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  1. #1
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    Human Error in Hvac

    Hey guys, just wanted to see what everyone thought about Human Error in the trade. From my experience I would say almost half of the service calls I go to are from bad installs, or wrong parts, or wrong wiring that someone did, or belts alighted wrong, or someone overcharged a system or pushed the wrong switch, or sized the system wrong or installed with too small of ductwork etc. Or some other type of hacking of the system..... I find it fascinating. I feel more like a detective sometimes rather than a troubleshooter. Also I feel like the equipment gets a bad wrap a lot more than it should. The real issue is humans. Need better training where the Journeyman is on site with apprentice? Thoughts?

  2. #2
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    .
    PHM
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    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  3. #3
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    YES!

    PHM
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    Quote Originally Posted by Parksy View Post
    Hey guys, just wanted to see what everyone thought about Human Error in the trade. From my experience I would say almost half of the service calls I go to are from bad installs, or wrong parts, or wrong wiring that someone did, or belts alighted wrong, or someone overcharged a system or pushed the wrong switch, or sized the system wrong or installed with too small of ductwork etc. Or some other type of hacking of the system..... I find it fascinating. I feel more like a detective sometimes rather than a troubleshooter. Also I feel like the equipment gets a bad wrap a lot more than it should. The real issue is humans. Need better training where the Journeyman is on site with apprentice? Thoughts?
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  4. #4
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    I think all equipment is garbage these days. Coupled with human error, and you have a real shitshow out there. Most gof my service calls are due to failed parts and neglect.
    “Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery.”

  5. #5
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    I find most errors to be done by folk who just dont care due to feeling like they are being under paid and or over worked/ treated unfairly and so on. These are the reasons this is becoming a dieing trade, but that's for another thread.
    I find more careless mistakes then inexperienced and it sucks. The industry has this it should be done in x amount of time its rediculous.

    Sent from my LG-G710 using Tapatalk

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  7. #6
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    It is harder for a younger techs to get training these days compared to many years ago. Which is ironic because it is needed more today than before. They are usually thrown to the wolves before they are ready.

    Modern equipment is less forgiving than the older units. Many older units were cycling off and on via a fan limit for decades where a modern will shut itself down. If the same mistake is made today the homeowner will know about it where before they probably wouldn't.

    I would not say that the reason for the majority of my service calls were due to human error at all although I could usually find something else to correct many times due to human error.

    Many people want to blame the individual techs but they are usually doing what is asked of them from the top down.
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  8. #7
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    But! Gimme a brake! I make my living from other peoples screw ups. I rely on dopes,hacks!!! And I see my future growing,rapidly!

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  10. #8
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    I would partially agree with this, but younger techs also have easy access to far more research and studying materials due to the internet. Not everything can be learned on the job. Sometimes you have to take initiative and not be lazy and do some homework.
    Quote Originally Posted by pageyjim View Post
    It is harder for a younger techs to get training these days compared to many years ago. Which is ironic because it is needed more today than before. They are usually thrown to the wolves before they are ready.

    Modern equipment is less forgiving than the older units. Many older units were cycling off and on via a fan limit for decades where a modern will shut itself down. If the same mistake is made today the homeowner will know about it where before they probably wouldn't.

    I would not say that the reason for the majority of my service calls were due to human error at all although I could usually find something else to correct many times due to human error.

    Many people want to blame the individual techs but they are usually doing what is asked of them from the top down.
    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk

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  12. #9
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    I do a fair amount of start ups...over half of the equipment has something wrong from the factory. As far as service calls, it’s mostly failed parts. I see some improperly installed stuff but it’s rarely the cause of the failure. I say it’s the equipment...the parts are garbage and the factory workers putting it together don’t take any pride in their work.

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  14. #10
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    The main problem is that the young people who would have become HVAC techs 40 years ago are now being drawn off into other technical fields that are less physically challenging, such as writing code. They don't ever have to leave the basement to make $50,000 a year.

    In order to be able to bring in young people who are capable of doing this job, there is only one needed variable....and that is we need to offer pay that is better than they can get from using their minds someplace else.
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  16. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BALloyd View Post
    I would partially agree with this, but younger techs also have easy access to far more research and studying materials due to the internet. Not everything can be learned on the job. Sometimes you have to take initiative and not be lazy and do some homework.

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk

    Good point to add to what I said. It does not change anything I laid out previously. Of course nobody should be lazy. The average tech of today has spent much more time learning in classroom situations and not on the job itself than in the past. It still doesn't change the fact that most techs today are trying to do what is being pushed on them and expected on them. It usually comes from the top down and this is no exception.
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  17. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    The main problem is that the young people who would have become HVAC techs 40 years ago are now being drawn off into other technical fields that are less physically challenging, such as writing code. They don't ever have to leave the basement to make $50,000 a year.

    In order to be able to bring in young people who are capable of doing this job, there is only one needed variable....and that is we need to offer pay that is better than they can get from using their minds someplace else.
    This is true but I do not see it happening. Many people are already being drawn to this trade for better paying jobs. This isn't going to help to raise wages. Unions are not going to make up that difference either as far as numbers are concerned. The trend to make more in this trade is to being a sales tech also.
    Most people want to see their children do better and that doesn't last too long with blue collar jobs. It is quite common for people in this trade to start getting bad backs and knees in their 40's who wants that for their children?
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  18. #13
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    Contractors and especially small contractors are profit driven and whats sad if they work in the trade they think everyone walks on water except them. I was fortunate to work for a mechanical contractor when i was hired not to make money but save money doing startup work. Also worked for 18 months for AFCO that was purchased by Singer. 21 factory servicemen did only work on our equipment. Oh i did screw up and my boss at it.

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