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Thread: The HVAC 2.0 sales process

  1. #1
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    The HVAC 2.0 sales process

    I’ve joined a group that’s getting helping me ease the stress about selling.

    The HVAC2.0 sales process. It helps us as HVAC contractors and technicians to widen our view of providing comfort, safety, and performance. And get paid for our knowledge, experience, and design efforts in the bargain. The focus is on the WHOLE house (along with HOLES in the house.)
    We know all too well the importance of such things as a good installation, a designed duct system, and properly sized equipment. But what about the “invisible connection” between the supply and return ducts? This is of course the house and its shell. A leaky house is difficult to make comfortable and what is often done is to install larger equipment to compensate. Even when the ducts are enlarged for the equipment, that’s not necessarily in the customer’s best interests.
    HVAC2.0 let’s us get to the root of what each customer really needs. That is a solution to their problems, not what someone else thinks their problem might be. It starts by offering the customer the choice of a free quote based on the size of their current equipment OR a “comfort consult” for which we get paid, where we learn what bothers them most and what they want to fix. Depending on the interview it may involve a blower door and some investigation with a thermal imaging camera or smoke generator.
    Of course, most will choose a free quote, but that puts the responsibility on them for the outcome of the project. It could be that during the quote process we learn that they have problems that require more attention. The “comfort consult” remains an option for them.
    The HVAC 2.0 sales process works along with an easy software program to interview the homeowners and find out what they really want to solve without selling them anything. Then proposals and budgets can be offered. (There’s where the selling comes in.) The great thing is we don’t spend time designing a proposal for free. There’s a map, “subway map” because that’s what it looks like, for following the process and branches for alternate steps.
    to see “TPIS” on the site which stands for “the process is sacred.” Sticking to it keeps the interview from getting off topic by offering solutions or selling something before the interview is over.
    A weekly Zoom meeting is held for learning
    There is a monthly fee to be in the group, but for something that has provided me this much help for selling and taking the pressure off me, I pay it gladly.
    https://www.hvac20.com/ is a place to look it over.
    There’s also a facebook group for HVAC Advanced Discussion for Comfort Troubleshooters for sharing experiences or asking questions.
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/488241124966443

    Nate Adams has written a book "The Home Comfort Book" and two of the chapters are available for free to give to customers to help them see the complexity of comfort. Nate has been on Bill Spohn's podcast along with Ted Kidd to discuss HVAC 2.0
    The interview process has been designed from many customer interviews and has made it simple. You’re likely
    *********
    https://www.hvac20.com/ High efficiency equipment alone does not provide home comfort and efficiency. HVAC2.0 is a process for finding the real needs of the house and the occupants. Offer the customer a menu of work to address their problems and give them a probability of success.

    Find contractors with specialized training in combustion analysis, residential system performance, air flow, and duct optimization https://www.myhomecomfort.org/


    Site member map HERE!

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  3. #2
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    #TPIS

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/ssQFhKGegxFepNiV8
    Early Adopter round is OPEN - https://www.hvac20.com/earlyadopters.html HVAC 101 free pdf - http://bit.ly/HVAC101File1118

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    #TPIS


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    Always do whats right.

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    #TPIS ��

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  9. #5
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    It's working!


    At this week's Monday Meeting Reedie reported these numbers YTD:

    • Comfort Consult 22 leads, 18 sold, or 81.8% closed at $16k average job size.
    • Regular leads 140, 75 sold 52% closed at $10k average job size.
    • His A path sales average is up $1400 this year. He attributes this increase to Sandler, as the chapters are not sent to A path leads.
    • Reedie thinks if offered to everyone, 30 - 35% of his leads would choose a comfort consult path. But they don't have CSR's following process, and he's often not there to take the calls. It's much harder to convert to a Comfort Consult when you are already at the free quote. He hopes to send an appointment confirmation, a/b offer email to every visit scheduled so the groundwork for conversion can be better laid for him.




    ...and I decided to do some additional math.


    His 18 sold comfort consults generated roughly $288,000.
    If those 22 leads had followed his typical 52% closing, the 11.5 jobs at $10,000 job rate gross revenue would have been $114,000, or $173,000 or 60% less revenue.
    Remove the $1400 Sandler training bump from the 86.5 jobs (75 + 11.5 hypothetical) and you drop gross revenue by another $121,100 year to date, or a total revenue loss of $294,100 for the year.


    So HVAC 2.0 has resulted in ytd sales increase of nearly $300,000 for Reedie.
    Early Adopter round is OPEN - https://www.hvac20.com/earlyadopters.html HVAC 101 free pdf - http://bit.ly/HVAC101File1118

  10. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdean1 View Post
    I’ve joined a group that’s getting helping me ease the stress about selling.

    The HVAC2.0 sales process. It helps us as HVAC contractors and technicians to widen our view of providing comfort, safety, and performance. And get paid for our knowledge, experience, and design efforts in the bargain. The focus is on the WHOLE house (along with HOLES in the house.)
    We know all too well the importance of such things as a good installation, a designed duct system, and properly sized equipment. But what about the “invisible connection” between the supply and return ducts? This is of course the house and its shell. A leaky house is difficult to make comfortable and what is often done is to install larger equipment to compensate. Even when the ducts are enlarged for the equipment, that’s not necessarily in the customer’s best interests.
    HVAC2.0 let’s us get to the root of what each customer really needs. That is a solution to their problems, not what someone else thinks their problem might be. It starts by offering the customer the choice of a free quote based on the size of their current equipment OR a “comfort consult” for which we get paid, where we learn what bothers them most and what they want to fix. Depending on the interview it may involve a blower door and some investigation with a thermal imaging camera or smoke generator.
    Of course, most will choose a free quote, but that puts the responsibility on them for the outcome of the project. It could be that during the quote process we learn that they have problems that require more attention. The “comfort consult” remains an option for them.
    The HVAC 2.0 sales process works along with an easy software program to interview the homeowners and find out what they really want to solve without selling them anything. Then proposals and budgets can be offered. (There’s where the selling comes in.) The great thing is we don’t spend time designing a proposal for free. There’s a map, “subway map” because that’s what it looks like, for following the process and branches for alternate steps.
    to see “TPIS” on the site which stands for “the process is sacred.” Sticking to it keeps the interview from getting off topic by offering solutions or selling something before the interview is over.
    A weekly Zoom meeting is held for learning
    There is a monthly fee to be in the group, but for something that has provided me this much help for selling and taking the pressure off me, I pay it gladly.
    https://www.hvac20.com/ is a place to look it over.
    There’s also a facebook group for HVAC Advanced Discussion for Comfort Troubleshooters for sharing experiences or asking questions.
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/488241124966443

    Nate Adams has written a book "The Home Comfort Book" and two of the chapters are available for free to give to customers to help them see the complexity of comfort. Nate has been on Bill Spohn's podcast along with Ted Kidd to discuss HVAC 2.0
    The interview process has been designed from many customer interviews and has made it simple. You’re likely
    Is this spam?

  11. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deathpunch0311 View Post
    Is this spam?
    If you feel it is, report it and let the mods decide.
    *********
    https://www.hvac20.com/ High efficiency equipment alone does not provide home comfort and efficiency. HVAC2.0 is a process for finding the real needs of the house and the occupants. Offer the customer a menu of work to address their problems and give them a probability of success.

    Find contractors with specialized training in combustion analysis, residential system performance, air flow, and duct optimization https://www.myhomecomfort.org/


    Site member map HERE!

  12. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdean1 View Post
    If you feel it is, report it and let the mods decide.
    I was just asking because Ive never seen you post stuff like this. Then the replies too. If its not spam and its legit, it sounds like a good thing.

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  14. #9
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    Spam or not, this is what Ive been pushing for the past couple years and more HVAC contractors should too. You have to look past the equipment and duct work for solutions if your customer isnt comfortable. Crawlspace encapsulation, attic insulation, new windows, etc. - all that stuff improves IAQ and energy consumption much more than high SEER equipment and UV lights.

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  16. #10
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    I can see why you might get that impression. Nate and Ted are friends of Bill Spohn, and Brian Orr. They’ve been on the podcasts by Brian and Bill if you’d like to listen to the discussions. In fact that’s where I first heard their names and what they do. When I upgraded my DG700 to a DG1000 with TEC, the owner of TEC included a letter acknowledging the program.
    I may have gone overboard with my description but I wanted to convey that it is not some dog and pony show presentation.
    There’s plenty of valid things on Facebook and YouTube to show that HVAC2.0 is not a flash in the pan.
    *********
    https://www.hvac20.com/ High efficiency equipment alone does not provide home comfort and efficiency. HVAC2.0 is a process for finding the real needs of the house and the occupants. Offer the customer a menu of work to address their problems and give them a probability of success.

    Find contractors with specialized training in combustion analysis, residential system performance, air flow, and duct optimization https://www.myhomecomfort.org/


    Site member map HERE!

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  18. #11
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    duplicate...
    Early Adopter round is OPEN - https://www.hvac20.com/earlyadopters.html HVAC 101 free pdf - http://bit.ly/HVAC101File1118

  19. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by CircusEnvy View Post
    Spam or not, this is what I’ve been pushing for the past couple years and more HVAC contractors should too. You have to look past the equipment and duct work for solutions if your customer isn’t comfortable. Crawlspace encapsulation, attic insulation, new windows, etc. - all that stuff improves IAQ and energy consumption much more than high SEER equipment and UV lights.
    Thanks! We agree having a path for contractors to offer to clients is important. Mostly we are about better positioning the contractor to "responsibly avoid responsibility" and think that's accomplished by educating, then offering to take the quick or the thorough path and letting the better informed customer pick which suits them.

    This nicely sets up this response to later complaints that avoids burning up warranty reserves: "You may recall we talked about the Comfort Consult path that helps get a better understanding of those issues? A lot of people do decide to take that path. Sounds like you've decided you'd like us to do that?"

    Joining hvac 2.0 and all features except report creation are free, so not much lost if it's not for you.
    Early Adopter round is OPEN - https://www.hvac20.com/earlyadopters.html

    This is what the report looks like https://bit.ly/TestyMcNormalface
    Early Adopter round is OPEN - https://www.hvac20.com/earlyadopters.html HVAC 101 free pdf - http://bit.ly/HVAC101File1118

  20. #13
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    it looks like the same thing as just an energy audit of homes, air balancing and filtration/air quality(merv 14 filter), a more efficient home doesnt need the oversize units you see today...it looks like a cya pitch for customers when you just replace the unit/system and they are still unhappy..

    i have been doing this style of energy audits/IAQ/home inspection for a long time..but this plan is fully laid out with Q/A interaction to keep the customer on track..maybe the bid shown would be for a insulation/window/door sub-contractor then re-evaluate performance/air/leakage....

  21. #14
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    #tpis

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  22. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unlimited1 View Post
    it looks like the same thing as just an energy audit of homes, air balancing and filtration/air quality(merv 14 filter), a more efficient home doesnt need the oversize units you see today...it looks like a cya pitch for customers when you just replace the unit/system and they are still unhappy..

    i have been doing this style of energy audits/IAQ/home inspection for a long time..but this plan is fully laid out with Q/A interaction to keep the customer on track..maybe the bid shown would be for a insulation/window/door sub-contractor then re-evaluate performance/air/leakage....
    The process is designed to provide about as much as the homeowner can consume at each step.

    The comfort consult lets everyone know if the house is a basket case or not, and gives the HVAC guy enough to have very high level of confidence in their load calc, and some level of confidence that problems can or can not be fixed with HVAC.

    If the house is a basket case, further diagnostics and modeling are necessary to 1 - show homeowner due diligence in design recommendations AND again do that at a rate they can consume, 2 - thoroughly explore options and permutations.

    Our typical home performance project is $20-60k. It's reasonable to do more design and planning for that level of investment.
    Early Adopter round is OPEN - https://www.hvac20.com/earlyadopters.html HVAC 101 free pdf - http://bit.ly/HVAC101File1118

  23. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unlimited1 View Post
    it looks like the same thing as just an energy audit of homes, air balancing and filtration/air quality(merv 14 filter), a more efficient home doesnt need the oversize units you see today...it looks like a cya pitch for customers when you just replace the unit/system and they are still unhappy..

    i have been doing this style of energy audits/IAQ/home inspection for a long time..but this plan is fully laid out with Q/A interaction to keep the customer on track..maybe the bid shown would be for a insulation/window/door sub-contractor then re-evaluate performance/air/leakage....
    Part of the process is to measure the problems so we can give the customer options with a rated chance of success. For instance, many people have been conditioned to think that adding attic insulation and caulking windows and doors will solve their problem. In most cases, the improvement is negligible and the customer is disappointed. Then they decide they need bigger equipment and that often makes things worse.

    HVAC 2.0 slows down the process and gives the practitioner a chance to assess first and then make realistic recommendations designed for the customer's budget. And the HVAC 2.0 practitioner gets paid for the consultation. Even the customer can't afford something expensive such as crawlspace encapsulation or duct replacements, at least they know how the problem can be solved. Nate reports he's had customers call a year or two later to say they're ready to proceed now that they have the funding.

    The interview goes a long way in finding out what matters to the customer. For some it is a room that is never comfortable. Others have humidity issues or high energy bills. Putting in high efficiency equipment won't fix it. Taking the time to learn their pain and offer solutions makes a good contractor a hero instead of a heel.
    *********
    https://www.hvac20.com/ High efficiency equipment alone does not provide home comfort and efficiency. HVAC2.0 is a process for finding the real needs of the house and the occupants. Offer the customer a menu of work to address their problems and give them a probability of success.

    Find contractors with specialized training in combustion analysis, residential system performance, air flow, and duct optimization https://www.myhomecomfort.org/


    Site member map HERE!

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  25. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by CircusEnvy View Post
    Spam or not, this is what I’ve been pushing for the past couple years and more HVAC contractors should too. You have to look past the equipment and duct work for solutions if your customer isn’t comfortable. Crawlspace encapsulation, attic insulation, new windows, etc. - all that stuff improves IAQ and energy consumption much more than high SEER equipment and UV lights.
    Even caulking has a high ROI.

  26. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by theoldscroll View Post
    Even caulking has a high ROI.
    Only if it seals a leak. Many utility programs indiscriminately advise caulking and insulation without knowing the problem.

    I performed a blower door test for a house that had mold problems from a poorly sealed wall. The owner had to have the wall rebuilt. Her utility bill said her house used 100% more electricity than comparable houses. During the test with positive pressure and smoke, I found the duct system was leaking. When our installers were fixing the duct system they found two flex runs off the fittings and a 4" gap in the supply trunk.
    No amount of caulk would fix that.

    I also found her condensing coil was plugged. Her home warranty contractor said everything was fine and there was nothing they could do to improve it. I washed the coil and lowered discharge pressure 100 PSI on the R-22 system. Added 1/2 lb. to bring superheat down to spec and she was thrilled that her house could maintain 73 on a hot day.
    Last edited by kdean1; 11-24-2020 at 01:09 PM.
    *********
    https://www.hvac20.com/ High efficiency equipment alone does not provide home comfort and efficiency. HVAC2.0 is a process for finding the real needs of the house and the occupants. Offer the customer a menu of work to address their problems and give them a probability of success.

    Find contractors with specialized training in combustion analysis, residential system performance, air flow, and duct optimization https://www.myhomecomfort.org/


    Site member map HERE!

  27. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdean1 View Post
    Part of the process is to measure the problems so we can give the customer options with a rated chance of success. For instance, many people have been conditioned to think that adding attic insulation and caulking windows and doors will solve their problem. In most cases, the improvement is negligible and the customer is disappointed. Then they decide they need bigger equipment and that often makes things worse.

    HVAC 2.0 slows down the process and gives the practitioner a chance to assess first and then make realistic recommendations designed for the customer's budget. And the HVAC 2.0 practitioner gets paid for the consultation. Even the customer can't afford something expensive such as crawlspace encapsulation or duct replacements, at least they know how the problem can be solved. Nate reports he's had customers call a year or two later to say they're ready to proceed now that they have the funding.

    The interview goes a long way in finding out what matters to the customer. For some it is a room that is never comfortable. Others have humidity issues or high energy bills. Putting in high efficiency equipment won't fix it. Taking the time to learn their pain and offer solutions makes a good contractor a hero instead of a heel.
    My Flir does quite well with seeing and showing the customer many problems as it is.lack of insulation behind the walls and windows, electrical outlets leaking air.... uncomfortable rooms I have seen are more closed doors with no return air... Added jumper duct returns..No more problems

    Of course new windows Low e /argon and replacing the door seals..put Manufacture approved reflective thermal reflective window tint On the outside, adds impact protection to the glass as well( dont see tint listed)

    Installed mua duct where the kitchen exhaust hoods are, installed bathroom fans And fan roof caps with the Air flow damper doors with humidity sensors that shut the units off at the set point..

    Air leakage sealed at all electrical and plumbing penetrations in the home. I have worked on new construction LEED spec buildings and have been impressed with it....

    Seen lots of air leaks give the thermostat a false reading Because of a draft behind it..

    Upgraded the lights to LED..Installed Gas and electric tankless water heaters..

    Getting rid of a double layer reroof and choosing a lighter color shingle or installing a metal roof that sheds the radiant heat faster...

    I would really need to see A fully laid out before and after examples, as people like proven results and case examples

  28. #20
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    For case studies look at Nate's Energy Smart Ohio site - http://energysmartohio.com/case-studies/
    *********
    https://www.hvac20.com/ High efficiency equipment alone does not provide home comfort and efficiency. HVAC2.0 is a process for finding the real needs of the house and the occupants. Offer the customer a menu of work to address their problems and give them a probability of success.

    Find contractors with specialized training in combustion analysis, residential system performance, air flow, and duct optimization https://www.myhomecomfort.org/


    Site member map HERE!

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