Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 19
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    75
    Post Likes

    Heating Degrees Per Hour

    On a new electric system, forced air, about how many degrees per hour per cubic s.f. should it take to heat?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Beatrice, NE
    Posts
    10,028
    Post Likes
    This will vary according to how much internal load there is at the time, how much solar gain there is, how much loss from wind, door openings, etc, and what the temperature difference there is between inside and outside. The other variable is how close the equipment was sized to the design load, i.e. load 50k equipment 100k or load 50k equipment 52k.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    75
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    With all variables considered is there a basic range or rule of thumb? I know its hard to answer when your a tech due to what has to be considered first but can it be simplified down to a range / like 5 degrees per hour is good 10 degrees is better and 20 degrees is perfect for say 8000 cubic feet?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Beatrice, NE
    Posts
    10,028
    Post Likes
    The only constant I know of is internal building materials, furnishings, etc can only absorb heat at a rate of 3 degrees an hour. So with an oversized system the space will reach temperature, shut down, then come back on shortly as the cold soaks up the heat. If it is probably sized it will just run a long time and the walls/etc will be absorbing the heat at a similar rate but when it cycles off it will stay off a while.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    25,622
    Post Likes
    At design conditions 0°F temperature rise!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    75
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    on one of the units at my job we figured 3 degrees per hour from 67F to 70F with the outside at 30F for 9500 cubic feet and so we wanted to be able to say either "that is good" or compared to others "that is bad".

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Beatrice, NE
    Posts
    10,028
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexCollins View Post
    on one of the units at my job we figured 3 degrees per hour from 67F to 70F with the outside at 30F for 9500 cubic feet and so we wanted to be able to say either "that is good" or compared to others "that is bad".
    When it is -10 outside does that unit keep up or does the indoor temperature drop? If it holds but doesn't cycle it is probably about right.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    75
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    and I also figured the heat load of the space is 30K and the coil is producing 28,400K

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    9,712
    Post Likes
    You are basically requesting
    1. _ WHAT is the composite (Total) Heat Capacity of the building Interior ?
    2. + What is the EXCESS Heating Capacity available at Any given OutDoor Temperature?
    3. + What time of day is it?

    1. How much concrete, steel, drywall, water, furniture, etc., is in the building?
    __
    2. Indoor Temperautre: 70'F
    ___ Design Temperature: 0'F

    ___ ODT: -10'F or 65'F

    ___ Manual J or N Calc
    ___ Manual S calc

    ... looks like 1,000,000 + permutations
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    9,712
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexCollins View Post
    and I also figured the
    heat load of the space is 30K and
    the coil is producing 28,400K
    Heat Loss = 30,000 BTU/HR at 0'F
    … … ___ ___ 428.57 BTU/ HR- 'F [ 70'F Interior Temp. ]

    … … Heat Loss at 20'F = 21,429 BTU/HR
    _____________ 40'F = 12,857 BTU/HR

    Equipment Capacity = 8,323.6 Watts =28,400 BTU/HR

    Excess Heat Capacity at 20'F = 6,971 BTU/HR
    ___________________ 40'F = 15,542 BTU/HR

    Next ..
    ___ divide the Excess Heat Capacity
    ___ ___ by the TOTAL Heat Capacity { BTU / 'F } of ALL Interior materials.
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    75
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by dan sw fl View Post
    Heat Loss = 30,000 BTU/HR at 0'F
    … … ___ ___ 428.57 BTU/ HR- 'F [ 70'F Interior Temp. ]

    … … Heat Loss at 20'F = 21,429 BTU/HR
    _____________ 40'F = 12,857 BTU/HR

    Equipment Capacity = 8,323.6 Watts =28,400 BTU/HR

    Excess Heat Capacity at 20'F = 6,971 BTU/HR
    ___________________ 40'F = 15,542 BTU/HR

    Next ..
    ___ divide the Excess Heat Capacity
    ___ ___ by the TOTAL Heat Capacity { BTU / 'F } of ALL Interior materials.
    Thank you that makes so much sense now,I am sure I will understand this in the future, feel free to break it down in laymans terms.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    9,712
    Post Likes
    Post # 10 Follow-up
    ___ ____ _____

    Heat Loss = 30,000 BTU/HR at 0'F
    … … ___ ___ 428.57 BTU/ HR- 'F [ 70'F Interior Temp. ]

    … … Heat Loss at 20'F = 21,429 BTU/HR
    _____________ 40'F = 12,857 BTU/HR

    Equipment Capacity = 8,323.6 Watts =28,400 BTU/HR

    _________ Excess Heat Capacity at 20'F = 6,971 BTU/HR
    ________________ _____________ use 9,000 BTU / 'F for an Example
    for TOTAL INTERIOR MATERIAL HEAT CAPACITY
    …...……………...……...…………...………...……… … 0.77 'F Increase / Hour when it is 20'F outside

    _______________ ___ ___ ___ at 40'F = 15,542 BTU/HR
    ___________________ ___ ___ … … … … 1.73'F Increase / Hour when it is 40'F outside
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    75
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    OK , So when its 30 outside your increase per hour would be 1.27 F and I figured 3 F per hour actual increase so that means I am exceeding and must have really good air flow. Right ?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •