Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Why medical waste should be transported with refrigerated vehicles? To prevent microb

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    19
    Post Likes

    Confused Why medical waste should be transported with refrigerated vehicles? To prevent microb

    Will a refrigeration unit help prevent microbial from proliferating in a rather low temperature?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    9
    Post Likes
    Yes. It is the safest and more reliable way of removing uncertain waste. Having it out in the open and not temperature secured could be very risky. There is no point in risking high scale contamination when you are not even sure what you're getting yourself into.

  3. Likes guchen liked this post.
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Northern NV
    Posts
    2,366
    Post Likes
    Think freezer failure and meat putrefying...
    A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness. Bad manners. Lack of consideration for others in minor matters. A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot.
    ― Robert A. Heinlein

  5. Likes guchen liked this post.
  6. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    19
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    would like to know how hospitals manage the biomedical/clinical waste, but I cannot even find one useful link with detailed explanation. Also wanna know more information on refrigerated truck relating to its application in clinical waste management, still cannot find how it works.

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Medford, N.Y.
    Posts
    7,434
    Post Likes
    You get involved w/ Medical Waste?? Most Dr.'s use a "Medical Waste Disposal Co''. They show up and they leave w/ your unwanted stuff.

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Northern NV
    Posts
    2,366
    Post Likes
    Not sure of present day procedures, but most hospitals used to have on site incinerators for tissue disposal. Other "stuff" (needles, gloves etc.) go to a waste management company typically.

    Can you illuminate us on the interest?
    A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness. Bad manners. Lack of consideration for others in minor matters. A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot.
    ― Robert A. Heinlein

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Medford, N.Y.
    Posts
    7,434
    Post Likes
    Google, "How do hospitals dispose of Medical Waste,BioHazard Materials?"

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    in a house, Appomattox, Va.
    Posts
    4,843
    Post Likes
    I would have voted incinerator, too. negate the hazard rather than carrying it all over the countryside.
    Col 3:23


    questions asked, answers received, ignorance abated

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    19
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by Juan Madera View Post
    Not sure of present day procedures, but most hospitals used to have on site incinerators for tissue disposal. Other "stuff" (needles, gloves etc.) go to a waste management company typically.

    Can you illuminate us on the interest?
    because I am trying to write an article on the usage of refrigerated trucks, especially its importance in the carriage of biomedical waste. When I google such information, there is little to no useful materials/papers which detailed its working procedure from the hospital to the treatment sites.

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Northern NV
    Posts
    2,366
    Post Likes
    Might look to the State of NY as they are stacking bodies inside of refrigerated trucks. Probably have some information you could use.
    A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness. Bad manners. Lack of consideration for others in minor matters. A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot.
    ― Robert A. Heinlein

  13. Likes guchen liked this post.
  14. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    US of A
    Posts
    5,853
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by guchen View Post
    Will a refrigeration unit help prevent microbial from proliferating in a rather low temperature?
    http://www.hercenter.org/regsandstandards/dot.php


    Department of Transportation Regulations

    (b) Additional requirements for packaging Category A infectious substances. Category A infectious substances must be packaged according to the following requirements, depending on the physical state and other characteristics of the material.

    (1) Infectious substances shipped at ambient temperatures or higher. Primary receptacles must be made of glass, metal, or plastic. Positive means of ensuring a leakproof seal must be provided, such as heat seal, skirted stopper, or metal crimp seal. If screw caps are used, they must be secured by positive means, such as with adhesive tape, paraffin sealing tape, or manufactured locking closure. Lyophilized substances may also be transported in primary receptacles that are flame-sealed with glass ampoules or rubber-stoppered glass vials fitted with metal seals.

    (2) Infectious substances shipped refrigerated or frozen (ice, pre-frozen packs, dry ice). Ice, dry ice, or other refrigerant must be placed around the secondary packagings or in an overpack with one or more complete packages marked in accordance with 178.503 of this subchapter. Interior supports must be provided to secure the secondary packagings in the original position after the ice or dry ice has dissipated. If ice is used, the outer packaging or overpack must be leakproof. If dry ice is used, the outer packaging or overpack must permit the release of carbon dioxide gas and otherwise meet the provisions in 173.217. The primary receptacle and the secondary packaging must maintain their integrity at the temperature of the refrigerant used, as well as the temperatures and pressures of transport by aircraft to which they could be subjected if refrigeration were lost.

    (3) Infectious substances shipped in liquid nitrogen. The primary receptacle and the secondary packaging must maintain their integrity at the temperature of the liquid nitrogen as well as the temperatures and pressures of transport by aircraft to which they could be subjected if refrigeration were lost. Refrigerated liquid nitrogen packagings must be metal vacuum insulated vessels or flasks vented to the atmosphere to prevent any increase in pressure within the packaging. The use of safety relief valves, check valves, frangible discs, or similar devices in the vent lines is prohibited. Fill and discharge openings must be protected against the entry of foreign materials that might cause an increase in the internal pressure. The package orientation markings specified in 172.312(a) of this subchapter must be marked on the packaging. The packaging must be designed to prevent the release of any refrigerated liquid nitrogen irrespective of the packaging orientation.
    Signature removed Violated rule #15

  15. Likes guchen liked this post.
  16. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    19
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by Juan Madera View Post
    Might look to the State of NY as they are stacking bodies inside of refrigerated trucks. Probably have some information you could use.
    Thanks, I will

  17. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    19
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by pageyjim View Post


    Department of Transportation Regulations

    (b) Additional requirements for packaging Category A infectious substances. Category A infectious substances must be packaged according to the following requirements, depending on the physical state and other characteristics of the material.

    (1) Infectious substances shipped at ambient temperatures or higher. Primary receptacles must be made of glass, metal, or plastic. Positive means of ensuring a leakproof seal must be provided, such as heat seal, skirted stopper, or metal crimp seal. If screw caps are used, they must be secured by positive means, such as with adhesive tape, paraffin sealing tape, or manufactured locking closure. Lyophilized substances may also be transported in primary receptacles that are flame-sealed with glass ampoules or rubber-stoppered glass vials fitted with metal seals.

    (2) Infectious substances shipped refrigerated or frozen (ice, pre-frozen packs, dry ice). Ice, dry ice, or other refrigerant must be placed around the secondary packagings or in an overpack with one or more complete packages marked in accordance with 178.503 of this subchapter. Interior supports must be provided to secure the secondary packagings in the original position after the ice or dry ice has dissipated. If ice is used, the outer packaging or overpack must be leakproof. If dry ice is used, the outer packaging or overpack must permit the release of carbon dioxide gas and otherwise meet the provisions in 173.217. The primary receptacle and the secondary packaging must maintain their integrity at the temperature of the refrigerant used, as well as the temperatures and pressures of transport by aircraft to which they could be subjected if refrigeration were lost.

    (3) Infectious substances shipped in liquid nitrogen. The primary receptacle and the secondary packaging must maintain their integrity at the temperature of the liquid nitrogen as well as the temperatures and pressures of transport by aircraft to which they could be subjected if refrigeration were lost. Refrigerated liquid nitrogen packagings must be metal vacuum insulated vessels or flasks vented to the atmosphere to prevent any increase in pressure within the packaging. The use of safety relief valves, check valves, frangible discs, or similar devices in the vent lines is prohibited. Fill and discharge openings must be protected against the entry of foreign materials that might cause an increase in the internal pressure. The package orientation markings specified in 172.312(a) of this subchapter must be marked on the packaging. The packaging must be designed to prevent the release of any refrigerated liquid nitrogen irrespective of the packaging orientation.
    Thank you so much. it helps me a lot.

  18. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    US of A
    Posts
    5,853
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by guchen View Post
    Thank you so much. it helps me a lot.
    Post a link to this thread when complete your project.
    Signature removed Violated rule #15

  19. Likes guchen liked this post.
  20. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    19
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by pageyjim View Post
    Post a link to this thread when complete your project.
    Actually it's a marketing article. I have no idea whether it's proper to post the link here or not. But if u would like to read, I am glad to post my article link here: Refrigerated Vehicles Playing an Important Role in the Carriage of Global Medical Waste

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •