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Thread: Recommendations on Electronic Leak detectors and a Gas detector?

  1. #1
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    Recommendations on Electronic Leak detectors and a Gas detector?

    So Its time for me to buy some tools, the next batch I need are a electronic leak detector and basically a CO or gas meter, I want to be able to detect natural gas leaking from pipes or even CO not drafting properly for hot water tanks.

    Just looking for recommendaitons on good products. Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Amp probe ULD-300
    Is one of my best tools. Freon leaks, water leaks, any type of gas leaks. This is an ultrasonic type detector, so it hears the leak.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  4. #3
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    I have never regretted the Field Piece Heated Diode version. There are times when I think and IR detector would be useful too, but I’ve never pulled the trigger on one.

    The two technologies are worth understanding to figure out what might fit your work situation better.

    I like the ruggedness, long rechargeable battery life, and the long wand extensions for getting the tip into some tight areas. Also, like the charging adapters and stuff too. Very portable and reliable and effective.

    TruTech put a really good video out a while back which compared the two FP versions. It’s worth a look.

    https://youtu.be/XkJW5D4IeSM

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperTech2010 View Post
    Amp probe ULD-300
    Is one of my best tools. Freon leaks, water leaks, any type of gas leaks. This is an ultrasonic type detector, so it hears the leak.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    it'll hear just about any kind of pressurized fluid leak. I have one also.

    for CO, buy yourself a good combustion analyzer. you should have one anyway. I have a bacharach fyrite intech

    https://www.mybacharach.com/product-...e-intech/?ref=
    Nest is POO!!

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  7. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by KeyResults View Post
    I have never regretted the Field Piece Heated Diode version. There are times when I think and IR detector would be useful too, but I’ve never pulled the trigger on one.

    The two technologies are worth understanding to figure out what might fit your work situation better.

    I like the ruggedness, long rechargeable battery life, and the long wand extensions for getting the tip into some tight areas. Also, like the charging adapters and stuff too. Very portable and reliable and effective.

    TruTech put a really good video out a while back which compared the two FP versions. It’s worth a look.

    https://youtu.be/XkJW5D4IeSM
    I have also been happy with getting an fieldpiece slr8. I have found it very sensitive to r410a and have found leaks on r22 systems with it.

  8. #6
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    As far as a combustible gas detector, I got the Accutools EL-320, and was able to detect {something} coming out of our water well that made it scream off the charts, so there's that...

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  10. #7
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    Thread Starter
    Seems like the heated diode would be easier to use.

  11. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by pitbull14218 View Post
    Seems like the heated diode would be easier to use.
    Yup. If you can swing the cost a H10 Professional is the best IMHO.

    I've also got the Fieldpiece SRL8. I'd say its a worthy runner up.

    But I've found leaks with the H10 that the SRL8 didn't pick up. There was a rusty accumulator a few months back. My co worker couldn't find the leak with his Detek Select. He called me because we've added R22 to this unit twice already in 4 years so there was a leak somewhere. I pulled out my H10 first. Took me 2 minutes to find the leak after he spent 3 hours seaching. It was a small leak. He checked again in the spot I picked up the leak and nothing. I pulled out my SRL8 and it beeped just a little bit....sort of.... Tried the H10 again and it screamed.
    “Free men do not ask permission to bear arms.”
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  13. #9
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    Well now I am a two-fisted leak detector owner.

    Turns out you can pick up the Field Piece SRL2K7 IR AND the SRL8 Heated Diode unit for a about the cost of an H-10.

    My parts house doesn’t even stock the H-10 anymore. Or I might have pulled the trigger on that one yesterday.

    I used the IR detector on a 410a job yesterday and it nailed it quickly (evap coil). But, to be fair it was a pretty big leak, anything would’ve found it.

    After playing around with both IR and HD detectors using my own unscientific testing in the garage I like both for different reasons. One thing good about the IR is that the sensor doesn’t loose any sensitivity over time like the HD will. So my procedure will now be to break out the IR first and try and sweep the usual suspect spots. It detects change so by zeroing you can usually get dang close for a visual and bubble confirmation.

    I’ll break out the HD detector where my IR doesn’t pick up the leak or cannot get me close enough to zero in on the exact location. Still not sure if I like the auto zero feature, I’m gonna have to play with manual zero more to decide.
    The thing about HD detectors, ALL of them, the sensor wears with each use. It’s important to understand that and have your reference for sensitivity noted so you can know when it’s time to replace the sensor. If you fire it up a lot, you prolly should keep a spare or two handy.

    A properly working HD detector kicks butt, but I’m liking my IR detector now too. Both are worth owning IMO for resi 410a work. I have not tried them out on any of the replacement gases. I’d be curious if anyone has anything to say about their effectiveness there.

  14. #10
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    I chatted with a sales rep. Inficon is coming out with a new detector soon. Supposed to be better than the D-tek select

  15. #11
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    I started in this trade in the days of the halide torch. About 40 years ago, I got an H10 and I've never found anything that can touch it. I've got an old Tiff for backup, but I can tell you the same story about how other mechanics cheaper detectors could find the leak but the H10 picked it up right away.

    I would even consider anything else.
    Bob Boan


    ​You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.

  16. #12
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    My FP SRL8 has been excellent at picking up 410a, but not so much with R22. Then again, if there's an R22 leak, the age of the equipment and cost of repair will typically result in a system replacement. I rarely look for R22 leaks anymore.
    "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing" Socrates

  17. #13
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    My FP SLR8 is 1 for 2 on leak checks so far. Sucks, one of the last ones I went to check was a 410a, my worker said when he pulled the gauges off the unit as we finished charging the system that it was leaking a little, so we re-seated it and put a brass service port cap with the gasket. Was not able to find a leak, drove me nuts. I had the evap coil all the way out of the case, I pulled the top of the condenser fan, I pulled the compressor blanket off, and couldn't get any hits.

  18. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperTech2010 View Post
    Amp probe ULD-300
    Is one of my best tools. Freon leaks, water leaks, any type of gas leaks. This is an ultrasonic type detector, so it hears the leak.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


    How was experience so far? can it be used for long term use? Is it still a recommended one? Asking because I have found both bad and good reviews regarding this that is confusing me a lot.

  19. #15
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    I don't like leak detectors that automatically zero every so many seconds. I just can't get the hang of it. I like to find a signal, manually zero it and move in closer. There's just too many situations where you get lost and don't know if you've not got a leak or it auto zero'ed. I have had the best luck with heated diode detectors, that's just me and I know others will chime in, and I won't disagree with them. I almost think it's an acquired taste what type you use. For me I have two TIF detectors, a ZX and a zX1, and they've been pretty reliable. Finding a leak is hard enough, that you need to get a detector that you have faith in and learn how to use it effectively. If you work long enough in this field, you'll get all the experience you could ever need at finding leaks, it's just part of the job.
    As to CO, i have two, one is on my Bacharach CA and the other is a TPI handheld analyzer, both work great. As to combustable gas analyzer, I have a Bacharach Leakerator which is older, but will find even a tiny gas leak so I'm happy with it.

  20. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by channellxbob View Post
    I don't like leak detectors that automatically zero every so many seconds. I just can't get the hang of it. I like to find a signal, manually zero it and move in closer. There's just too many situations where you get lost and don't know if you've not got a leak or it auto zero'ed. I have had the best luck with heated diode detectors, that's just me and I know others will chime in, and I won't disagree with them. I almost think it's an acquired taste what type you use. For me I have two TIF detectors, a ZX and a zX1, and they've been pretty reliable. Finding a leak is hard enough, that you need to get a detector that you have faith in and learn how to use it effectively. If you work long enough in this field, you'll get all the experience you could ever need at finding leaks, it's just part of the job.
    As to CO, i have two, one is on my Bacharach CA and the other is a TPI handheld analyzer, both work great. As to combustible gas detector, I have a Bacharach Leakerator which is older, but will find even a tiny gas leak so I'm happy with it.
    No one will chime in, as I also personally know many people around me who are advocate of the same approach!

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