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Thread: Floor heating

  1. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbhenergy View Post
    I’m going for warm feet. Tile is cold in the winter on my old body.


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    That's not how radiant works. If the sun was beating on the tile, would it be warm or cold?
    If I do a job in 30 minutes it's because I spent 30 years learning how to do that in 30 minutes. You owe me for the years, not the minutes.

  2. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by STEVEusaPA View Post
    That's not how radiant works. If the sun was beating on the tile, would it be warm or cold?
    Ill give you my "drinking my cowboy lost blues away" smart ass answer..... with my new windows I put in, the sun shinning in on the floor does not make much difference. BUT, in my font room, where I have a south facing 10x5 1964 window, when the sun shines on it, it is warmer than the floor in the next room over.

  3. #16
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    A helper with a shop vac hose end in each hand will also work.

    If you use long hoses the shop vacs can be outside / can discharge outside.

    I fairly often use a water trap for dust: a five gallon plastic bucket with a lid. Two 2" male adapters through the lid - one with a stub extending to 3" above the bottom of the bucket as the inlet. The other one (outlet) just the lid fitting. Fill the bucket 1/3 with water.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbhenergy View Post
    They make some slick attachments for angle grinders that all but eliminates the dust. I have thought of the option of doing that. Not ruled it out completely at this point.


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    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  4. #17
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    ok....I FINALLY get to give an answer on something I really KNOW about. I have installed countless tile floors, and have put radiant heat in many of them. First off, without tearing the slab out and re-pouring it with the tubing in place it's pointless to even talk about using hot water to do it. Installing tile alone, on a slab, you need to assume 1/2" of rise. 1/4" for the mortar and 1/4" for the tile. Try to put tubing under that and now you are going to add AT LEAST another 3/4"-1". This makes the entry into the bathroom a tripping hazard, no mater what kind of transition you use.

    The suggestion to grind the floor down is a GIANT mistake. Even with the nifty grinder attachments and a good shop vac (I have BOTH) you will wind up with dust EVERYWHERE in your house. Had to pay a maid service to clean a customer's house after we ground off the mortar, from previous tile, from the slab. And yes...we had bathroom sealed off with plastic, tape, etc...

    My professional advice would be to use Schluter's DITRA XL uncoupling mat and SunTouch's "Warm Wire" kit. The DITRA is put on top of the slab with a very thin layer of mortar. Once that goes down the "Warm Wire" snaps into the mat. The tile then gets installed over that. Your total rise in floor thickness is approximately 3/4". Just keep in mind that you don't need to heat under the toilet or under the vanity, just where you are going to walk.

    I won't go into any more installation details is this post, but if you have other questions feel free to ask. Happy to help in any way I can.

    www.suntouch.com for the Warm Wire kits and any you can get the DITRA XL from a lot of different suppliers.


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  5. #18
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    I wouldn't go with electric. I haven't been around very long (50 years), but in my short time I have seen MANY electric heat cables fail. PEX tubing, when buried in concrete, has a 200+ year life expectancy. What happens when your heat wire fails?

    I do like the idea of radiant ceiling. Remember, radiant heat heats the objects/surfaces in the room, no matter where the heat is coming from. Up above, down below or from the side. In fact, go with radiant walls and when you climb into the shower it will be like you're back in the womb!
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  6. #19
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    You heard the answer I received when I suggested it. Maybe you'll do better as you explained it better..
    If I do a job in 30 minutes it's because I spent 30 years learning how to do that in 30 minutes. You owe me for the years, not the minutes.

  7. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by doc havoc View Post
    I wouldn't go with electric. I haven't been around very long (50 years), but in my short time I have seen MANY electric heat cables fail. PEX tubing, when buried in concrete, has a 200+ year life expectancy. What happens when your heat wire fails?
    Yes....I agree completely that circulating water is the BEST way to accomplish what he wants. BUT, as I stated in my first paragraph, it is pointless to even think about trying to add the tubing without tearing the slab out and re-pouring it.

    I have also seen many electric systems fail, and in my experience I have found that in most cases the failure happens because it was not installed properly. Most commonly people try to heat the entire floor instead of just the traffic areas, or they place the wire paths too close together which overheats them. They put too much wire in too small an area. The kits come in 10 sq.ft., 20 sq.ft., 30 sq.ft., etc. and you need to get only what you need instead of rounding up. If you have 25 sq.ft. then you need to get the 20, and NOT the 30.

    The other thing people get wrong about electric systems is the fact that they do NOT make the floor "warm". They are only designed to make the floor "not COLD". This is another reason they fail, the homeowner turns the thermostat all the way up and leaves it on all the time, which winds up burning the unit out trying to make the floor warm.

  8. #21
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    Problem solved for about $10 bucks !
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  9. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Problem solved for about $10 bucks !
    Sold. I’m the worlds cheapest man so this fits my budget perfect.


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