Page 1 of 9 12345678 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 115
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
    Posts
    4,086
    Post Likes

    Vehicle Repair Problems

    Poodleheadmickey's post about his van problems got me to thinking that all of us have been frustrated from time to time trying to get our auto fixed. I'll start this in hopes we will see a lot of examples.

    I bought an older very low mileage Lincoln from a Ford dealer. Got a good price because there wasn't much interest in it from anyone else. It needed a few minor things done to it and the salesman wouldn't discount the price for me to do the repairs. He insisted they would fix it right. I relented but warned him they were not going to half ass the fix.
    One of the problems was at just under a half tank of gas the fuel gage dropped to empty and the low fuel warning light came on. When I picked up the car they said the problem was a relay located behind the glove box and they had to order the part. When the part came in they installed it but the problem persisted. I took it back and told them I wanted to be with the mechanic when he checked it out. He was totally lost and decided to try and BS me by showing me the wiring diagram.
    I let him know that wasn't going to work and ask "if I can prove to you what is wrong will you give me the part so I can install it?" They were puzzled so agreed. I told the guy I had seen that problem before and disconnected the wire connected to the fuel sending unit and connected a variable resister in series with ground. By adjusting the resister the fuel gage worked perfectly from full to empty. The reason is simple. The sending unit has a spring loaded contact that follows the resistor. The resistor is not perfectly round so when the spring tension is lost contact with the resistor is lost. The gage is varied by resistance to ground and without resistance the gage goes to zero.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    428
    Post Likes
    I have been fixing my own vehicles for the last 20 years or so for this very reason. Stuff I've done range from simple repairs to full teardowns and rebuilds of automatic transmissions.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    428
    Post Likes
    I guess I should have included a story with my post in the spirit of this thread.

    Took a vehicle in once for some warranty work. I was informed that the brake fluid was dirty and needed changing...except that by chance I had changed it about 2 months earlier and knew for a fact that it was clean and you could tell by visually inspecting the reservoir.

    The service adviser had a difficult time trying to explain that one to me.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
    Posts
    4,086
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    They usually explain that kind of thing by saying it is on their routine maintenance list and it is time to do it.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Clearwater, Florida
    Posts
    1,573
    Post Likes
    Well.

    I got a 2003 Kawasaki Z1000 that I crashed rather violently in the middle of the night, flipped it head over heels 3 or 4 times, hit the ground doing about 50 mph, bounced a couple of times, bike bounced around, slid and just wasn't happy after that. I then opted in for repairing it which was a lengthy path of getting the frame and forks checked and then getting told it would cost 3K to fix it.

    I then opted in for doing it myself and then I smacked some new wheels on it, Rim and Tire as the old ones were bent in from when it flipped. Then replaced the fearings, put a lot of time into it, painted everything and voila. 8 months go by of smooth sailing and then the engine blows out, 2 holes in the casing, piston ring just hanging out the side, i then foolishly decided to keep doing it as I wasn't really in the market financially for a new bike and I only want a bike, I don't want a car. Had I known I would've never continued.

    So I found an engine on Ebay for 600 bucks, it showed up AND milky oil came out, cover was cracked on it, oil fitting was mashed in, I mean, it was a mess. So I ended up getting it for free as it was going to be a bit of work to fix it up. Me and 2 buddies put it in and oh boy it was something to replace a complete engine, fun in a way but a nightmare at the same time just because of how everything has to be removed to do anything, finally got it in and everything's back in and we went to start it, moment of truth and...... nothing.

    Turned out one switch which we didn't notice was also broken, we ended up taking it off the old engine and it cranked and started. turned out to be the crankshaft position sensor, lol. No wonder.

    It ran okay, little rich but still had a hell of a kick to it but it was just never the same. About 3 or 4 months after that I got a 2007 Ninja ZX6R which is what I have now, I love that thing and so there you go.

    My sad story with a happy ending.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
    Posts
    4,086
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    That is a story of determination and persistence.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Clearwater, Florida
    Posts
    1,573
    Post Likes
    It was a nightmare, I finally brought my bike to the dealer when I picked up my new bike and their mech checked it out.

    "You know, this thing is really dangerous to be driving around"

    "Figured as much "

    People have the idea bikes are cheaper, but it really depends on how finnicky you are on details, I can't stop doing stuff, small stuff, all the time. It's like an addiction to just make it better all the time.

    OH! I forgot a detail. So the week before my engine blew out, I spent like 3 days after work (working till 11 PM) carbon fiber wrapping my gas tank and going to bed at 2-3 AM. I did this because the "wind" had knocked over my bike, so when I came home, it was laying on the ground, crying fuel. Then I get it all done and it's beautiful and the first time I take it out. POOF, engine blew out. Smoking, flames, it was great, truly great.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
    Posts
    4,086
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    I can relate to the blow out. I had a car that slipped an insert at highway speed. I looked at the engine and a rod big end was lodged in one hole in the block and the end cap was dangling in the other hole. The piston drove up with the intake valve open and blew the air filter off and the engine compartment caught fire. I was hoping the entire car would burn up but in the middle of nowhere a guy came along with a fire extinguisher and put it out.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Clearwater, Florida
    Posts
    1,573
    Post Likes
    Wow.

    That sounds extreme.

    Amazing what these things will do if left to their own devices. Even more amazing someone figured out how to harness an engine that can do 16000 RPM's and make someone sit on it!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    169
    Post Likes
    My 05 Silverado started having strange issues of the fan running after I shut it down and running like crap. Ran the fan til the battery died. I took it to a local shop being I just didn't want to mess with it. They wanted to change the battery, alternator, and wiring harness. I called BS, took it home and went through a wiring diagram and traced the issue to the ECM. Connector on it had a bad case of the green fuzzies due to water invasion. Contact cleaner, nylon brush, and some dielectric grease, cleared the codes, and never had a problem again. 1200$ saved.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Louisburg Kansas
    Posts
    4,086
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    You caught them red handed Fred.
    No man can be both ignorant and free.
    Thomas Jefferson

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    169
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by WAYNE3298 View Post
    You caught them red handed Fred.
    Only thing I caught them at was them being too lazy to troubleshoot. I find the same thing where I work. I get a call for a leak in a WIC or WIF. My first thought is 'how do they know there is a leak'. I look back in the customers history and see that one of our techs had been out there before(sometimes a few), and couldn't find a leak, added dye/sealant, changed schraeder valves and were on their way. I think I am the only one with a leak detector there. It amazes me. Between the leak detector and bubbles, I have yet to not find the origin of a leak. I used to do what they do, pump some crap in the system and be on my way. But I have learned the err of my ways, and wont even keep that crap on my truck any more.
    But back this shop, it was just pure laziness. Makes me wonder how many dipshits have paid all that money for them to shoot a parts cannon at it. Granted when they changed the wiring harness, they would have found the green fuzzies and hopefully rectified it(maybe they wouldn't have used die electric grease and Id be back after the first rain storm), but it still sucks for those that dont know how to troubleshoot and depends on these jack wagons.

  13. Likes Turtleman, Core_d liked this post.
  14. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    169
    Post Likes
    duplicate post

Page 1 of 9 12345678 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Contracting Business
HPAC Engineering
EC&M
CONTRACTOR