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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    5,906
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    Find a set of drawings for each school. The hit each school 1 by 1.

    Document model, serial, filters, and belts. Create a tag program if they are not tagged. Ex: fcu1-1, rtu2, wshp-116

    Take the current number of schools and divide by 4. Ex; 20 schools \ 4 = 5.

    Each month, change filters in 5 of the schools. This way you are on a 3 month filter change and you dont have to do filters all in 1 month

    You can order the filters a month in advanced and have them delivered. Every year i would do belts, and leave the old belt at the unit incase of a failure. Then swap the old belt on the next belt change.

    Condensate tabs work good too. Throw some tabs in the pan as you do filters.

    The green evap cleaners help coils from collecting dirt. In the cooling seasons when doing filters, spray some green cleaner on the Evap. The condensate will rinse the cleaner down the drain.

    Figure out the majority of equipment you have and get training on that equipment. If you cant find manuals, "rundawg" on this form has lots of IOMs and myself. Im sure others can chime in too.

    Figure out what BAS the schools are using and take classes on those.

    If the schools have lots of chillers and boilers, take some combustion classes and pump classes.

    You will find how lots of systems operate in their IOMs.

    Make sure to exercise the shutoff valves thru out the buildings. Exercising valves prevents lots of issues and money when shit hits the fan.

    Keep binders in each school with the list of equipment and filters/belts. Have IT scan all of them in to a computer as well.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. Likes heatingman liked this post.
  3. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    East Side
    Posts
    7,507
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    Quote Originally Posted by gravity View Post
    Make sure to exercise the shutoff valves thru out the buildings. Exercising valves prevents lots of issues and money when shit hits the fan.

    Man, this is one of the most overlooked things that should be done. I don't know how many times we've had to drain entire loops, or shut down an entire steam or water system cause of failed valves.

    I'll add to that, if you have large hand valves with the threaded rods that the hand wheels operate, please, sweet baby jesus put some antisieze or grease on the threaded rod when you exercise the valve.

  4. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    5,906
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    Technical Training?

    Rising stem gate valves

    And yes! Lube those bad boys up

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    6
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Thank you everyone for your much needed advice! This is awesome information and I will use it well. I have much to do and learn. The feedback is amazing and look forward to being involved in this forum.

  6. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    27,244
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by MResser View Post
    Thank you everyone for your much needed advice! This is awesome information and I will use it well. I have much to do and learn. The feedback is amazing and look forward to being involved in this forum.
    A good information source:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #19
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    26,577
    Post Likes
    You probably need to start writing things down. You also likely have a variety of equipment. What I'm trying to lead into is that there is a variety of equipment, which will require a variety of lists, it'll help keep you on track and leave that brain space for other stuff.

    You'll also find that the order you do things in makes a difference, so change the order of the items on your list when you discover a better way. For example, one of the first things I like to do is inspect the disconnect. Only takes ten seconds. BUT the very first thing you do when you walk up to a unit, is DO NOT turn it off. You could be resetting any potential error codes.

    If you have roof tops with larger equipment, really helps to have a 6-8 footer stationed there all the time. Saves a lot of hassle, which makes the day go a lot easier.

    Lot of little things to be aware of.


    Quote Originally Posted by MResser View Post
    Thank you everyone for your much needed advice! This is awesome information and I will use it well. I have much to do and learn. The feedback is amazing and look forward to being involved in this forum.
    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

  8. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Upstate NY / Way upstate
    Posts
    2
    Post Likes
    I am new to this forum and new at a school system which has old Nesbitt steam univents. Looking for some information/training on these units please. They are not computer controlled. The school temperature averages around 85 degrees. Windows are open a lot in the winter. A lot of the univents are always really hot. We turn the fan off so it won't blow hot air all day. I was told that the rubber diaphram could be bad in the actuator valve. What is the best method to test these? Can I hook up a hand held vacuum tester and see if they hold pressure?

  9. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    27,244
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by schooldof View Post
    I am new to this forum and new at a school system which has old Nesbitt steam univents. Looking for some information/training on these units please. They are not computer controlled. The school temperature averages around 85 degrees. Windows are open a lot in the winter. A lot of the univents are always really hot. We turn the fan off so it won't blow hot air all day. I was told that the rubber diaphram could be bad in the actuator valve. What is the best method to test these? Can I hook up a hand held vacuum tester and see if they hold pressure?
    Heating Help dot com is the place for steam questions

    Not computer controlled so pneumatic controls?
    Low press high press Steam?
    Made on site?

  10. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Upstate NY / Way upstate
    Posts
    2
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by pecmsg View Post
    Heating Help dot com is the place for steam questions

    Not computer controlled so pneumatic controls?
    Low press high press Steam?
    Made on site?
    Yes pneumatic controls and it is low pressure steam. We have two 28HE Smith boilers.

  11. #23
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Posts
    9
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by MResser View Post
    I have been in the HVAC/R industry for over 15 yrs, residential to commercial install/service. I have recently been employed by the school district in which I am the sole HVAC Service/Install/Maintenance/Coordinator for 15 buildings in my area. The recent tech had retired and left before being replaced. My experience in commercial maintenance is limited but, my background should help with some of my lack of experience. The district has offered me an opportunity to learn and build on my knowledge. My question what are some great service/maintenance training programs that would be worth while in taking. I have looked into TRANE Univ. and a couple of online programs.

    Thank you for your time and any input is greatly appreciated.

    M
    If they are paying, get you designation with SMA AND SMT designations through Bomi. Each course is around 600$ and there are 8 in total. After the first three you get a certificate for Maintenance. After the next two courses you will be designated a System Maintenance ADMINISTRATOR and after the next 3 you will be designated A system Maintenance Tech. This will cover all aspects of Building Maintenance. Plumbing electric, HVAC, Energy management, ect. In addition I would also do something with TRANE. This is the direction I am going.

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