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Thread: 134A HVACR versus 134A Automotive.....Difference??

  1. #1
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    134A HVACR versus 134A Automotive.....Difference??

    Is there a difference between what the Auto people use and the type I have??

    Some additive in the Auto type??

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    Quote Originally Posted by RLJN View Post
    Is there a difference between what the Auto people use and the type I have??

    Some additive in the Auto type??
    Some of the automotive stuff has pag oil and other junk in it.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by RLJN View Post
    Is there a difference between what the Auto people use and the type I have??

    Some additive in the Auto type??
    I have seen a large difference in pressures you are looking for due to temperature demand of unit. I did a beer cooler with a target temp of 36 degrees, these are largely different pressures than youll see in automotive which has a max desired temp of 60 degrees. See your PT chart. Hope this helps

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    But, 134A is 134A, auto tends to be more contaminated due to application, but yes it is the same refrigerant

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    134a is 134a...it's the name of a particular molecule so it is what it is. Now that being said if you are buying small cans of auto 134a it may have an additive like leak sealer but if it does it will say that on the can.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Stritchko View Post
    I have seen a large difference in pressures you are looking for due to temperature demand of unit. I did a beer cooler with a target temp of 36 degrees, these are largely different pressures than you’ll see in automotive which has a max desired temp of 60 degrees. See your PT chart. Hope this helps
    What? I admittedly don't know anything about MVAC, but I know that there's no "max desired temp of 60 degrees". Most automotive refrigeration compressors are designed to operate in the winter when in "windshield defrost" mode. What does your PT chart say then? Also, automobile air conditioning is made to be grossly oversized in order to cool the vehicle down from 130F or whatever it might start with. If you were to subject your beer cooler to the same conditions, I.E. start them both up when the inside temperature is 80 for example, I would think the pressures would be pretty close to the same.

    Just like how walk-in coolers and freezers that use R404A would be. On startup, the pressures would be almost identical as the boxes drop in temperature. It's just that the freezer is allowed to get lower.

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  9. #7
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    So is it the consensus that 134A HVACR would work fine in Auto use,.....
    but the reverse is not recommended?
    The HVACR gas would have less containments and if oil is needed for auto use it can be added in the field.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RLJN View Post
    So is it the consensus that 134A HVACR would work fine in Auto use,.....
    but the reverse is not recommended?
    The HVACR gas would have less containments and if oil is needed for auto use it can be added in the field.
    As long as you buy just refrigerant it doesn't matter. My hvac supplier has a pile of r134a jugs and half are labeled automotive but the only difference is the ones labeled ACR have an adapter to 1/4 flare.

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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    As long as you buy just refrigerant it doesn't matter. My hvac supplier has a pile of r134a jugs and half are labeled automotive but the only difference is the ones labeled ACR have an adapter to 1/4 flare.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk
    I hate that stupid automotive goofy ass acme fitting... Why did they do that crap?

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  13. #10
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    I buy 30lb jugs of MVAC and HVAC , it just depends on where I happen to be in town when I need it fast , same stuff my friend , just buy the adapter

    But ... if you buy those little ass 12oz cans , some have leak sealer , and oil , and dye , but they do sell those with pure 134 as well, you have to read the label

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    Quote Originally Posted by ammoniadog View Post
    What? I admittedly don't know anything about MVAC, but I know that there's no "max desired temp of 60 degrees". automobile air conditioning is made to be grossly oversized in order to cool the vehicle down from 130F or whatever it might start with
    I've checked vent temps while cruising and its usually 36-40 deg air blowing out , and im not using a stupid IR gun , I stick a probe in there

    So yeah its definitely oversized compared to the 55 deg from a home

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    the only differnce is auto will have a 5/16 flare on jug

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolen63 View Post
    the only differnce is auto will have a 5/16 flare on jug
    5/16 flare is on some minisplits. That goofy auto fitting is called a 1/2 acme.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JayMan7 View Post
    I hate that stupid automotive goofy ass acme fitting... Why did they do that crap?
    It was an attempt to stop people from using their R12 gauges and other stuff on R134a systems. R12 cars used mostly 1/4 flare service ports just like stationary stuff, with some exceptions like some having a 3/16 flare high side port. Remember supposedly chlorinated refrigerants will break down and destroy PAG oil, but the page that had a demo using a clear cylinder to show the oil turning black seems to have disappeared.

  19. #15
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    R-134A for Automotive can contain higher levels of Moisture then R-134A meeting ASHRAE Standards!

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    Quote Originally Posted by danielthechskid View Post
    It was an attempt to stop people from using their R12 gauges and other stuff on R134a systems. R12 cars used mostly 1/4 flare service ports just like stationary stuff, with some exceptions like some having a 3/16 flare high side port. Remember supposedly chlorinated refrigerants will break down and destroy PAG oil, but the page that had a demo using a clear cylinder to show the oil turning black seems to have disappeared.
    That was my understanding as well but it's like why do that? I mean 1/4 flares were not changed in hvac/r so why change them in auto? And why such a dumb fitting? They could have at least done 5/16 flare.

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  22. #17
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    134a is 134a. The additives in the small cans are not compatible with refrigeration systems.
    Officially, Down for the count

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    So after reviewing all the input, my conclusion is that my HVACR 134A would be fine in my car systems....mechanic gets XX per pound here...5-6 times my cost.

    But he has a lot invested in AC equipment....I should not whine....but makes me realize that I sell R-22 too cheap.

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  25. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by danielthechskid View Post
    It was an attempt to stop people from using their R12 gauges and other stuff on R134a systems. R12 cars used mostly 1/4 flare service ports just like stationary stuff, with some exceptions like some having a 3/16 flare high side port. Remember supposedly chlorinated refrigerants will break down and destroy PAG oil, but the page that had a demo using a clear cylinder to show the oil turning black seems to have disappeared.
    ALSO, before R134a became the norm, I remember that the two differently sized flare fittings on R12 systems was meant to keep automotive DIYers from connecting that little 14 oz can to the high side.
    I guess some folks did that and the can blew up due to too high of a pressure, so they dummy proofed it.

    AND...yes, "unadulterated" R134a from the auto parts section is the same stuff that we get in the bigger bottles. Otherwise, it'd be called something else.


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  26. #20
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    Same stuff. Also it's 134a not 134A. There is a difference.

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