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Thread: Add-on Freon pressure switches in split system

  1. #1
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    Add-on Freon pressure switches in split system

    I've a client that we'll be replacing his split system this off-season. He has a bro in the commercial AC world on the other side of the country, and the bro says to him: "Make sure you get pressure switches on the Freon!", so of course that's what he wants. I know the high end machines have them already, but can they be added to machines that don't come with them already installed? I may be having him make a decision between less expensive equipment or getting the pressure switches, but if it's feasible to add them, that will be another option for him.

    I'm thinking they would have to be installed in the lines just outside of the condenser? Would they be reliably leak-free if installed on the Schrader valves, with a T-fitting to preserve the charging ports?

  2. #2
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    That "bro" is absolutely right! Maybe you should consider installing equipment from a manufacturer that actually has the decency to use pressure switches. IMHO pressure switches should not be optional.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
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    "Call a technician for God's sake. Or we'll see you on the news or the Dark Side of the Moon."

  3. #3
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    Just buy one of the brands that has them. We sell Armstrong and they have high and low pressure switches. We sold champion and they had high pressure switches.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

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  5. #4
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    I like pressure switches. I just like to give everyone their options. Thanks for the replies so far.

  6. #5
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    Always added them on on compressor change outs and new equipment. Cheap insurance.

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  8. #6
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    What manufacturer isn't using them these days with R410a ?

  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    What manufacturer isn't using them these days with R410a ?
    Payne for one.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

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  11. #8
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    Lets not forget a CCH.

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  13. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechmanTerry View Post
    Lets not forget a CCH.
    Interesting. Except for some heat pumps, those are practically non existent in southern NV. Why do you recommend one?

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    Don't like starting a compressor with solvent in my lubricant.

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  16. #11
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    Wait, what's a CCH, as used here? Googling it mislead me, I think.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC702 View Post
    Wait, what's a CCH, as used here? Googling it mislead me, I think.
    Crank case heater.
    They warm the oil to drive out the refrigerant.

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  18. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC702 View Post
    Interesting. Except for some heat pumps, those are practically non existent in southern NV. Why do you recommend one?
    Why are CCH almost non-existing in southern NV?

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    Quote Originally Posted by TechmanTerry View Post
    Why are CCH almost non-existing in southern NV?
    I believe a crank case heater reduces the seer rating.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

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  21. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    I believe a crank case heater reduces the seer rating.

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    I like the other part,I believe a CCH reduces the "dead compressor" rating.lol

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  23. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechmanTerry View Post
    I like the other part,I believe a CCH reduces the "dead compressor" rating.lol
    Me too but sadly manufacturers don't care if it makes it out of warranty.

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  24. #17
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    I have often wondered about putting a temperature switch on the CCH to only run it below 80 or something like that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    I have often wondered about putting a temperature switch on the CCH to only run it below 80 or something like that.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk
    Point is to keep the oil temp above saturation at any temperature.

    40-80 watts is not expensive insurance.

    Only times I've see issues is when compressor blankets or sound enclosure are uses causing the motor protection module to fail, typical rating is 150*f max. Also some centrifugal heaters in hot mechanical rooms required addition of thermostat controls.

    Some low ambient application require additional heaters with t'stats or wind baffle (sound) enclosures where the compressors are exposed outdoors.

  26. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    I have often wondered about putting a temperature switch on the CCH to only run it below 80 or something like that.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk
    Trane has a thermostat on the discharge line, it shuts the heater off if the discharge line is so warm. If the line is warm then the compressor is running and should be generating it's own heat.

  27. #20
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    A CCH? At/above/below certain OAT? What about the press diff between the oil in the comp and the refrigerant in the system. Flapping Jaws here, on a 80*F (everything is at 80*F) day the r22 press is 143.6 psi,while the oil surface press is 143.5 psi(Flapping jaws I said). So Mother Nature says "Pressure shall ALWAYS go from high to low". So the 143.6(freon) press jumps into the 143.5 press (oil). Its a Natural Compressor Killer. The CCH raises the oil temp and pressure.

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