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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Portland, Or
    Posts
    289
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    Thread Starter
    I knew I was guessing wrong lol. Thank you for the 411. Thanks everyone for the help

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Portland, Or
    Posts
    289
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    Thread Starter
    EXACTLY.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Portland, Or
    Posts
    289
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    Thread Starter
    Thanks Rovert. How did you find out it’s running at 90,000 btu’s? Check the specs on the burner along with nozzle size? Appreciate the education ���� THANKS

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    27,165
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    139,000 times 0.65 Does Not Equal 65,000.

    PHM
    ---------



    divided
    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman_pdx View Post
    Yup .65 70 w and 100# pressure. Don’t tell me it’s 65,000. Back in the day I used to work on these, now we just take oil furnaces and switch to a different fuel, and back in the day I could remember shit lol. 3td one I’ve worked on in 10 years. Thanks everyone
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Ct
    Posts
    11
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    I'm with PHM on the formula for input BTUs, but in my area (I think oil furnaces in general) gas furnaces are rated in input, oil furnaces by output. So, multiply your nozzle size x 139,000 = input. Input x efficiency = output.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    14
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    .65 (65%) times 144,000 (btu's per gal) =93,600 Btu's per hour, if it was constantly firing.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    27,165
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    You seem to have now joined me in feeling fully qualified to state the obvious. Yes; very few heating appliances produce heat - except during their on-cycle. <g>

    So yes: "per hour of run time".

    Oh! Is fuel oil actually 144,000 BTU's per gallon? What was I thinking of with the 139K number? Gasoline maybe? If so; I stand humbly corrected.

    PHM
    -------


    Quote Originally Posted by george3 View Post
    .65 (65%) times 144,000 (btu's per gal) =93,600 Btu's per hour, if it was constantly firing.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Elizabethtown, PA
    Posts
    97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post

    Oh! Is fuel oil actually 144,000 BTU's per gallon? What was I thinking of with the 139K number? Gasoline maybe? If so; I stand humbly corrected.

    PHM
    -------
    I've always used 139,000.

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