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Thread: Commercial domestic piping

  1. #1
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    Commercial domestic piping

    I was just curious about the application of certain components. Im looking at a system that has two thermostatic valves piped in parallel after the water heater and one is valved off. I assume they temper the supply water and one is a redundant backup piped in for code? The other component I didnt understand was a balancing valve or circuit setter. It gets water from the return and supply after the thermostatic valves then feeds the water after the water heater but before the thermostatic valves. There is only one return, so, would this be to manipulate flow through the water heater?

  2. #2
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    The return piping normally ties into the cold water side of the hot water heater. The circuit setter controls the return flow of the hot return water, just enough to keep hot water available at the end device.
    Is the mixing valve a three way valve with cold water entering it?
    Can you get some pictures, it would be easier to explain.

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  3. #3
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    Ill need to figure out how to post a picture after work. Return piping does tie into the cold water side of the water heater. The mixing valves do not tie into the cold water, they mix the hot water with return water which seems redundant because there are mixing valves at the individual fixtures as well. So, I assume the circuit setter would contribute to some type of pressure drop if many appliances are used at the same time, but this would be accounted for somewhat through the engineering of the pipe sizes?

  4. #4
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    Is the circuit setter installed on the hot water side? If that is, I haven't seen that used for that application. I am not an engineer, but there could be reason I have not seen this used.
    Have you had any problems with pressure or temperature in this hot water system?

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  5. #5
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    The temperature valves are to temper the water so nobody gets burned. The faucet valves can't be relied on to do that because you can turn on just the hot water.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  6. #6
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    Thread Starter
    Piping
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
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    Faucets are motion sensor with solenoid, there is a mixing valve at point of use, so the end user cannot make it hot or cold

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by uffdanow00 View Post
    Piping
    Is the far left vertical pipe domestic cold?

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  9. #9
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    yes, far left vertical is domestic cold, supply is above the two balancing valves and the return is the far right vertical

  10. #10
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    Attached is an article where they tell how to return pipe is connected to the system that utilizes a mixing valve.
    From what I understand this was a code change in 2015. I have not seen this myself, it is different than I normally work with. I usually never see any newer systems anyway.
    https://www.phcppros.com/articles/30...lation-systems

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  11. #11
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    Thread Starter
    Great info, thanks for sharing

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