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Thread: Leaks - how did they...

  1. #21
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    What the hell does "how did THEY" leak check way back when ,as if I (we) are not here anymore. LOL, youngin'. As shown already the good HALIDE LEAK DETECTOR INSTRUMENT and Soap Bubbles were used. I still have my Halide!!!! I still have 3-4 "elements" just waiting to be put to work.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechmanTerry View Post
    What the hell does "how did THEY" leak check way back when ,as if I (we) are not here anymore. LOL, youngin'. As shown already the good HALIDE LEAK DETECTOR INSTRUMENT and Soap Bubbles were used. I still have my Halide!!!! I still have 3-4 "elements" just waiting to be put to work.
    Does the halide detector create phosgene gas?

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by R600a View Post
    Does the halide detector create phosgene gas?

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk
    As close to phosgene as you can get! A little phosgene early in the morning is better than 4 cups of coffee!

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  6. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by rexp View Post
    Yes Ectofix, it is pressurized to about 120 PSIG.

    Interesting comment about better made coils in days gone by. Makes me wonder if the benefit of higher efficiency (thinner materials) offsets the costs of having to replace units more often. I can't imagine that is the case. People rant about higher efficiency & energy savings without considering the costs related to manufacturing replacement equipment more often.
    Ahh, you missed the point. Higher efficiency and shorter life span is all about moving boxes. It is very hard to sell a new unit every 10 years if the old one lasts 20-30 years like they use to.

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  8. #25
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    Visual Inspection, Halide Torch, Bubble Soap, and Dye. It was red and called "Trace" - although their may have been others.

    Something else to realize is that leaks were not the cause for mania that they are now. Adding refrigerant was routine, inexpensive, and accepted as routinely necessary. I well remember jobs that were adding hundreds of pounds per week and nobody gave it a thought until I got there - it was just a normal part of maintenance to them. Like greasing a motor. Which they were often doing just about at the same rate by the way. <g>

    Which reminds me of a really funny story.

    PHM
    -------------


    Quote Originally Posted by rexp View Post
    Prior to sensitive "sniffers", how in the world did Technicians find leaks in systems? I thought I could hone my skills with an old dehumidifier. I know it leaks, found & fixed one pinhole, but I sure can't find the other(s) (and no, I haven't bought a sniffer, not yet anyway).
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Visual Inspection, Halide Torch, Bubble Soap, and Dye. It was red and called "Trace" - although their may have been others.

    Something else to realize is that leaks were not the cause for mania that they are now. Adding refrigerant was routine, inexpensive, and accepted as routinely necessary. I well remember jobs that were adding hundreds of pounds per week and nobody gave it a thought until I got there - it was just a normal part of maintenance to them. Like greasing a motor. Which they were often doing just about at the same rate by the way. <g>

    Which reminds me of a really funny story.

    PHM
    -------------
    I am setting on the floor eagerly waiting to hear the story.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

  10. #27
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    Thread Starter
    "Youngin'" - HAH. I am 63 thank you. I am here 'cause every few years I have to work on learning something new, keeps the mind sharp.

    Lots to learn from you young whipper-snappers.

  11. #28
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    Customer was a large international company making products that anyone would immediately recognize. Maintenance costs on equipment used to produce the products was charged to Production Budget rather than to Maintenance Budget. Including the chillers and their refrigerant.

    When I first started taking care of their chillers a skid of 125 lb. R-22 cylinders lasted them less than a month. That's 1000 lbs. I remarked about it but they said not to worry about it - that's just the way it is around here. I could not Stand it and while I was there for other things; mostly controls and so forth, I started secretly repairing the leaks. I found the leaks and kept a log of locations for each chiller and ordered the parts required to fix them: gaskets, seals, relief valves, etc. If the leaks couldn't be fixed with the chiller operating I would say that I had to come in when production was down, usually Sunday at double-time (also something that nobody gave a sh!t about <g>), and fix it then. And in a year or so the refrigerant use really fell.

    The chillers each held 2500-3000 lbs as a normal operating charge and before I got there they had been running them with maybe 1000 lbs of charge or less. Their 'method' had been to ignore the chillers until a chiller would not perform and then just add 125ers until the chillers 'started working'. Zero interest or even awareness - it was just like a tank had a low fluid level to them. Maintenance avoided repair costs (which would have been on their workload) and Production paid the bills - without any ability to control them. <g>

    The recipes for the finished products are very strict and extremely carefully monitored by the QC Lab crew. Even a very light deviation in the finished product and everything produced to that point is destroyed. So one day a team showed up from Corporate, unannounced, and would not explain why they were there. And they started in asking very pointed questions, interviewing department heads individually, and intently checking and cross-checking records of all kinds.

    Eventually it came out that they were there to investigate why the formulas for the products had been changed at that facility. Eventually someone asked for the genesis of their suspicion and the Corporate guys revealed that an ingredient's use had been fairly consistent for years - and growing at the same rate as increased production rates. But then it had suddenly dropped. By about 90% - and they wanted to know why. Nobody in the production department even knew what the item number indicated and swore it was not something that ever went into the products.

    Finally it was revealed that the accounting item in question was R-22. Which nobody in the production department knew anything about either. Then the suspicion turned from product alteration to theft - somebody must have been ordering something un-needed and then stealing it.

    Somehow or other the 'investigation' got to the head of maintenance - who knew what the item was, and how, why it was used - but had no knowledge of why the use would drop. But he immediately thought of me. <g>

    He and I had a good laugh about it later.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

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  13. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Customer was a large international company making products that anyone would immediately recognize. Maintenance costs on equipment used to produce the products was charged to Production Budget rather than to Maintenance Budget. Including the chillers and their refrigerant.

    When I first started taking care of their chillers a skid of 125 lb. R-22 cylinders lasted them less than a month. That's 1000 lbs. I remarked about it but they said not to worry about it - that's just the way it is around here. I could not Stand it and while I was there for other things; mostly controls and so forth, I started secretly repairing the leaks. I found the leaks and kept a log of locations for each chiller and ordered the parts required to fix them: gaskets, seals, relief valves, etc. If the leaks couldn't be fixed with the chiller operating I would say that I had to come in when production was down, usually Sunday at double-time (also something that nobody gave a sh!t about <g>), and fix it then. And in a year or so the refrigerant use really fell.

    The chillers each held 2500-3000 lbs as a normal operating charge and before I got there they had been running them with maybe 1000 lbs of charge or less. Their 'method' had been to ignore the chillers until a chiller would not perform and then just add 125ers until the chillers 'started working'. Zero interest or even awareness - it was just like a tank had a low fluid level to them. Maintenance avoided repair costs (which would have been on their workload) and Production paid the bills - without any ability to control them. <g>

    The recipes for the finished products are very strict and extremely carefully monitored by the QC Lab crew. Even a very light deviation in the finished product and everything produced to that point is destroyed. So one day a team showed up from Corporate, unannounced, and would not explain why they were there. And they started in asking very pointed questions, interviewing department heads individually, and intently checking and cross-checking records of all kinds.

    Eventually it came out that they were there to investigate why the formulas for the products had been changed at that facility. Eventually someone asked for the genesis of their suspicion and the Corporate guys revealed that an ingredient's use had been fairly consistent for years - and growing at the same rate as increased production rates. But then it had suddenly dropped. By about 90% - and they wanted to know why. Nobody in the production department even knew what the item number indicated and swore it was not something that ever went into the products.

    Finally it was revealed that the accounting item in question was R-22. Which nobody in the production department knew anything about either. Then the suspicion turned from product alteration to theft - somebody must have been ordering something un-needed and then stealing it.

    Somehow or other the 'investigation' got to the head of maintenance - who knew what the item was, and how, why it was used - but had no knowledge of why the use would drop. But he immediately thought of me. <g>

    He and I had a good laugh about it later.
    That's pretty funny I knew it would be interesting.
    If you ever get to the point where you can't work anymore you really should become an author I'd love to read more of your stories.

    Sent from the Okie state usin Tapatalk

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