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Thread: Metasys LCT Programming Question

  1. #1
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    Metasys LCT Programming Question

    Good morning, all!

    Always looking to build a better mouse-trap (pretty much learning everything from scratch on my own, so sometimes I don't even know how to build the mouse-trap in the first place).

    Trying to control the position of a damper based on whether neither, one, or both water heaters in question are running.

    So, Neither = 0%, one = 50%, and both = 100%. Putting it on the NAE as it's a UNT on N2 trunk, and we're not currently able to utilize HVACPro in certain situations (this falling under that category).

    I put it through its paces, and it seems to do the job. But, is there a way this could've been simpler?

    Also, any resources for working with these blocks? I hate to be negative, but I've found JCI's documentation to be less than helpful.

    EDIT - also, please disregard which point I pulled as an input reference. Changing that now - that was just so I could put the points "out of service" to test.

    Name:  LCT program.png
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    Thanks, all!

  2. #2
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    I think you could just add the status points, then feed into the mode of a 3 state MUX.

  3. #3
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    Can someone explain the "1:2" and the "2:2" nomenclature above??? I am assuming it interfaces with the inputs on the AND and XOR blocks in some fashion, but am not sure.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by VAEngineer View Post
    Can someone explain the "1:2" and the "2:2" nomenclature above??? I am assuming it interfaces with the inputs on the AND and XOR blocks in some fashion, but am not sure.
    VA,
    If you notice all the "connection points" are numbered (1 through 5). What the 1:2 and 2:2 indicate Connect point 1 (output):has 2 connected "Inputs" on the block(s) to the right.
    I took me a while to get used to that back in the day.
    If sense were so common everyone would have it !
    Never underestimate the power of human Stupidity !
    If folks took care of their cars like they do their HVAC Systems you'd see a lot more people walking !

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cagey57 View Post
    VA,
    If you notice all the "connection points" are numbered (1 through 5). What the 1:2 and 2:2 indicate Connect point 1 (output):has 2 connected "Inputs" on the block(s) to the right.
    I took me a while to get used to that back in the day.
    Ahhh so it is saying There are 2 places where connection point 1 are connected, and 2 places on the diagram where 2 is connected as well?

  6. #6
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    Thread Starter
    Both "1" and "2" are connected to the XOR and AND blocks - so, exactly.

    Too many lines make my eyes glaze over.

  7. #7
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    I probably didn't explain it well above.
    You can connect the 2 binary status points to an addition block, which should give you an integer 0-2. Create a 3 state MUX, then feed the integer into the mode. Simple and elegant.

  8. #8
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by JCIman View Post
    I probably didn't explain it well above.
    You can connect the 2 binary status points to an addition block, which should give you an integer 0-2. Create a 3 state MUX, then feed the integer into the mode. Simple and elegant.
    Perfect - thank you so much!

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