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  1. #1
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    Standby power draw of Carrier Inifinity Furnace

    Hello all,

    I have a question about how much power the heat pump draws, while in standby mode.

    After much research, I purchased the following equipment:

    * Carrier 4 ton Heat Pump 25HNA9A48
    * Carrier Infinity 95% gas furnace 58MVC100 (100k BTU gas furnace)
    * Honeywell TrueSTEAM whole house humidifier.
    * UV Lights

    I wanted to measure just how much power this setup was consuming. For this test, I unplugged the UV lights and the HoneyWell TrueSTEAM humifier. I wanted to know how much power my Carrier system was drawing. I used T.E.D. energy monitor. The results were somewhat surprising.

    Here are the results:
    1. The Infinity furnace draws 20 Watts during standby.
    2. The Infinity heat pump draws 40 watts during stanby.
    3. The Infinity furnace draws an additional 50 watts, when the fan is on "low" speed. Therefore, when the fan is running the furnace is drawing 70 watts of power.

    Even if I turned the furnace off (with the circuit breaker), the heat pump still drew the same power. Even after the turning the heat pump off and then on (while the furnace was off), made no difference. It still drew 40 watts of power during standby.

    While I was impressed with the furnace. I was disappointed with the heat pump. At 40 watts of standby power, it is drawing 350KWh every year (40 / 1000 * 24 * 365). At my utility rate of 16.4 cents / KWh, that is $56 in electricity it will consume during standby every year. That is just crazy.

    Is this normal?

    Should a heat pump draw this much power during standby?

    Any insight, suggestion, or advise would be appreciated.

    -EasyPrey

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPrey View Post
    Hello all,

    I have a question about how much power the heat pump draws, while in standby mode.

    After much research, I purchased the following equipment:

    * Carrier 4 ton Heat Pump 25HNA9A48
    * Carrier Infinity 95% gas furnace 58MVC100 (100k BTU gas furnace)
    * Honeywell TrueSTEAM whole house humidifier.
    * UV Lights

    I wanted to measure just how much power this setup was consuming. For this test, I unplugged the UV lights and the HoneyWell TrueSTEAM humifier. I wanted to know how much power my Carrier system was drawing. I used T.E.D. energy monitor. The results were somewhat surprising.

    Here are the results:
    1. The Infinity furnace draws 20 Watts during standby.
    2. The Infinity heat pump draws 40 watts during stanby.
    3. The Infinity furnace draws an additional 50 watts, when the fan is on "low" speed. Therefore, when the fan is running the furnace is drawing 70 watts of power.

    Even if I turned the furnace off (with the circuit breaker), the heat pump still drew the same power. Even after the turning the heat pump off and then on (while the furnace was off), made no difference. It still drew 40 watts of power during standby.

    While I was impressed with the furnace. I was disappointed with the heat pump. At 40 watts of standby power, it is drawing 350KWh every year (40 / 1000 * 24 * 365). At my utility rate of 16.4 cents / KWh, that is $56 in electricity it will consume during standby every year. That is just crazy.

    Is this normal?

    Should a heat pump draw this much power during standby?

    Any insight, suggestion, or advise would be appreciated.

    -EasyPrey
    wow, i have never been asked this before and have never thought that much about it. it does seem like alot when it's broke down like that but i have never tested anything to have a referance. i am sure someone here will though.

  3. #3
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    The HP outdoor unit, has a crank case heater.
    Keeps the oil in the compressor warm so the refrigerant doesn't mix in with it. And wash it out when it starts up.

    Most are only energized while the compressor is not running.

    So if you subtract the total number of hours the compressor runs for heating and cooling. You'll find its less money then you came up with.
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  4. #4
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    I would assume also that there is a thermostat on the cranscase heater and it will shut off in warmer temperatures (>55F?) Is that correct?

  5. #5
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    May or may not shut off on that model.
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  6. #6
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by motoguy128 View Post
    I would assume also that there is a thermostat on the cranscase heater and it will shut off in warmer temperatures (>55F?) Is that correct?
    I performed the test when the temperature was in the mid 70s. I believe the coil temperature was 78 degrees. Apparently, this 40 watt standby draw is in effect at all times. I will do another test, when the temperature is at or near freezing.

    What is troubling is that the heat pump is constantly draining 57% of the power to run the main furnace (40 watts Vs 70 watts). That is just insane.

    The Carrier Infinity series supposed to be one of the most energy efficient units. What is scary is just how much Standby power a "contractor grade" unit could siphon of, while in standby.

    -EasyPrey

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPrey View Post
    What is scary is just how much Standby power a "contractor grade" unit could siphon of, while in standby.

    -EasyPrey
    Same amount. For most of them.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPrey View Post
    Hello all,

    I have a question about how much power the heat pump draws, while in standby mode.

    After much research, I purchased the following equipment:

    * Carrier 4 ton Heat Pump 25HNA9A48
    * Carrier Infinity 95% gas furnace 58MVC100 (100k BTU gas furnace)
    * Honeywell TrueSTEAM whole house humidifier.
    * UV Lights

    I wanted to measure just how much power this setup was consuming. For this test, I unplugged the UV lights and the HoneyWell TrueSTEAM humifier. I wanted to know how much power my Carrier system was drawing. I used T.E.D. energy monitor. The results were somewhat surprising.

    Here are the results:
    1. The Infinity furnace draws 20 Watts during standby.
    2. The Infinity heat pump draws 40 watts during stanby.
    3. The Infinity furnace draws an additional 50 watts, when the fan is on "low" speed. Therefore, when the fan is running the furnace is drawing 70 watts of power.

    Even if I turned the furnace off (with the circuit breaker), the heat pump still drew the same power. Even after the turning the heat pump off and then on (while the furnace was off), made no difference. It still drew 40 watts of power during standby.

    While I was impressed with the furnace. I was disappointed with the heat pump. At 40 watts of standby power, it is drawing 350KWh every year (40 / 1000 * 24 * 365). At my utility rate of 16.4 cents / KWh, that is $56 in electricity it will consume during standby every year. That is just crazy.

    Is this normal?

    Should a heat pump draw this much power during standby?

    Any insight, suggestion, or advise would be appreciated.

    -EasyPrey
    How much is your TV or computer using in standby per year?(meaning plugged in, but not turned on) Solid state control board consume electricity, even when not in use. The more you have, the more it consumes.

  9. #9
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    It kinda is what it is. I'm sure Carrier has thought this through and understand how much it uses, its really no surprise to them. I really wouldn't worry about it so much. My best advice is to find something else to do.
    I like DIY'ers. They pay better to fix.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ascj View Post
    How much is your TV or computer using in standby per year?(meaning plugged in, but not turned on) Solid state control board consume electricity, even when not in use. The more you have, the more it consumes.

    That's a good point. I try not to get too paranoid about somewhat "trivial" amounts of energy. Yes 40 Watts is a waste, but my LCD TV and Sattelite system, according to nameplate, consumes about 500 Watts. combined... and the sattelite reciever, being a DVR, consumed almost full power even in "standby mode" I noticed a step increase in my electric bill after getting the new TV.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by motoguy128 View Post
    and the sattelite reciever, being a DVR, consumed almost full power even in "standby mode" I noticed a step increase in my electric bill after getting the new TV.
    A lot of people find out about those things the hard way.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    A lot of people find out about those things the hard way.
    No really complaining myself, just making an obervation about something that's ignorred, unknown, or kept quiet. I find the entertainment value exceeds the extra $15 or so per month I spend in electricity with both DVR's.

    But for those on fixed incomes, it could be significant. A hidden cost on your sattelite or cable bill.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by motoguy128 View Post
    I find the entertainment value exceeds the extra $15 or so per month I spend in electricity with both DVR's.
    Here, some people are going to find that it cost them an extra 22 plus bucks a month, start 2010.
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