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  1. #1
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    Dec 2019
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    Technical Training?

    I have been in the HVAC/R industry for over 15 yrs, residential to commercial install/service. I have recently been employed by the school district in which I am the sole HVAC Service/Install/Maintenance/Coordinator for 15 buildings in my area. The recent tech had retired and left before being replaced. My experience in commercial maintenance is limited but, my background should help with some of my lack of experience. The district has offered me an opportunity to learn and build on my knowledge. My question what are some great service/maintenance training programs that would be worth while in taking. I have looked into TRANE Univ. and a couple of online programs.

    Thank you for your time and any input is greatly appreciated.

    M

  2. #2
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    Jul 2007
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    Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by MResser View Post
    The district has offered me an opportunity to learn and build on my knowledge. My question what are some great service/maintenance training programs that would be worth while in taking.
    This is a great course, and invaluable training, if working with gas burning appliances - https://www.nationalcomfortinstitute...ex.cfm?pid=943
    Instead of learning the tricks of the trade, learn the trade.

  3. #3
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    Nov 2006
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    Southeastern Pa
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    Many institutional settings like school districts and universities use some type of building automation system. I would identify it and contact the manufacturer to take that training, with an emphasis on fault diagnostics.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist
    Member, IAEI

    AOP Forum Rules:







  4. Likes heatingman liked this post.
  5. #4
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    Aug 2002
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    Southold, NY
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    Find the design documents for the buildings and study them.

  6. #5
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    Mar 2015
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    Medford, N.Y.
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    There is not a PM program in place now?

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Waterloo N.Y.
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    I service 20 school districts. Only 1 has anybody on site that can even change filters when needed. A lot of them have installed or are installing Day Automation. Still lots of crappy Barber-Coleman controls out there.

  8. #7
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    Dec 2019
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    Thread Starter
    Yes and no, currently everything is about a year over due plus some. I had applied over 2 years ago, they gave it to someone who really had no experience except for test and balance. He was not interested in the service and trouble shooting side of the trade and gave up fairly quickly. During that time the current tech was months from retiring and was still available to give a rundown of all the schools and their systems. He is now gone and will not come back to give any solid advice. I took the position because this is what I want to be doing as a career and the benefits are very good, there really is no where else where I live that I can earn benefits and have retirement. Back to answering your question, the program is all over the place, I have started from scratch and decided to start over one by one. I am used to working for shops where it is about quantity and not quality (which I understand you need to make money efficiently). Now its the opposite money is really no longer the object of my position rather then the comfort of the kids and their learning environment. What I am lacking is the true and correct way of doing preventive maintenance. Just changing belts, filters, and greasing motors and bearings periodically is only part of the job. I am mostly self taught with a cert. in a 2 year training program.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
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    Thread Starter
    Where I am we have mix match set of controls between Johnson and LONG technologies. who knows what else right now. The last set of Pneumatics are on the way out so everything will be elect.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Sounds like you’re gonna have some time.....so, slow down. Start to make a plan of action and follow it.

    If you’re lacking equipment experience, and have been tossed into the fire, the first thing I would do is identify the largest quantity of the same brand of equipment. If you have 50 Trane RTU’s, and 10 York’s, and a few makeup air units, the. Focus on the Tranes first. Then collect info on the others, and read.


    That said, the actual reality is that you’re not gonna have time to do that. Your priority is going to be whoever is screaming the loudest. So you’re gonna be jumping all over the place.

    All you can really do is get manuals and read, read, read, read!!

  11. #10
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    Dec 2019
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    Thread Starter
    That is good advice, I appreciate the feedback! Also you are absolutely right on the amount of time I am not going to have.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Chicago area
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    First thing to do is one school at a time, make a list of the equipment under your care.

    As part of that, make a list of all the belts and filters for each unit.

    There are software programs available that can be used to make work orders and such, perhaps enlist the administrative wing or the IT department to aid in finding such a program if there is not one already.

    The programs can help you track maintenance and also help target what your trouble equipment is based on cost of repairs and such. Work orders will also help justify what you are doing day to day, in case that ever becomes an issue.

    Once you know what you have, then you can look up the requisite maintenance schedules for the particular equipment.

    Also and this is imperative. Make sure any building control systems are kept on maintenance contracts to keep them up to date. When the controls are left to there own devices, then things can get out of whack in short order then very costly and time consuming to bring back to what they ought to be.

    As one guy, you will need assistance covering that much ground, so find an outside vendor you can trust to help when needed.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  14. #12
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    Dec 2004
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    I just realized I did not even touch on the subject of training.

    I would get as much as you possibly can get.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  15. #13
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    Nov 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by heatingman View Post
    First thing to do is one school at a time, make a list of the equipment under your care.

    As part of that, make a list of all the belts and filters for each unit.

    There are software programs available that can be used to make work orders and such, perhaps enlist the administrative wing or the IT department to aid in finding such a program if there is not one already.

    The programs can help you track maintenance and also help target what your trouble equipment is based on cost of repairs and such. Work orders will also help justify what you are doing day to day, in case that ever becomes an issue.

    Once you know what you have, then you can look up the requisite maintenance schedules for the particular equipment.

    Also and this is imperative. Make sure any building control systems are kept on maintenance contracts to keep them up to date. When the controls are left to there own devices, then things can get out of whack in short order then very costly and time consuming to bring back to what they ought to be.

    As one guy, you will need assistance covering that much ground, so find an outside vendor you can trust to help when needed.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


    that's great advice. they should have a Work Order program in place already......if not, that is definitely the very first order of business.

    It can grow into a monster though, the orders will stack up fast, and then the higher ups will be wondering why the tickets aren't complete, then you'll just end up chasing your tail. it could be easy justification for another man though also. I'd be careful with it. keep it to yourself, and maybe start small using only the tracking side for yourself.

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