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Thread: HVAC system, Lennox or Bryant?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaldLoonie View Post
    Bryant indeed has a matching zoning system to the variable speed equipment. It is part of the Evolution system and would require their stats. Pretty much everything high end requires the same mfr's proprietary zoning and controls.
    Hey BL...

    Question on this evolution system...

    Does it still use the 'Observer' stat... and do you still have to have an 'Observer' at each zone location???

    Been a few years since I did the class...
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *The value of comfort, over the long term; leave economic choices behind!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  2. #22
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    Bryant uses the Evolution system which is like the Carrier Infinity. Observer is ICPs doings. I'm guessing you'd need the Observer control at each zone but not 100%. I have had no training on it. Actually I think the Observer is gone, the new Ion system replaces it but might not interchange with the old Observer stuff.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ga-hvac-tech View Post
    You need to verify this...

    SL297NV = 2 stage VS

    SLP98V = modulating... we call then MOD furnaces

    Thanks. I had read through the specifications, but I wasn't sure, so I wanted some verification.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaldLoonie View Post
    Bryant indeed has a matching zoning system to the variable speed equipment. It is part of the Evolution system and would require their stats. Pretty much everything high end requires the same mfr's proprietary zoning and controls.
    Does that zoning system have a name? If so, what is it?

    I can't figure that out.

    I'm looking at Bryant's product page:

    https://www.bryant.com/en/us/product...mostats/#28905

    For example, on Lennox' product page, I can see the name of the zoning system here:

    https://www.lennox.com/products/comfort-controls/zoning


    I just want to make sure I have the names right, so that if I go with the aforementioned contractor, and I reach out to him, and I decide between Bryant or Lennox, I ask about the correct names for the respective zoning system and thermostat.

    (And with the Lennox, I have to now make sure I mention the modulating furnace, since I had mentioned a different model before this.)

  5. #25
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    If you are planning to go with the zoning... this will not matter...

    However if I remember...
    The 2 stage VS furnace, in a NON zoning installation, will work with the variable capacity outside unit and the Icomfort stat.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *The value of comfort, over the long term; leave economic choices behind!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by ga-hvac-tech View Post
    If you are planning to go with the zoning... this will not matter...

    However if I remember...
    The 2 stage VS furnace, in a NON zoning installation, will work with the variable capacity outside unit and the Icomfort stat.
    What did you mean by this? Since I am going with zoning, what is "this" that won't matter?

    Thank you.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuraman00 View Post
    What did you mean by this? Since I am going with zoning, what is "this" that won't matter?

    Thank you.
    You CANNOT use the 2 stage VS furnace with the factory zoning system... will not work.
    You must use the MOD (modulating) furnace.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *The value of comfort, over the long term; leave economic choices behind!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  8. #28
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    Installation started last week.

    Furnace installation, and ductwork is finished.

    Waiting for the condenser unit and zoning board to arrive. That's now not expected to arrive until 9/17.

    Maybe it's because of the corona virus, but if not, those concerns that I had read about Lennox parts being hard to obtain, and about delays with their supply chain, ended up being true.

    Question: My main circuit breaker is 90 amps.

    Is there a concern that if I had a lot of appliances running, such as an oven (~ 50 Amps) and the air conditioner (up to 40 amps), that it would trip the main circuit breaker?

    The A/C is connected to a sub panel. So is the oven.

    I have a 200 amp sub panel now.

  9. #29
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    A circuit breaker protects the WIRE to an appliance... to avoid over-heating and the potential for a fire.

    Rarely... is a circuit actually loaded to the full breaker size.

    OTOH... one should not take circuit load lightly... as in plugging in half a dozen things on one double outlet... grin!

    Parts shortages are part of most industries these days...
    Before the virus... manufacturing was running on a 'just in time' inventory system (parts arrive just in time, no cushion).
    Now the chain of flow of parts is broken... and it will take time to get it flowing smoothly again.
    The shutdown, while it sounded like a good idea at the time...
    Was really a dumb idea!
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *The value of comfort, over the long term; leave economic choices behind!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuraman00 View Post
    Installation started last week.

    Furnace installation, and ductwork is finished.

    Waiting for the condenser unit and zoning board to arrive. That's now not expected to arrive until 9/17.

    Maybe it's because of the corona virus, but if not, those concerns that I had read about Lennox parts being hard to obtain, and about delays with their supply chain, ended up being true.

    Question: My main circuit breaker is 90 amps.

    Is there a concern that if I had a lot of appliances running, such as an oven (~ 50 Amps) and
    the air conditioner (up to 40 amps), that it would trip the main circuit breaker?

    The A/C is connected to a sub panel. So is the oven.

    I have a 200 amp sub panel now.
    __ How does one end up with a sub-panel ( 200 A ) larger that the MAIN Circuit Breaker ( 90 A) ?

    ___ Seems pretty damn dangerous IMO.
    Designer Dan __ It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with Some Art. _ _ KEEP IT SIMPLE & SINCERE ___ __ www.mysimplifiedhvac.com ___ __ Define the Building Envelope & Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows & Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ga-hvac-tech View Post
    A circuit breaker protects the WIRE to an appliance... to avoid over-heating and the potential for a fire.

    Rarely... is a circuit actually loaded to the full breaker size.

    OTOH... one should not take circuit load lightly... as in plugging in half a dozen things on one double outlet... grin!

    Parts shortages are part of most industries these days...
    Before the virus... manufacturing was running on a 'just in time' inventory system (parts arrive just in time, no cushion).
    Now the chain of flow of parts is broken... and it will take time to get it flowing smoothly again.
    The shutdown, while it sounded like a good idea at the time...
    Was really a dumb idea!
    Thank you.

    So then if I am using a lot of simultaneous appliances (such as the oven and air conditioner, from my previous example), then could that act cause one of the wires to the circuit breaker (whether the air conditioner or oven) to overheat, and trip?

    But, if the amp of the wire is greater than the device amp size, then would that prevent over-heating?

  12. #32
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    [QUOTE=nuraman00;25927548]Thank you.

    So then if I am using a lot of simultaneous appliances (such as the oven and air conditioner, from my previous example), then could that act cause one of the wires to the circuit breaker (whether the air conditioner or oven) to overheat, and trip?

    But, if the amp of the wire is greater than the device amp size, then would that prevent over-heating?[/QUOTE[

    Current elec code requires a dedicated circuit (one breaker, one wire, one load)... for each major appliance: washer, dryer, AC, oven, range, elec water heater, dishwasher, etc... each has its OWN breaker. The circuit is designed and installed to handle the electrical load of that one appliance.
    Only general lighting circuits and a few specialty circuits are multi-location on a single breaker.

    The place where over-amping can happen... is the entire load on the main breaker panel or a sub panel...
    In the case of a sub-panel, the wire to the sub panel is protected by a breaker in the main panel.

    Again; the breaker is to protect the wire... the load needs to stay within the parameters of the design of the electrical system.

    If in doubt... get sparky (an electrician) out to do an inspection of the electrical system of your home.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *The value of comfort, over the long term; leave economic choices behind!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  13. #33
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    Thanks for the explanation.

    So if an appliance did overheat, then the problem would just be with that appliance, or that wire, and not related to another appliance.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuraman00 View Post
    Thanks for the explanation.

    So if an appliance did overheat, then the problem would just be with that appliance, or that wire, and not related to another appliance.
    In theory, yes...

    Lets get some terms correct...
    Overheat is not really a good way to look at it...
    Overload the circuit is a better way to look at it...
    Overloading a circuit means, for whatever reason; the load on the circuit tries to draw more power than the breaker wants to let it...
    Thus the breaker trips...

    In a perfect world... each breaker would handle the load on that circuit...

    However... I have seen a single circuit cause the main breaker of the entire load (the one out by the meter, or the big one at the top of the panel)... trip over what would seem like an insignificant overload of a single circuit...

    This is really an area one needs to get 'sparky' (an electrician) involved... as there are variables that need the expertise of experience... to work out.

    Advise... do NOT DIY this... without good insurance...
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *The value of comfort, over the long term; leave economic choices behind!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  15. #35
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    Thanks.

  16. #36
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    Can PSIG be converted to tons?

    I see on the condenser unit it says 448 psig.

    I tried this converter, but it tells me 0.2 tons. So I don't know.

    https://www.convertunits.com/from/ps...n/square+inch+[long]

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuraman00 View Post
    Can PSIG be converted to tons?

    I see on the condenser unit it says 448 psig.

    I tried this converter, but it tells me 0.2 tons. So I don't know.

    https://www.convertunits.com/from/ps...n/square+inch+[long]
    These are two entirely different things...

    The only similarity...

    Are they are measured with similar units of measure...
    Nothing more there to relate the two together.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *The value of comfort, over the long term; leave economic choices behind!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  18. #38
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    Oh, ok.

    I just looked up what psig is for, it's for gauge pressure.

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  20. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuraman00 View Post
    Oh, ok.

    I just looked up what psig is for, it's for gauge pressure.
    Yes... however it goes farther...

    'Tons' of AC capacity... is the energy to melt 1 ton of ice (do not remember if it is a metric or US ton)... and is generally considered to be 12,000 BTU's of heat energy.
    A BTU will raise one pound of water, one degree F... (yeah, not sure why 'British' thermal unit is in pounds, rather than KG's... but it is what it is...

    The PSI you noted... is a rating of how much pressure of refrigerant the item can handle...

    As you can see... totally un-related...

    However it was and is a valid question...
    To start on a foundation of understanding how AC (and refrigeration) works...

    Look up 'latent heat' if you want to dig in...
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    GA's basic rules of home heating and AC upgrades:
    *Installation is more important than the brand of equipment
    *The duct system keeps the house comfortable; the equipment only heats and cools (and dehumidifies)
    *The value of comfort, over the long term; leave economic choices behind!
    Choose your contractor wisely!

  21. #40
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