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  1. #14
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    I'm confused. Are you asking what oxy/acet pressures to use for brazing?

    If so, the pressures remain the same regardless of the size of material. It's all about tip size. You use the same pressures on your regulators for a tiny tip as you do for a giant rosebud. It's just that you'll get a LOT more flow with a giant rosebud. You may even need to manifold tanks together (parallel) to get enough flow, especially with the acetylene.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  2. #15
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    By standard definition the test pressures would be 22.5 and 45 lbs. <g>

    Is this for a hard piped O&A system for a facility? For a glass lab / glass manufacturing place or an iron fabrication shop or something?

    What does the spec call for?

    I think I would want to see the piping pass test at 150 lbs. or so.

    PHM
    --------




    Quote Originally Posted by glennac View Post
    The IFGC says you need a test pressure of 1 1/2 times the maximum working pressure. Need to get a value. I assume 30 lbs. for oxygen and 15 lbs. for acetylene. I figure to be safe at least 80 psig to test but would like to know what you "aces" think would be the maximum working pressure would ever be used? Thank you very much.
    PHM
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    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  3. #16
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  4. #17
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    This website lists no pressure higher than 45 lbs. - so a 150 lb. test pressure would still be OK.

    What is the application?

    What piping are you testing?

    Does the job have a spec. sheet?

    Or are you doing this for yourself or otherwise casually?

    PHM
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cool breeze 38 View Post
    PHM
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    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  5. #18
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    Get a big rosebud with the head 3 /4 -7/8" and handle for it. You will use it even on smaller copper in the wind.

  6. #19
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    What the hell are we talking about here?

    Glen's post asked about test pressures for oxygen and acetylene piping of some kind. Didn't it? <g>

    There was nothing about using a torch or anything like that . . . was there?

    PHM
    ---------


    Quote Originally Posted by servicefitter View Post
    Get a big rosebud with the head 3 /4 -7/8" and handle for it. You will use it even on smaller copper in the wind.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  7. #20
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    It's in the title of the thread.


    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    What the hell are we talking about here?

    Glen's post asked about test pressures for oxygen and acetylene piping of some kind. Didn't it? <g>

    There was nothing about using a torch or anything like that . . . was there?

    PHM
    ---------
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  8. #21
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    Yes.

    Now couple that title with his actual post and it sure seems like he has to install and test O&A piping for a facility who will never braze anything larger than 3" copper. Or at least test it. Nothing he wrote refers to Him brazing 3" copper.


    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    It's in the title of the thread.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  9. #22
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    Yeah, pretty sure my first post in this thread started out with: I'm confused.

    I can't imagine running acetylene through piping in a building. Just too much of a safety risk. Done all the time with oxygen though. I would want my acetylene straight from the tank, maybe two sets of hoses coupled together, but that's about it.


    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Yes.

    Now couple that title with his actual post and it sure seems like he has to install and test O&A piping for a facility who will never braze anything larger than 3" copper. Or at least test it. Nothing he wrote refers to Him brazing 3" copper.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  10. #23
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    I believe he is asking about brazing 3 copper pipe/fittings. Apparently he is thinking that bigger pipe requires bigger regulator settings.

  11. #24
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    Thread Starter
    Sorry for my confusing boys. A friend of mine who is the manager of facilities of a small state technical college (2,500 students) where trades are taught (HVAC, welding, etc., asked me what the highest expected pressures used for brazing was.

    Well it turns out he wanted to know what is the pressures going from the tanks to the regulators was. Of course that would be about 2,000 psi from the oxygen tank to the regulator and maybe 20 psi for acetylene.

    You see he wanted to know the test requirement for testing. That would be 3,000 psi for the oxygen pipe..

    They are running their pipe from a tank room to several welding stations iin the adjoining lab. Anyhow didn't understand his question at first. Appreciate everyone's input here. Thank you very much.
    "I could have ended the war in a month. I could have made North Vietnam look like a mud puddle."

    "I have little interest in streamlining government or in making it more efficient, for I mean to reduce its size. I do not undertake to promote welfare, for I propose to extend freedom. My aim is not to pass laws, but to repeal them. It is not to inaugurate new programs, but to cancel old ones that do violence to the Constitution."
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  12. #25
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    You do not ever want acetylene over 15 psig. And probably not over 10 psig to keep it on the safe side. You'd also want pressure relief valves, vented to the outdoors, in case there was a problem.

    The idea is that acetylene can spontaneously combust at over 15 psig. Which is why you probably don't want to have any part of this job.


    Quote Originally Posted by glennac View Post
    Sorry for my confusing boys. A friend of mine who is the manager of facilities of a small state technical college (2,500 students) where trades are taught (HVAC, welding, etc., asked me what the highest expected pressures used for brazing was.

    Well it turns out he wanted to know what is the pressures going from the tanks to the regulators was. Of course that would be about 2,000 psi from the oxygen tank to the regulator and maybe 20 psi for acetylene.

    You see he wanted to know the test requirement for testing. That would be 3,000 psi for the oxygen pipe..

    They are running their pipe from a tank room to several welding stations iin the adjoining lab. Anyhow didn't understand his question at first. Appreciate everyone's input here. Thank you very much.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

    I use 56% silver on everything except steel.

    Did you really need the " If you were a real tech " ??

  13. #26
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    Probably not even allowed to run acetylene throughout a building. Small leak and a small spark would equal a big bang.

    I have seen a picture of what was left of an HVAC service van that had a leaking acetylene bottle in it and blew up when the remote locks were activated. They found one of the ladders on the roof of a house two doors down....
    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    Yeah, pretty sure my first post in this thread started out with: I'm confused.

    I can't imagine running acetylene through piping in a building. Just too much of a safety risk. Done all the time with oxygen though. I would want my acetylene straight from the tank, maybe two sets of hoses coupled together, but that's about it.
    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk

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