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Thread: Tube benders???

  1. #41
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    I have a nice ratchet bender that I like but all I can remember about it right now is that it's in a yellow metal case. <g>

    Try using yours with some Mueller copper tubing and see if you have better results. Streamline is their brand. I think Mueller is the only remaining US copper supplier too. I do know that all other copper varies in quality and often acts oddly when bending and flaring.

    I don't know whether it the forming, or the annealing, or if it's not as pure copper as it used to be - but something is AFU with many coppers these days.

    PHM
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonyac1 View Post
    I have the ratchet tube bender from yellow jacket I purchased about 6 years ago. I don't use it often. The 7/8" and sometimes the 3/4" copper tubing curls up on the Inside of the bend. It makes me want to throw this thing as far as I can throw it. I use a 3 in 1 tube bender for 1/4",5/16",3/8" it bends the pipe nice. I'm looking for a reliable bender for 1/2",5/8",3/4",7/8". I kind of want one set of the same brand so once I learn how to bend it's always the same. Different benders you have to add or subtract for the bend. I was looking into a set from imperial m# 260-fha it's pricey but if it's a good tool I do t mind. I mainly do service here n there I swap out condensers/units. Looking for your input thanks
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of Thinking

  2. #42
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    Feb 2010
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    Black max or hillmore in my opinion is the best I love my Black max!!

  3. #43
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    hilmor stuff seems good so far

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonyac1 View Post
    On the white paper I wrote how far in from each end you need to make a mark. Use a square to make a straight line. For example the 7/8" die you need to measure in from each end 2.5"
    Thank You!

  5. #45
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    Sep 2016
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    +1 for Hilmor.

  6. #46
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    I really like the yellow jacket ratchet benders but have had to replace the 3/4, 7/8 cross bar multiple times. The bolts would strip out rendering it useless. I Have since kept the mandrel better lubricated and it seems to work better.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonyac1 View Post
    Does the hilmor swage tool make a deep swage with the 3/8"? I have the yellow jacket swage tool the lever type I believe it's called. The 3/8" fitting does not make a very deep swage
    I have read that the depth of a proper swage joint should only be 3X the tube wall thickness. I'm trying to locate the reference.
    It's an upside down world we live in.

  8. #48
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    How would that possibly work? For 3/8" copper the socket depth would be 0.090". 0.062" is 1/16" so 0.090" is about 3/32".

    Less than 1/8" socket depth ? <g>

    I don't have any reference for the idea but I have to think that about one-pipe-diameter is more like the right socket depth for a soldered tubing joint.

    PHM
    ------


    Quote Originally Posted by David Goodman View Post
    I have read that the depth of a proper swage joint should only be 3X the tube wall thickness. I'm trying to locate the reference.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of Thinking

  9. #49
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    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of Thinking

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    That isn't the one I read, but it is very similar. I'm still looking. The one I had showed voids from too deep of a socket.
    It's an upside down world we live in.

  11. #51
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    That should read: "voids from poor brazing technique" <g>

    PHM
    ------


    Quote Originally Posted by David Goodman View Post
    That isn't the one I read, but it is very similar. I'm still looking. The one I had showed voids from too deep of a socket.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of Thinking

  12. #52
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    Starting a separate thread on swage fitting depth. The OP's thread was on tubing benders.
    It's an upside down world we live in.

  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonyac1 View Post
    On the white paper I wrote how far in from each end you need to make a mark. Use a square to make a straight line. For example the 7/8" die you need to measure in from each end 2.5"
    Do you have the measurements for the lines on the dies for 5/16 and 1/4?
    Thanks

  14. #54
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    I guess I am not too picky. I have used the Hilmor, yellow jacket and cps black max and I like them all.
    The Hilmor stripped the ratchet.
    The CPS was killed by stupidity and the yellow jacket is the champion. We only got it because it was on sale cheap and when I first saw it I was highly unimpressed with the plastic dies. The first few bends were kinked but I lubed it with a drop of nylog and it has worked perfectly ever since.
    When they first picked it up I asked "you seriously bought that?" And now it is my favorite.
    I don't use or carry fittings I use the bender and either the yellow jacket flare/swage block or the Hilmor hydraulic swage.

    Sent from my "smart" phone using Tapatalk

  15. #55
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    I saw in the "Air Conditioning Today" news paper that yellow jacket just changed to alloy mandrels on their bender. Model# 63325 Deluxe kit has alloy mandrels and the reverse bending attachment.

  16. #56
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    In my opinion if the new mandrels bend as smooth as Hilmor this would put them in the same class as far as quality goes.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

  17. #57
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    I use YJ benders and they work pretty good, 3/4 and 7/8 sometimes have a slight ripple inside of the bend, but I can't imagine it would make any difference in performance.
    As to the Hilmor swage tool, you can get 1/4" adapters for it, I have both 1/4 and 5/16 for work on small units like water coolers. It works well. I wish someone would make a hydraulic swager with a stop so you could not open up copper too much. I sometimes have to open up the male end just a tad to make a good tight fit.

  18. #58
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by channellxbob View Post
    I use YJ benders and they work pretty good, 3/4 and 7/8 sometimes have a slight ripple inside of the bend, but I can't imagine it would make any difference in performance.
    As to the Hilmor swage tool, you can get 1/4" adapters for it, I have both 1/4 and 5/16 for work on small units like water coolers. It works well. I wish someone would make a hydraulic swager with a stop so you could not open up copper too much. I sometimes have to open up the male end just a tad to make a good tight fit.
    As for the stage tool openning the pipe too much. Don’t thread them die, head, or tip what ever it’s called all the way onto the tool. I thread it on then back it off about 2 full turns more or less. Once you get the feel for it. You just don’t screw it on all the way. This way as the cone comes out it can’t open the pipe fully.
    Sent from a mechanical closet!

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