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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
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    8
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    Thread Starter
    Thanks. That's the only code and information the system gives me on 'Last 10 events'. And, lots of them. I'm sure there are many possibilities. Hence, why I'm asking for input.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    27,426
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    You need a Tech on site with knowledge and test equipment taking measurements.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
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    8
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    Thread Starter
    Thanks for all the responses. I had a tech come out, with Carrier knowledge. Although, I won't know if it works or not unless it gets down to 28 degrees or so. He basically tore apart my furnace looking for things. The most compelling thing was the alternate flue output was not capped off. The cap was sitting inside the unit in the tray. He said the pressure probably was out of whack when the furnace came on and the PR switches probably kept dropping out and not allowing the igniters to work over and over again, thus causing the numerous Error 34 - Igniter Faults all these years. And, not to mention he said that could have causes CO2 gases in my basement. However, my CO2 sensor located very close to the Furnace closet has never gone off. Anyway, we'll see if this fixes the problem next cold cycle. Which in Atlanta may not be soon.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Chico, Ca #StateofJefferson
    Posts
    1,907
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    The cap in the side of the furnace that a flue pipe could run through? That's not your issue. Sure he didnt mean the cap off an alternative drain port on the inducer assembly? Most furnaces are multi-pose, they can be discharge up, left or right horizontally discharge or down discharge. Depending on how it's used it will drain condensate differently so theres several drain plugs and caps that need to be moved to accommodate this.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    27,426
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    Quote Originally Posted by dodge55 View Post
    Thanks for all the responses. I had a tech come out, with Carrier knowledge. Although, I won't know if it works or not unless it gets down to 28 degrees or so. He basically tore apart my furnace looking for things. The most compelling thing was the alternate flue output was not capped off. The cap was sitting inside the unit in the tray. He said the pressure probably was out of whack when the furnace came on and the PR switches probably kept dropping out and not allowing the igniters to work over and over again, thus causing the numerous Error 34 - Igniter Faults all these years. And, not to mention he said that could have causes CO2 gases in my basement. However, my CO2 sensor located very close to the Furnace closet has never gone off. Anyway, we'll see if this fixes the problem next cold cycle. Which in Atlanta may not be soon.
    If that's a UL listed CO detector it's almost Worthless! They wont alarm until the co is 70 PPM for over an hour. Way too HIGH! First responders require SCBA if Co is above 15PPM

    Search for a Low Level CO detector. 1 In the basement 1 near each bedrooms

    I like the defender model
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    9,520
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    Quote Originally Posted by Makeitcold View Post
    The cap in the side of the furnace that a flue pipe could run through? That's not your issue. Sure he didnt mean the cap off an alternative drain port on the inducer assembly? Most furnaces are multi-pose, they can be discharge up, left or right horizontally discharge or down discharge. Depending on how it's used it will drain condensate differently so theres several drain plugs and caps that need to be moved to accommodate this.
    This might be one of the inducers that has a Fernco type cap on one of two exhaust ports.

    The newer inducers, Carrier's at least, you rotate the complete inducer. Their older ones had a top and bottom option and whichever was not used has a rubber cap held on by a screw clamp.

    If this was the case, probably some moisture damage and definitely CO, Carbon Monoxide, and flue gasses coming into the cabinet and the space!!
    The Food Stamp Program, administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is proud to be distributing the greatest amount of free meals and stamps EVER.
    Meanwhile, the National Park Service, administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior, asks us to "Please Do Not Feed the Animals". Their stated reason for this policy "... the animals become dependent on handouts and will not learn to take care of themselves."
    from an excerpt by Paul Jacob in Sun City, AZ

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