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Thread: Need help running pvc drain on install work

  1. #1
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    Need help running pvc drain on install work

    I install carrier equipment. When doing installs I run into an issue when I run my pvc drains. Obviously you want a slight downward pitch on the drain. So I usually put a threaded pvc adapter into the coil, then a street 90 to the right or left (depends on setup of the area), and a piece of pvc that runs either off the left side, or across the top of the furnace to the right side. In either case I give it a very slight pitch downward. Then I do a tee, and do a stick all the way down into the condensate pump, floor drain etc etc.

    The issue I have is that I want the stick of pvc that runs from the floor to the tee to be as perfectly straight up and down as it gets. I like clean installs. But if you pitch the pvc off the coil downward slightly, the tee will be slightly cocked off-plumb. This means the vertical piece of pvc will be slightly cocked as well, and not plumb like I want it to be. Is there any trick to getting around this? Today when I was at the supply house they had a demo furnace/ac/ductwork set up in the showroom, and I noticed their pvc drain was cocked slightly downhill as well, with a tee like mine, but the vertical piece was completely plumb. Did they bend the plastic somehow to make it do that? Or is it some trick I haven't figured out yet?

    Sorry if this sounds like a stupid pointless question. I really take pride in my installs but the pvc drain always screws with my head because it doesnt look right with that gangster lean.

  2. #2
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    You can make your own "swivel"connection by using 90* ell/st ell and/or 45*ell/45st ell. That drop will be straight as an arrow.

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  4. #3
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    Heat gun and glove. Make it point any way you like.

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  6. #4
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    Here is how I recently redid mine.
    Name:  20200919_094837.jpg
Views: 263
Size:  3.99 MB

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  8. #5
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    I do it like this or some variation of this. It doesn't need much slant.
    Ps this was a repair not my install.
    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

  9. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by YOUNG FROSTY View Post
    I install carrier equipment. When doing installs I run into an issue when I run my pvc drains. Obviously you want a slight downward pitch on the drain. So I usually put a threaded pvc adapter into the coil, then a street 90 to the right or left (depends on setup of the area), and a piece of pvc that runs either off the left side, or across the top of the furnace to the right side. In either case I give it a very slight pitch downward. Then I do a tee, and do a stick all the way down into the condensate pump, floor drain etc etc.

    The issue I have is that I want the stick of pvc that runs from the floor to the tee to be as perfectly straight up and down as it gets. I like clean installs. But if you pitch the pvc off the coil downward slightly, the tee will be slightly cocked off-plumb. This means the vertical piece of pvc will be slightly cocked as well, and not plumb like I want it to be. Is there any trick to getting around this? Today when I was at the supply house they had a demo furnace/ac/ductwork set up in the showroom, and I noticed their pvc drain was cocked slightly downhill as well, with a tee like mine, but the vertical piece was completely plumb. Did they bend the plastic somehow to make it do that? Or is it some trick I haven't figured out yet?

    Sorry if this sounds like a stupid pointless question. I really take pride in my installs but the pvc drain always screws with my head because it doesnt look right with that gangster lean.
    You dont want a "Slight" downward pitch you need 1/4" per ft run down. Also get in the habit of installing a union so ti can be removed for access.

  10. #7
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    Bdserv, do you have a trap on that drain?

    It looks like a negative pressure zone to me.

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  12. #8
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    3 90's equal a swing joint. Get some cheap PVC 90's and play around with them until you get it.

  13. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmlandru View Post
    3 90's equal a swing joint. Get some cheap PVC 90's and play around with them until you get it.
    A swing joint equals a guaranteed future clog.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

  14. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    A swing joint equals a guaranteed future clog.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk
    Why not a "guaranteed for life" PV glued fitting? I have some customers for 3-4 decades. I would be horrified if one of my PV glued fittings leaked,especially a fitting going from a horizontal to a vertical drop. Pssstt.,,,,,,,just like my solder/braze joints!

    No clog!

  15. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechmanTerry View Post
    Why not a "guaranteed for life" PV glued fitting? I have some customers for 3-4 decades. I would be horrified if one of my PV glued fittings leaked,especially a fitting going from a horizontal to a vertical drop. Pssstt.,,,,,,,just like my solder/braze joints!

    No clog!
    Yes always lots of primer and lots of glue. our inspector likes to see purple primer but I just try to make sure to smear the letters with my clear primer because I want my work to look nice.
    I have noticed a trend of more frequent clogging on installs where someone put a ton of fittings especially back to back 90s but I know the most important thing that causes drain clogs is air filters not getting changed or using spun fiberglass filters.
    As usual the problem goes back to lack of maintenance.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

  16. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by RLJN View Post
    Bdserv, do you have a trap on that drain?

    It looks like a negative pressure zone to me.
    After I posted that I thought someone would quickly point out that there was no trap, so I tried to go back to edit my post but apparently I do not have the ability to edit my posts [didn't see any option or button to do so].

    Anyway, the trap is built into the run in the way it runs to the outside... Florida style - straight down and then horizontally under ground then back up above ground outside.

  17. #13
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    More volume in a trap than required, more issues with fouling. Same if inadequate slope & sag.

  18. #14
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    In about 10 years or so is there any problem with that buried trap?
    I have read here that others implied they had no problems.

  19. #15
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    Had a number of job problems due to sag/slope, improperly sized trap causes same problem to a lesser degree.
    Nearly every mfg has instruction on proper trapping. Use best practice to minimumize problems.

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