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Thread: UV Lights

  1. #61
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    Apr 2011
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    I was not a fan of UV lights until I installed this new APCO into my own house. I sure won't sell them to anyone unless I feel they do what they are suppose to do. I had a slight dog smell in my home due to having 4 dogs and now with this light its great. I sell lots of them now and all my customers are happy as can be and can actually smell the difference. Triatomic Environmental is the builder of this local product but most all supply houses carry them or call out a local contractor and have them install an APCO for you. Best thing is its made in America. Right down here in south Florida

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    We are thinking about installing a Respicaire UV light for a customer with mold issues @ the evap coil. Does anyone have experience with this particular brand? Opinions are welcome!

  3. #63
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    Aug 2011
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    Lewes, DE
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    Quote Originally Posted by arae0122 View Post
    We are thinking about installing a Respicaire UV light for a customer with mold issues @ the evap coil. Does anyone have experience with this particular brand? Opinions are welcome!
    Almost any uv light will take care of the evap alone... Won't do much for the airstream with out decent power

  4. #64
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    hi guys, we work extensively with second wind and after reading this thread and another one I forwarded him the link and this is the response I got from tom wilson the president of second wind. I personally love their products and have one in my home. I notice a difference and will probably never have a home without one again. I have it installed in the cold are return down leg and have an aprilaire media filter intalled and have never noticed any holes or deterioration.


    “stick lights” as they were called in the first thread are those that are low powered systems like our 24V series which serve the purpose of cleaning the surfaces of A/C coils. Their UV output is low and power draw is low also as the coil is bathed 24/7 in UV light, which even at low levels is sufficient for surface disinfection. The Carrier device mentioned in the thread is industry defined as a “stick light”. These work great when properly used and help with efficiency and preventing surface mold and mildew from growing on the coil.



    A unit like the Second Wind 1000KCS operates at a higher UV output than those systems as it runs a higher powered ballast creating a higher intensity of light to create a field in the ductwork. Our 2000 models is even higher. These intensities provide contaminants with more than just a “tan” as one of the writers put it. The dosage of UV light begins when the pathogen is first exposed to the UV, and until it leaves. UV lamp intensity is rated at a distance of 36” (that’s a 72” total range) that nasties are being bombarded by germicidal light.



    There are many variables to make calculating the UV dose of a contaminant difficult. For this calculation, we expect the return duct to be at a velocity of 3ft per second. Using only the UV rating distance of 36”, the contaminant would be dosed for 2 seconds.



    A kill time for a contaminant is shown here as an example:

    Infectious Hepatitis requires 5800 microwatts seconds/cm squared to achieve a 90% kill rate

    Second Wind 1000KCS lamps each produce 374 microwatts/sq cm at 12” distance. As virus gets closer, intensity increases then decreases as the target moves away from the lamp.



    Total number of seconds for 90% kill = 5800/(374*2) = 7.75 seconds

    In a home, if air circulates at approx 4 changes per hour, the virus would be 90% killed in less than 1 hour



    Second example (2000 series, High Output lamps) with same pathogen:

    2000 series lamps produce 1440 microwatts/sq cm

    Total number of seconds for 90% kill = 5800/(1440*2) = 2 seconds

    In same flow rate, the virus would be 90% killed in first pass of airflow –HARDLY A TAN, it would be DEAD



    The 1000KCS system produces the singlet oxygen that you can smell, knowing it is operating as you note in your testimonial. The singlet oxygen has a life of a couple of seconds where it is attempting to attach itself to carbon based contaminants to further assist their breakdown after it leaves the direct UV contact. Homes with young children or elderly residents or acute breathing problems should not use the 1000KCS. Many of our competitors make similar products to this 20 year technology of Second Wind.



    The 2000 system is one that we sell most often, as it does not produce singlet oxygen but a side effect of that is that you cannot smell its operation as you note in your testimonial. The odor control from this process is created by the titanium catalyst placed near the lamps. When the UV light hits the catalyst in the presence of airflow and humidity we create hydroxyl radicals which are more aggressive than singlet oxygen or ozone, but have an even shorter lifespan. This process attacks off-gasses and odors much quicker and breaks them down. This product is safer for all residents young and old.



    Attached is 3rd party test data from a university in Ontario, Canada that shows how quickly our model 2000 broke down intense presence of different model contaminants (E.coli and toluene). The summary at the beginning of the document expresses that this unit will break down microbes and dramatically reduce VOC’s (off-gases and odors). These tests were conducted in sealed environments that were completely contaminated with the model (imagine putting a Second Wind device in an enclosed box and sealed air system that passed by the UV lamps). The time for complete eradication of the nasty is shown. Our current experiments with this same university will be introducing household levels of contamination showing their breakdown.

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  6. #65
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    Mar 2002
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    Concord, CA
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    In reply to the preceding post:

    Sterilizing the coil might be needed in humid climates. It’s certainly not needed here (a dry climate) in a typical residential application. Regardless of the climate, AFAIK there is no data that shows the true rate of coil contamination or the rate of clinical problems that result from said contamination.

    Assuming a three foot per second velocity for the return highly unrealistic. Three times that is more typical and very likely renders the machine ineffectual.

    Hepatitis as the example bug? It might have been better to pick a bug that’s actually airborne. I suspect fluid, food and fecal bound bugs like the various strains of hepatitis are more easily killed by UV than a bug whose design allows it to survive the bright and dry conditions inherent to being airborne.

    Ignoring the other two bad assumptions for the moment, you’ll never get a 90% kill rate because you won’t circulate all the air four times. Mixing just isn’t that good in most homes and is often terrible.

    Producing highly reactive oxygen, that lasts for up to an hour according to Wiki, sounds like a good way to damage my cells. Get enough of it and the big C may eventually follow. Anything with a warning for the elderly and young should give pause to the rest of us. Just because I can survive a night of heavy drinking that would kill an old timer doesn’t mean it’s good for me in the long run. Just because a heavy concentration of free radicals doesn’t irritate me today doesn’t mean that’s good for me in the long run either.

    In short, (barring new information) coil bound bugs (if they exist in a way that matters) might be killed till the thing wears out. The airborne bugs get a tan. And I (might) get cancer (if I actually spent the money maintaining the thing, which no homeowner I’ve met does).
    Last edited by Irascible; 09-03-2012 at 05:12 PM. Reason: added clarity

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  8. #66
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    Lubbock Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Irascible View Post
    In reply to the preceding post:

    Sterilizing the coil might be needed in humid climates. It’s certainly not needed here (a dry climate) in a typical residential application. Regardless of the climate, AFAIK there is no data that shows the true rate of coil contamination or the rate of clinical problems that result from said contamination.

    Assuming a three foot per second velocity for the return highly unrealistic. Three times that is more typical and very likely renders the machine ineffectual.

    Hepatitis as the example bug? It might have been better to pick a bug that’s actually airborne. I suspect fluid, food and fecal bound bugs like the various strains of hepatitis are more easily killed by UV than a bug whose design allows it to survive the bright and dry conditions inherent to being airborne.

    Ignoring the other two bad assumptions for the moment, you’ll never get a 90% kill rate because you won’t circulate all the air four times. Mixing just isn’t that good in most homes and is often terrible.

    Producing highly reactive oxygen, that lasts for up to an hour according to Wiki, sounds like a good way to damage my cells. Get enough of it and the big C may eventually follow. Anything with a warning for the elderly and young should give pause to the rest of us. Just because I can survive a night of heavy drinking that would kill an old timer doesn’t mean it’s good for me in the long run. Just because a heavy concentration of free radicals doesn’t irritate me today doesn’t mean that’s good for me in the long run either.

    In short, (barring new information) coil bound bugs (if they exist in a way that matters) might be killed till the thing wears out. The airborne bugs get a tan. And I (might) get cancer (if I actually spent the money maintaining the thing, which no homeowner I’ve met does).
    Irascible, well said. At 500 fpm the air is moving 8.3 feet per second. I don't even believe a lite tan was in order. I would like to know where the 5800 micro watts seconds/cm squared came from. According to Kowalski at Penn State that number should be considerably higher.
    The premise of ventilation is that the OA is clean or of sufficient quality to be used for dilution. Traditional ventilation is somewhat being threatened by the fact that the EPA is changing the requirements for outdoor air quality which is creating non-attainment zones in what is now becoming a significant portion of the country. That means that buildings in those areas will need to clean up the OA before they bring it into the building.
    www.genesisair.com
    Genesis Air Inc.

  9. #67
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    710
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    Well said, Ir. Not only is mixing of the air a problem but most particles will not stay in the air long enough to be exposed to the UV light for multiple passes. So only a relatively small percentage of the particles (or bio aerosols as they label them) will receive the tan.

  10. #68
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
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    I bought some UVC compact lamps online and a UVC indicator to confirm I wasnt scammed with just a black light. I installed one in my moms house and it no longer smells luke a cat box. Installed it in my house with an air quality monitor and it always showed improvement.

  11. #69
    Join Date
    Dec 2021
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    9
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    The company I work for sells airscrubber and the seem to do a good job but we’re up in northern Indiana any one else actually use this product just curious

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