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Thread: Sharkbite for Refrigeration Lines?

  1. #1
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    Sharkbite for Refrigeration Lines?

    What do y'all think about this?
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Bob Boan


    ​You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.

  2. #2
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    I don’t like change, but I heard of some people using it with success. I’m not sure I would use one but the first step is always the hardest. It’s like my teacher always said “Time is money, everybody wants it done faster!” He was referring to pex and regular shark bites in school though.
    “Happiness can be found, even in the darkest of times, if one only remembers to turn on the light.”
    "Ha! Memory is RAM!"

  3. #3
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    As mentioned by others, those 90 look like they dead head instead of a nice sweep. Don’t know why that is?

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    I will never trust an oring more than a braze. This is exactly the kind of thing that cheap diy hacks have been waiting for. Now they can hook up equipment without even owning a torch...that's going to definitely bring some interesting people out of the woodwork hahaha

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
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    "Call a technician for God's sake. Or we'll see you on the news or the Dark Side of the Moon."

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  6. #5
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    I spent too many years learning how to weld the right way, lol. Besides it will not pass fire code inspections in my areas..

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  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unlimited1 View Post
    I spent too many years learning how to weld the right way, lol. Besides it will not pass fire code inspections in my areas..
    Please elaborate on how it won't pass fire code.
    Bob Boan


    ​You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.

  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobboan View Post
    Please elaborate on how it won't pass fire code.
    If a building goes on fire, the refrigerant is supposed to stay contained...This is why silphos has a high melting point at the connection.. what is the melting point of the connector? Certain refrigerants are flammable..Big Boom!
    Phosgene is deadly also, it can kill firefighters as well..
    Feel free to ask any fire marshal chief you know about building codes...If it’s not OEM it cannot be used...
    Here is an article you might find interesting...
    https://refrigeranthq.com/flammable-...or-two-deaths/

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  11. #8
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    https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/amm...ncy/index.html

    Let’s say it an ammonia system...

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  13. #9
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    Nearly all of the historically used refrigerants were flammable, toxic, or both. Some were also highly reactive, resulting in accidents (e. g., leak, explosion) due to equipment failure, poor maintenance, or human error. The task of finding a nonflammable refrigerant with good stability was given to Thomas Midgley in 1926.

    https://www.epa.gov/snap/refrigerant-safety

  14. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unlimited1 View Post
    If a building goes on fire, the refrigerant is supposed to stay contained...This is why silphos has a high melting point at the connection.. what is the melting point of the connector? Certain refrigerants are flammable..Big Boom!
    Phosgene is deadly also, it can kill firefighters as well..
    Feel free to ask any fire marshal chief you know about building codes...If it’s not OEM it cannot be used...
    Here is an article you might find interesting...
    https://refrigeranthq.com/flammable-...or-two-deaths/
    This article is dealing with the release of propane and butane by two untrained "tech's" in Austrailia. What does that have to do with NC?
    Bob Boan


    ​You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.

  15. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobboan View Post
    This article is dealing with the release of propane and butane by two untrained "tech's" in Austrailia. What does that have to do with NC?
    It was More about the fire hazard of what also exists here..Fire Marshall’s do use examples of worldly events to improve safety here...They don’t want to lose their lives or personnel on scene..they will take all precautions ...A lot of Fire Marshall chiefs have great stories behind all their decisions...you don’t want to disagree with them when their mind is made up...they say I want this.....you comply, lol

  16. #12
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    What is the melting point of those connectors? Is there any continuity across the connector when copper is connected to insure proper grounding in the event of a power surge?

  17. #13
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    I'm not saying I'm for or against the fittings. I asked for opinions. You gave yours and it's welcomed.

    However, you state it as though it's code and law and post articles which don't prove that. If you have an actual code reference, please give it.

    It just talked with my best friend who for over 20 years was on the NC Mechanical board and he says that he's unaware of any code section prohibiting them. If there were one, then it would prevent Zoomlock fittings, schrader valves, rubber flange gaskets or any other such seal.
    Bob Boan


    ​You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.

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  19. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unlimited1 View Post
    It was More about the fire hazard of what also exists here..Fire Marshall’s do use examples of worldly events to improve safety here...They don’t want to lose their lives or personnel on scene..they will take all precautions ...A lot of Fire Marshall chiefs have great stories behind all their decisions...you don’t want to disagree with them when their mind is made up...they say I want this.....you comply, lol
    This is anecdotal. It does nothing to validate your statement that the fittings won't pass inspection.
    Bob Boan


    ​You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.

  20. #15
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    Then you will not mind sending me the info I requested..I will always cover my arse 100 ways to Sunday...

    With the people I know, documentation is everything...and that includes Manufacturer design Engineers ..and Chief Mechanical Inspectors Along with Fire Marshall Chiefs..

    You show me Documented paperwork it’s approved by the manufacturers and Fire Marshall Chiefs And I’ll have nothing More to say...

    And the last question is...How come no HVAC manufacturers are using or endorsing them ??

  21. #16
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    What info? I'm not selling or repping the fittings. I just asked for opinions about them and quite honestly, I'm not impressed with them.

    You are the one that made the statement that they wouldn't pass inspection which means there has to be a section in the code which prohibits them. Where is it?
    Bob Boan


    ​You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.

  22. #17
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    Carrier used a combination compression/ORing type in1970/80’s
    If copper was completely Round or ACR hard copper it worked Ok , probably about 1/2 of them failed , around my area , I had to fix a lot, pain in the butt
    I do not trust shark bites at all and especially in a concealed area where it will drip 💧 for months without being detected

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  24. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasgas View Post
    Carrier used a combination compression/ORing type in1970/80’s
    If copper was completely Round or ACR hard copper it worked Ok , probably about 1/2 of them failed , around my area , I had to fix a lot, pain in the butt
    I do not trust shark bites at all and especially in a concealed area where it will drip �� for months without being detected
    I remember it well. It was called the "Compatible" fitting.
    Bob Boan


    ​You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.

  25. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobboan View Post
    What info? I'm not selling or repping the fittings. I just asked for opinions about them and quite honestly, I'm not impressed with them.

    You are the one that made the statement that they wouldn't pass inspection which means there has to be a section in the code which prohibits them. Where is it?
    As I told you, The Fire Marshall Chiefs will not allow them...I had no documentation for their questions....I found out the hard way when I used shark bite on copper ( pvc not allowed through a fire penetration) condensate runs in a 5 story Multi use building.....shark bite has not been fire rated as per mfg documentation..it cannot be used inside a finished wall as per building codes, like an electrical splice box...

    Without documentation it doesn’t fly...I also learned regular duct (Thinner) cannot be used with a fire damper in the middle through a wall(The documentation was provided by the Damper mfg...), mineral wool has to be used instead of regular brown insulation to fill gaps before fire putty seals the openings..( again manufacturers documentation prevails)

  26. #20
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    To make it simple, I would say you both need documentation. The fitting should have some sort of listing to legitimate. If there is no documentation the Fire guy wins. Still the fire guy needs a code to not allow a fitting if said fitting has documentation.

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