Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: 3 Story townhouse

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Posts
    11
    Post Likes

    3 Story townhouse

    We have a project for new 3 story townhomes with flat roof and basement. Gas is available.

    What would you say is the best system to go with in this case?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    30,133
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by S_Kelly View Post
    We have a project for new 3 story townhomes with flat roof and basement. Gas is available.

    What would you say is the best system to go with in this case?

    Thanks
    Properly sized and installed.

    3 stories 3 system

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    10,609
    Post Likes

    Climate Zone is ___ ___ ?

    Quote Originally Posted by S_Kelly View Post
    We have a project for new 3 story townhomes with flat roof and basement. Gas is available.

    What would you say is the best system to go with in this case? Thanks
    Equipment room on FIRST Floor?

    Architectural drawings are necessary in order to make sense
    of what Your 3 STORY TOWNHOUSE Is
    regarding the layout/ floor area.

    The actual heating and/or cooling needs can systematically be defined for your locale.
    _______________________ ___ _______ _ Figure 1 _
    Perimeter: Width - __ feet/ Depth - __ feet

    I presume the project is in the U.S.
    _______ ZIP _ _ _ _ _

    Gmail address: racingdan11

    www.mysimplifiedhvac.com

    Ventilation : ASHRAE 62.2, 2013

    https://www.thehouseplanshop.com/050m-0008.php
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Last edited by dan sw fl; 09-27-2020 at 06:55 PM.
    Designer Dan __ It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with Some Art. _ _ KEEP IT SIMPLE & SINCERE ___ __ www.mysimplifiedhvac.com ___ __ Define the Building Envelope & Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows & Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,360
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by S_Kelly View Post
    We have a project for new 3 story townhomes with flat roof and basement. Gas is available.

    What would you say is the best system to go with in this case?

    Thanks
    "Best" can mean so many different things...

    Best cost?
    Best quality?
    Best efficiency?

    You haven't provided any important details whatsoever.

    For such a big project it seems like you would have the GC, via subs, making those decisions as part of the overall construction bid, and mostly they focus on keeping the cost down.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    "I think Quantum tunneling would work great... "

    "Call a technician for God's sake. Or we'll see you on the news or the Dark Side of the Moon."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Saint Pail, Minnesota
    Posts
    991
    Post Likes
    I’m going to reference your previous post regarding a 3 story townhouse.
    https://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread...TU-replacement

    Your best bet is to have a properly designed system, proper load calculations performed, proper ductwork design, and proper commissioning of each system. Air balancing is crucial in multi-story homes.

    In theory a three ton package unit Should perform the same as a 3 ton split system. It all comes down to who ever is purchasing the equipment.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    30,133
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Pnasty View Post
    I’m going to reference your previous post regarding a 3 story townhouse.
    https://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread...TU-replacement

    Your best bet is to have a properly designed system, proper load calculations performed, proper ductwork design, and proper commissioning of each system. Air balancing is crucial in multi-story homes.

    In theory a three ton package unit Should perform the same as a 3 ton split system. It all comes down to who ever is purchasing, sizing, designing and installing the equipment.
    Fixed

  7. Likes kdean1 liked this post.
  8. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Saint Pail, Minnesota
    Posts
    991
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by pecmsg View Post
    Fixed
    OP wants the easiest answer, not willing to put in work of providing details or any response.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Culver, Oregon (Central OR)
    Posts
    3,089
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Pnasty View Post
    OP wants the easiest answer, not willing to put in work of providing details or any response.
    He wants to hear it costs 500 dollars. Uncle Ben will change the filter.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    10,609
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by S_Kelly View Post
    We have a project for new 3 story townhomes with flat roof and basement. Gas is available.

    What would you say is the best system to go with in this case?
    https://www.energystar.gov/ia/home_i...ors/qispec.pdf

    Buildings should be designed to IECC 2018 +
    MODULAR construction +
    State Building Codes.

    https://codes.iccsafe.org/content/do...te_type=public
    Designer Dan __ It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with Some Art. _ _ KEEP IT SIMPLE & SINCERE ___ __ www.mysimplifiedhvac.com ___ __ Define the Building Envelope & Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows & Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Posts
    11
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Thanks for the responses, I appreciate it.

    As far as details, these townhomes are about 1,000 sq.ft. per floor, 3 floors, so 3,000 total sq.ft.
    They have a basement and flat roofs.

    I know detailed load calcs. need to be done.

    I was wondering more in general whether the standard would be to put in a RTU with 3 zones, 1 zone per floor with zone dampers and some kind of bleed off to other zones. Similarly, if a split system was installed.. would you put in the air handler in a certain floor and provide similar zone control or 1 air handler/ 1 condenser per floor.


    Thanks again, I appreciate it

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Saint Pail, Minnesota
    Posts
    991
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by S_Kelly View Post
    Thanks for the responses, I appreciate it.

    As far as details, these townhomes are about 1,000 sq.ft. per floor, 3 floors, so 3,000 total sq.ft.
    They have a basement and flat roofs.

    I know detailed load calcs. need to be done.

    I was wondering more in general whether the standard would be to put in a RTU with 3 zones, 1 zone per floor with zone dampers and some kind of bleed off to other zones. Similarly, if a split system was installed.. would you put in the air handler in a certain floor and provide similar zone control or 1 air handler/ 1 condenser per floor.


    Thanks again, I appreciate it
    With that amount of floor space on each level i would say 3 split systems would work best for comfort. Zoned systems definitively require someone that is experienced with them.

    In any case, if one single system (zoned or not) is installed, ductwork has to be perfect to provide comfort across all levels. It doesn’t really matter if you use a package unit on the roof or a split system with a furnace in the basement. There’s package units on top of buildings 5 stories high that pump air down to the first floor and air handlers in basement that pump air up 4 stories. Ductwork design is crucial.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Culver, Oregon (Central OR)
    Posts
    3,089
    Post Likes
    Vrf system for real zoned heating/cooling.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    10,609
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by S_Kelly View Post
    Thanks for the responses, I appreciate it.

    As far as details, these townhomes are about 1,000 sq.ft. per floor, 3 floors, so 3,000 total sq.ft.
    They have a basement and flat roofs.

    I know detailed load calcs. need to be done.

    I was wondering more in general whether the standard would be to put
    in a RTU with 3 zones, 1 zone per floor with zone dampers and some kind of bleed off to other zones.

    Similarly, if a split system was installed ..
    would you put in the air handler in a certain floor and provide similar zone control or 1 air handler/ 1 condenser per floor.

    Thanks again, I appreciate it
    How many RTU's could possibly exist or be used in residences/ 3-story townhouses ?


    ___ How many 3-story townhouses have a FLAT roof?
    ____________ 2-Story + Basement (underground)

    ___ How many 3-story townhouse are large enough to warrant a separate HVAC system on each floor ?

    __ ~ 1 out of 40,000+ residences / LARGE, 2-story + basement WITH Flat roof.

    __ .:. HVAC personnel may come upon this specific situation less than once a decade.

    __ THERE IS NO STANDARD for Unique Buildings.
    ______ .. CUSTOM DESIGN.
    Designer Dan __ It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with Some Art. _ _ KEEP IT SIMPLE & SINCERE ___ __ www.mysimplifiedhvac.com ___ __ Define the Building Envelope & Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows & Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    10,609
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Pnasty View Post

    With that amount of floor space on each level i would say 3 split systems would work best for comfort.

    Zoned systems definitively require someone that is experienced with them.

    In any case, if one single system (zoned or not) is installed, ductwork has to be perfect to provide comfort across all levels. It doesn’t really matter if you use a package unit on the roof or a split system with a furnace in the basement.

    There are package units on top of buildings 5 stories high that pump air down to the first floor and air handlers in basement that pump air up 4 stories. Ductwork design is crucial.
    + the RTU's just might have 5, 10 or 15 HP motors on the blowers
    that are capable of providing upto 2" ESP.

    ... NOT the 1/2, 3/4 or 1 HP found in more conventional 3 to 5-ton set-ups.
    Designer Dan __ It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with Some Art. _ _ KEEP IT SIMPLE & SINCERE ___ __ www.mysimplifiedhvac.com ___ __ Define the Building Envelope & Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows & Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    46,675
    Post Likes
    To the OP...

    Might want to read my signature paragraph...
    The key to your issue is within the couple of sentences...

    Sorry... however doing it correctly, so it works properly...
    Will be the expensive way.

    Now if you want a compromise that costs less... there will be compromises in the comfort from level to level.

    Your choice...
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *The value of comfort, over the long term; leave economic choices behind!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Saint Pail, Minnesota
    Posts
    991
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by dan sw fl View Post
    + the RTU's just might have 5, 10 or 15 HP motors on the blowers
    that are capable of providing upto 2" ESP.

    ... NOT the 1/2, 3/4 or 1 HP found in more conventional 3 to 5-ton set-ups.

    True I didn’t think about that.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •