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Thread: Room Air Purifier?

  1. #1
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    Room Air Purifier?

    Hey guys, I was wanting to get some of y'all thoughts on decent room air purifiers. We have a habit of sleeping with a fan running for white noise. I figured instead of running just a regular isolation fan mixing the air up, we could run an air purifier to help filter the air making our IAQ a bit better. Any thoughts is greatly appreciated thanks...

  2. #2
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    They can make a big difference. I wouldn’t hesitate shopping for one but get one that you can easily replace the filters.

  3. #3
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    Done some research and dyson is a great company with hepa filters. Also comes with the app and schedules.

  4. #4
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    If you want the white noise, then an air cleaner can be a good thing. It won't cool you off like a ceiling fan, but it will deliver clean air and provide some white noise.

    Generally speaking, look for a HEPA-based air cleaner and skip the other gimmicks (e.g. ionizer, ozone, cold-plasma, etc). Ignore air cleaners claiming to perform better than HEPA. Even if you could outperform 99.97% efficiency for all sized particles (as a HEPA does), the incremental benefit wouldn't have any clinical significance.

    You could aim to get 5 air changes per hour from the unit. Buy one with a published clean air delivery rate (CADR), typically measured in cfm (cubic feet per minute). Then do the math to see if you get 5 air changes per hour. I can explain the math if people are interested.
    Ian Cull, PE, CIH
    Indoor Science
    Chicago, IL

  5. #5
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    I think this buddy will do his job perfectly!

    The German manufacturer ALLROLL GERMANY GmbH is well known in the market, and its devices are used all over the world.
    ARP-420 H is a fairly large air purifier, 60.3 cm high and 10 kg in weight, but this is compensated by functionality and modern design. Firstly, ARP-420 H - provides 8-stage air purification due to 3 sets of filters: a pre-filter; HEPA filter; activated carbon, zeolite, and cold catalytic filter. As a result - almost complete retention of dust, allergens, pollen, and fine suspended particles, as well as neutralize odors and harmful gases. This air purifier is equipped with an ultraviolet filter and an ionizer, with an additional humidification function.

    Secondly, this device has a high capacity of work СADR 420m3 / hour and, at the same time, is energy efficient. It is able to clean the air in a room up to 50 sq. Thirdly, the ARP-420 H has many additional functions that make it more comfortable to work with: a control panel, a digital panel, a night mode, a four-color air quality indicator, an automatic air purification mode, and a timer, as well as a child lock.

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    Last edited by HeyBob; 03-05-2021 at 09:46 AM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dk74 View Post
    Done some research and dyson is a great company with hepa filters. Also comes with the app and schedules.
    Please tell me more about Dyson - why is this company good?

  7. #7
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    The Dyson is a poor performer.
    The Canadian Broadcasting Network independently tested a number of particulate filters and the Dyson was a sub par.

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/por...lace-1.5900782 a box fan with a duct taped Merv 11 filter.

    A box fan with duct a ducted taped Merv 11 filter was more effective.

    Keep in mind that Particulates are just one components of IAQ. VOCs are not addressed by HEPA filters contrary to many manufacturer claims.
    Many of these devices throw in a thin sheet of carbon and claim VOC reduction. Not so - it takes lbs of carbon,not ozs, to be effective.

    Indoor air quality is totally quantifiable.Without measurements you are flying blind.

  8. #8
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    Indoor air quality starts with a fresh filtered air change in 3-5 hours when occupied. This means that the fresh air is high oxygen like +20% (O2) and from the outside of the home free of common indoor pollutant. Most suggest a minimum of a Merv 13 air filter. As occupants breathe the air, the oxygen is use and CO2 replaces the oxygen. When the oxygen is down to 15%, most occupants will be short of oxygen. Also indoor pollutants buildup to the point that humane health could suffer. Filtering out pollutants is good but does not replace the used oxygen.

    Modern air tight homes in +10 MPH wind and moderate stack effect probably get adequate air change to maintain 17-21% oxygen levels and purge indoor pollutants. During calm winds and reduced stack effect, the natural air rate may decline to a fresh air in +12 hours. Pollutant levels build and oxygen levels may decline to the point that there is significant benefit to provide mechanical filtered fresh air when the home is occupied. A 2,000 sq.ft. home needs 80-100 cfm to purge indoor pollutants and maintain adequate oxygen levels with normal occupancy.

    Many are monitoring CO2 levels as an easy way measure when mechanical fresh air is needed. Outdoor air is 450 PPM CO2 and 20% oxygen. One person in a home getting 60 cfm of fresh air mixed and circulated results in 650 PPM CO2. Activating mechnical filtered fresh air ventilation at 80 cfm in a 2,000 sq.ft. home when ever CO2 exceeds 650 PPM assures adequate fresh air change during calm winds and occupancy to purge indoor air pollutants.

    Also maintain 40%-60%RH to provide comfort and control biological growth. In green grass climate and/or cold dry climates dehumidification or humidification will be require during extreme weather conditions.

    These are basics suggested by ASHRAE/American Medical ASSN.

    Merv 11 air filters are minimum for keeping air handling equipment clean is minimal

    The cost to condition fresh air to typical is less than $350 per year in most climates of the US.

    Hope this helps the discussion.

    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

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