Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 81

Thread: Filter drier

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Damascus MD
    Posts
    6,101
    Post Likes
    install them at the indoor metering device. if it is a heatpump system i also install at indoor unit and start the unit in COOLING mode for 10 minutes to allow the filter drier to catch any left over debris. the reasons why i install them inside are; prevents rust and leaks on drier, catches the junk before it enters TXV screen. also a sight glass after the filter drier is a good idea. i also purge with nitrogen while brazing. if you have been in the trade long enough, you will hear of the service calls that "the txv is bad its only a year old" these jobs usually have the drier at the outdoor unit and no nitrogen was purged when brazing. 9 times out of 10 the txv is clogged and/or the filter drier is clogged but the diagnosis is still a bad TXV

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    682
    Post Likes
    Driers have been installed outside for many, many years. Why change now??? Yeah, it seems logical to install it at the MD, but you are creating extra work of climbing in an attic when it's 105+ outside. (140 plus in attic)

    If you guys change a compressor, do you climb in a scalding hot attic to see if there's a drier?? I don't.

    TXV's go bad when trash gets in them, true! But 90% or so go bad cause of mass production and cheap manufacturing.

    Do us all a favor and put the driers outside... After all, what can break loose in the LL to stop up a drier anyway?
    You're only as good as your customer will allow you to be.........If they want junk, sell them junk, but make your junk look neat!!!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    386
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by superd77 View Post
    Driers have been installed outside for many, many years. Why change now??? Yeah, it seems logical to install it at the MD, but you are creating extra work of climbing in an attic when it's 105+ outside. (140 plus in attic)

    If you guys change a compressor, do you climb in a scalding hot attic to see if there's a drier?? I don't.

    TXV's go bad when trash gets in them, true! But 90% or so go bad cause of mass production and cheap manufacturing.

    Do us all a favor and put the driers outside... After all, what can break loose in the LL to stop up a drier anyway?
    I am inclined to agree with this position especially if the AH is in the attic. The temps will be far greater up there than outside. Plus what percentage of techs will go in the attic to check if there has been a drier installed up there when they have to open a system for some reason? I don't think that number would be high. So do you then end up with 2 driers for the same system? I have seen it happen.

    There are usually only 2 joints between the cu and the ah downstream from the drier if speaking in terms of resi units, one at the drier, one at the ah. I understand the need for close to the ah but I think some logic should be used depending on the application. JMHO
    II Chronicles 7:14 Galatians 2:20 Ephesians 2:8-9

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Greenwood Indiana (Indianapolis)
    Posts
    420
    Post Likes

    Cool

    Back in the early 80's, the drier came loose like a lot of units do now. But installers wouldn't put them on, would "save them for my side jobs", so manufactures started putting them inside the outdoor unit. Is this the best place for it, probably not but its better than not having one at all. I like them outside for serviceability. I know in Florida they rust out from the salty air, but here they don't rust out. Well I have seen some partially on the ground and 25 years old rust through. If the compressor goes bad and needs replaced and the drier is inside, a lot, not all, techs put one outside, now the unit has 2.
    As iron sharpens iron so one man sharpens another Proverbs 27:17 NIV84

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    844
    Post Likes
    The Bryant R-22 cond. units used to come with a copper molecular sieve drier. Never used them, but would use a 083S or an 163S instead.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    oregon
    Posts
    139
    Post Likes
    Not to jack the thread but are there differences in quality of dryers between manufactures? Is it something a homeowner needs to be concerned with if having a dryer replaced?

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    682
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by grizzzlle View Post
    Not to jack the thread but are there differences in quality of dryers between manufactures? Is it something a homeowner needs to be concerned with if having a dryer replaced?
    Nope.
    You're only as good as your customer will allow you to be.........If they want junk, sell them junk, but make your junk look neat!!!

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    59
    Post Likes
    My company installs carrier and Payne units and their dryers also come with the condensing unit but we put our dryer inside near evaporator I was always taught it was so that the dryer will not rust in the weather but there may be other reasons that I don't know about

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    62
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Thanks for all of the responses. This site is great for additional feedback!

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    1,570
    Post Likes
    If you guys change a compressor, do you climb in a scalding hot attic to see if there's a drier?? I don't.


    Yes. I am not only going to climb in the attic and check for a drier, but also check evap coil and air filter for cleanlieness. Afterall, something caused the compressor to fail didn't it. I think the best place for a drier is at (not in) the condenser. It is less likely to get overlooked there and unit can be pumped down to replace it. I know this is residential discussion, but also prefer at condenser on commercial applications so I don't have to worry about halon or fire alarms (I have evacuated a few buildings in the last few years).

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2022
    Posts
    1
    Post Likes
    Heat pump? Metering device at indoor and outdoor unit.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Missouri, USA
    Posts
    3,177
    Post Likes
    Hopefully these people who are too lazy to go in the attic are good a guessing what type of metering device.

  13. Likes R600a liked this post.
  14. #33
    R600a's Avatar
    R600a is offline Professional Member*/Membership Committee
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Hanging out with the mice behind the fridge talking bad about the roaches in the oven.
    Posts
    22,357
    Post Likes
    Hopefully they got it figured out 10 years ago.
    "Is this before or after you fired the parts cannon at it?" - senior tech
    I'm tired of these mediocre "semi flammable" refrigerants. If we're going to do it let's do it right.
    Unless we change direction we are likely to end up where we are going.
    "It's not new, it's better than new!" Maru.

  15. Likes rundawg, Special-K, pecmsg liked this post.
  16. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Medford, N.Y.
    Posts
    10,203
    Post Likes
    I agree w/ those that said it correctly.


    By the book, the LLFD goes in the LL just before the metering devise to protect the metering devise from debris. The LLFD HAS TO BE outside of the AHU simply because there is no room inside the AHU.
    By the book, if everything is done correctly, the pressure drop across the LLFD is minimal, and it SHOULD NOT cause any problems at all
    By the book, if SOLDERING, nitro is a waste of time & $$$ because soldering is heating up the copper below 850*F so there is zero flaking/carbonizing like when BRAZING(above 850*F).
    By the book, there is no moisture at all in the copper, refrigerant, or comp oil.
    By the book, LLFD WILL release moisture(if done correctly WHAT MOISTURE?) The moisture , will get released (if present) when the sunshine strikes the FD body(radiant heat).
    By the book, a SGMI when used gets install right after the LLFD..
    By my book, I use SAE (flare) LLFD , so no torch/fire extinguisher/fire watch is needed.

  17. Likes R600a liked this post.
  18. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    460
    Post Likes
    On the liquid line and easily serviceable is what matters to me, last thing I want to do after changing a compressor on a 100 degree day is climbing to the 130 attic or standing on a 12 foot ladder above a drop ceiling with a torch to change it at the evaporator. If it's there I'll probably cut it out and install the new one closer to the condensing unit.

  19. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Medford, N.Y.
    Posts
    10,203
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by mr_guy View Post
    On the liquid line and easily serviceable is what matters to me, last thing I want to do after changing a compressor on a 100 degree day is climbing to the 130 attic or standing on a 12 foot ladder above a drop ceiling with a torch to change it at the evaporator. If it's there I'll probably cut it out and install the new one closer to the condensing unit.
    I somewhat agree and I somewhat disagree. I ain't no Saint and I ain't no sinner. I have a full 95+% of my LLFD at the Cond Unit for the simplicity of changing out the LLFD, when needed. My decision to "cheat a little" is based on IF THE LL HAS BEEN SUBJECTED TO the remnants of a burn out and crap is in the LL. Or even if the beginning of the oil being compromised has happened. I put in a SLFD based on the same info. Is crap out there in circulation? First and foremost I protect the compressor. 2nd and almost foremost I protect the metering devise. So on a clean but wet system I put the LLFD at the CU. Why not? There is nothing in the clean LL to plug/hurt/contaminate the metering devise. Again,why not?

    Many years ago, a new customer called for help, for no AC cooling. I was the 3rd-4th AC guy there that week. I found compressor valve reed parts plugging the TXV.A new comp had been put into the system a few months earlier. I put a LLFD right at the TXV and a SLFD at the CU. I went back and replaced that SAE LLFD 2 more times and I found metal parts in the replaced FD. I still have that customer.

  20. Likes R600a, mr_guy liked this post.
  21. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Marietta, GA
    Posts
    3,497
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Tech it out View Post
    Most of my work over the years has been service oriented. I have done installs with the school system where I was employed but they were mostly done several years ago before all the refrigerant changes, so most of my experience with installs was on R22 systems and is what my install brain is geared toward thinking of. I agree they should be used on 410a units. I like living in the past sometimes. Life was much simpler then.

    Ameen

  22. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Medford, N.Y.
    Posts
    10,203
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    Hopefully they got it figured out 10 years ago.
    When I 1st read this post I thought "WTH is he talking about?" Then I figured it out around 3am this morning,this is a 10 year old thread. Some people are just naturally slower at some things,lol.

  23. Likes R600a liked this post.
  24. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    24,355
    Post Likes
    Another reason is that they can rust out being by the condenser and start leaking. Especially being made of cheap Chinese alloys these days.

  25. Likes R600a liked this post.
  26. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    460
    Post Likes
    That's a good fix right there! I guess exact location of the drier on the liquid line is never a set thing, it depends on the application or circumstances

    Quote Originally Posted by TechmanTerry View Post
    I somewhat agree and I somewhat disagree. I ain't no Saint and I ain't no sinner. I have a full 95+% of my LLFD at the Cond Unit for the simplicity of changing out the LLFD, when needed. My decision to "cheat a little" is based on IF THE LL HAS BEEN SUBJECTED TO the remnants of a burn out and crap is in the LL. Or even if the beginning of the oil being compromised has happened. I put in a SLFD based on the same info. Is crap out there in circulation? First and foremost I protect the compressor. 2nd and almost foremost I protect the metering devise. So on a clean but wet system I put the LLFD at the CU. Why not? There is nothing in the clean LL to plug/hurt/contaminate the metering devise. Again,why not?

    Many years ago, a new customer called for help, for no AC cooling. I was the 3rd-4th AC guy there that week. I found compressor valve reed parts plugging the TXV.A new comp had been put into the system a few months earlier. I put a LLFD right at the TXV and a SLFD at the CU. I went back and replaced that SAE LLFD 2 more times and I found metal parts in the replaced FD. I still have that customer.
    Last edited by mr_guy; 06-10-2022 at 01:46 PM. Reason: Forgot to quote

  27. Likes ksefan, R600a liked this post.
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •