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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
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    Question Condensate overflow sensor locking unit when there's no condensate in pan

    I have a Bosch TA049-1VTC that is around 6 years old. Over the past few months, the condensate overflow sensor has triggered the unit to stop. It gives me the four clicks and LED flashes that indicate this sensor is the one throwing the fault. Each time, I have checked the pan and it's dry. So I used an old toothbrush to scrub the end of the wire, turned the unit off at the thermostat, and then re-started it. That seems to work. But if this persists, it's going to be annoying. I can't seem to get whatever is at the end of that wire (for the condensate detection) unattached from the pan. Is it just a bare wire or is there some kind of sensor? I'm wondering if I can replace whatever sensor is there or if I can just snip the last 1/4" of the wire if that's all it is. I'm also wondering if the bracket the technician used to secure it in place has somehow grounded the wire. So is there anything to watch out for or can I just rip that sucker off and make something of my own to attach it at the top of the pan?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    25,315
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    Have you tried a new toothbrush?


    Quote Originally Posted by darenwelsh View Post
    I have a Bosch TA049-1VTC that is around 6 years old. Over the past few months, the condensate overflow sensor has triggered the unit to stop. It gives me the four clicks and LED flashes that indicate this sensor is the one throwing the fault. Each time, I have checked the pan and it's dry. So I used an old toothbrush to scrub the end of the wire, turned the unit off at the thermostat, and then re-started it. That seems to work. But if this persists, it's going to be annoying. I can't seem to get whatever is at the end of that wire (for the condensate detection) unattached from the pan. Is it just a bare wire or is there some kind of sensor? I'm wondering if I can replace whatever sensor is there or if I can just snip the last 1/4" of the wire if that's all it is. I'm also wondering if the bracket the technician used to secure it in place has somehow grounded the wire. So is there anything to watch out for or can I just rip that sucker off and make something of my own to attach it at the top of the pan?
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    25,315
    Post Likes
    I say just rip that sucker off.


    Quote Originally Posted by darenwelsh View Post
    I have a Bosch TA049-1VTC that is around 6 years old. Over the past few months, the condensate overflow sensor has triggered the unit to stop. It gives me the four clicks and LED flashes that indicate this sensor is the one throwing the fault. Each time, I have checked the pan and it's dry. So I used an old toothbrush to scrub the end of the wire, turned the unit off at the thermostat, and then re-started it. That seems to work. But if this persists, it's going to be annoying. I can't seem to get whatever is at the end of that wire (for the condensate detection) unattached from the pan. Is it just a bare wire or is there some kind of sensor? I'm wondering if I can replace whatever sensor is there or if I can just snip the last 1/4" of the wire if that's all it is. I'm also wondering if the bracket the technician used to secure it in place has somehow grounded the wire. So is there anything to watch out for or can I just rip that sucker off and make something of my own to attach it at the top of the pan?
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    25,315
    Post Likes
    Sorry, just messing with you.

    You're not going to get much in the way of answer. Because there are a bunch of sensors out there, and we don't have a clue what you are looking at. Besides, we're not supposed to give out info to homeowners.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

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