors are very sensitive to their placement and can be affected simply by breathing too close/proximity to a source of contaminants. The Daikin monitor has an accurate particle sensor similar to Dylos.

    The VOC measurement is used for an indication of whether the air is fresh or stale. This approach works well when the monitor is installed permanently for long periods of time so you can see relative changes. PID is great if you are an industrial hygienist and you need to do a quick spot check report for a client with a precise PPB measurement but not necessary for long-term monitoring of general IAQ.

    I believe the Daikin monitor is dealer only. It has automation to work with the Daikin smart thermostat to turn the HVAC fan on for filtration/ventilation purposes, so takes actions to improve IAQ rather than monitoring only.

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  6. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinIAQ View Post
    I've used the Daikin monitor, Dylos, and many others.

    Yes it is unique - unlike all other air monitors, this one is installed in the return duct, so it detects mixed air throughout an indoor space. Room monitors are very sensitive to their placement and can be affected simply by breathing too close/proximity to a source of contaminants. The Daikin monitor has an accurate particle sensor similar to Dylos.

    The VOC measurement is used for an indication of whether the air is fresh or stale. This approach works well when the monitor is installed permanently for long periods of time so you can see relative changes. PID is great if you are an industrial hygienist and you need to do a quick spot check report for a client with a precise PPB measurement but not necessary for long-term monitoring of general IAQ.

    I believe the Daikin monitor is dealer only. It has automation to work with the Daikin smart thermostat to turn the HVAC fan on for filtration/ventilation purposes, so takes actions to improve IAQ rather than monitoring only.
    Thanks for that. The application of the Daikin tool is unique but the innards are exactly the same as all the consumer based IAQ measurement devices that have hit the market in the last few years.
    A handful of silicon chip manufacturers manufacture these MOS silicon chips to measure VOCs. The data sheets have application notes so even a serious electronic hobbyist can build a VOC meter based on these parts.

    Problems include (1) aging - readouts change as the chip ages without changes in VOC levels. (2) Lack of senstivity (3) lack of characterization - different responses to different VOC without data.
    The trick is to use a device that's got the latest and greatest chip set, but this might entail removing the enclosure and reading the part number off the circuit board.

    Still these devices are getting much better (I think) and I use them for relative readings to test various mitigation techniques.
    I have currently been using a product from Temtop - M10. It's also one of the cheapest devices available. It's hand held with no Bluetooth or Wireless capabilities just and LCD readout. That's all I need.

    The Formaldehyde readouts on these devices is worthless.

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