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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
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    Goodman coil in Rheem HVAC

    When I bought my house 6 years ago, I had a homeowners warranty. I still do, but plan to not renew.
    My home is almost 23 years old. I replaced the downstairs HVAC a year and a half ago, and just replaced the upstairs unit a few days ago. The original systems were Rheem.
    The tech who was part of the team who did the installation of the new system told me that there was a Goodman coil in the upstairs Rheem AC. The AC failed about 5 years ago, and the HW replaced the coil.
    Is it best practice to use a Goodman coil on a Rheem system? How would it affect performance and efficiency to do this? The tech said he thought it was an iffy fix. I am just curious, since I now have new HVAC systems.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
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    What do you expect from a warranty company?

    They replaced the evaporator and the system died 5 years later!

    How would it effect performance is anyone's guess but I can guarantee it never worked as designed.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
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    On today's higher efficiency units, matched coils are lots more critical. But as pecmsg said, what do you expect...

    Probably wouldn't affect the life, may mess with SEER and capacity a bit. But 23 year old unit was likely 10 SEER so not as critical as today.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    New England
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    OK so I’m reading it that the upstairs unit has a 5 year old Goodman coil and a new Rheem OD unit, if so make sure to register the OD unit to receive the maximum manufacturers warranty as if never registered it will decreases significantly. Did anyone register your Goodman coil initially, as if so you probably would get a 10 year warranty on it.

    So you got a somewhat Frankenstein system IMO, but there are tons of them in the real world, chugging along. I think it should be a close match, as depending where you reside you could have a 13 SEER OD unit with a 13 SEER ID coil. Or probably worst case a 14 SEER OD unit to a 13-14 SEER ID coil.

    What’s the experience level of the Tech. who said it’s a iffy situation, a somewhat newbie to the profession or a very seasoned pretty much seen it all Tech. as to me that would hold more weight in thinking about what this person just said.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
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    Sounded to me like a Goodman coil was put on an old Rheem outdoor unit by the warranty company. Could have understood it wrong.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
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    30
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by BaldLoonie View Post
    Sounded to me like a Goodman coil was put on an old Rheem outdoor unit by the warranty company. Could have understood it wrong.
    It was the indoor unit and it was still “chugging” along. I wanted to get a more efficient and reliable system. I should probably have waited to replace the HVAC, but electricity bills were larger than they should have been in the summer. If I sell my house in a year or two, a very old HVAC system could slow a sale in my area. I don’t think that the company registered the coil. The outdoor compressor for the upstairs unit was the original Rheem from 1997. The upstairs furnace was the original from 1997.
    I replaced my downstairs HVAC in 5/18. Most of the people in my neighborhood replaced both systems, upstairs and downstairs, when they needed one replaced.

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