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  1. #1
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    May 2019
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    Tool condensation

    This time of year there are freezing temperatures outside and my tools that sit in the van all night long develop condensation on them when I bring them into a job. I will pull out my meter and notice condensation on the display, all of this condensation so far has been on the outside but my concern is any condensation building up inside my meter or manometer or drill. Has anyone had any issues with condensation in the winter time damaging their meters, what do you guys do to prevent this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
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    Oklahoma home its in the name
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    I haven't had a problem but my meters and drill ride in a bag on the center console and I have the heat full blast when it is cold out. I drive a Tahoe so I eaven keep the rear on heat then if I get hot I roll the window down and turn the front heat down a tad. So my tools stay plenty warm. Also my refrigerants stay nice and warm just incase I need them. When I get a truck i will keep any sensitive tools in the cab.

    Sent from mars using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Mine have been exposed to condensation for about 35 years, get a little rust on them so you don't look like a rookie.

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  5. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    I had a roll around type tool box bolted to the rear of my OSHA screen in most of my trucks. No wheels but plenty of drawers. I kept my non-LED trouble light in the bottom drawer and whenever it was below about 40-50 outside at night I always plugged it in to the house or the shop.

    Warm tools in the morning, especially on a construction job, will make you think you just went to Work Heaven. Most of my meters lived in the top drawer and I never had moisture problems with them. But I really did it for my hands. <g>

    I learned that trick when I was an auto / motorcycle mechanic. It was easier then because I just left the light on all the time.

    PHM
    ---------

    Quote Originally Posted by jperigo View Post
    This time of year there are freezing temperatures outside and my tools that sit in the van all night long develop condensation on them when I bring them into a job. I will pull out my meter and notice condensation on the display, all of this condensation so far has been on the outside but my concern is any condensation building up inside my meter or manometer or drill. Has anyone had any issues with condensation in the winter time damaging their meters, what do you guys do to prevent this?
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    May 2019
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by EugeneTheJeep View Post
    Mine have been exposed to condensation for about 35 years, get a little rust on them so you don't look like a rookie.
    Not so much worried about the wrenches, pliers and screwdrivers as I am about the digital electronic meters. Read on an electrician forum how a couple of guys have had meters blow-up in their hands due to condensation inside the meter while measuring 480V. Now doing residential most I check is 240V but I guess it could happen. Plus I don't want them to fail due to moisture so was just wondering.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Broomall, PA
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    I take my tool bucket, my case with liquid gauges (for oil-pressure/vacuum), combustion analyzer and both meters out of my van and into the office (or my house) at the end of every day.
    One for the cold (or extreme heat), and 2, they are the most valuable to me and would hate to have to replace them.
    If I do a job in 30 minutes it's because I spent 30 years learning how to do that in 30 minutes. You owe me for the years, not the minutes.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
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    When the weather gets to either extreme, I place all of my sensitive tools (meter, drill/driver, vacuum gauge, etc) in a bucket and take it in the house at the end of the day. The following morning, the bucket is the last thing I put in the truck after letting it heat/coil for a few minutes before heading out for the day.


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  9. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Never had a problem with my fluke meters, and my H10 rides in the cab for the winter.

    OTOH, Fieldpiece, those things won't work below 20 degrees, and yes I do need to use it for outdoors.

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