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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    22
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    How does a whole home dehumidifier work?

    Finally coming around to this idea. Except I'm not a house but rather a condo.

    At any rate how does this work? I don't quite understand how it can operate yet neither heat nor cool the air. I don't believe they are split units so where does the heat from the compressor go?

    Thank you as always

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    3,729
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    It does heat slightly. Compressor heat goes back into the supply air outlet.
    "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing" Socrates

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
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    9,700
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    Yes, the heat from the moisture removal process is added to the home. First off, a well setup a/c should be able to maintain <50%RH during peak cooling loads. If not, the a/c air flow can be adjusted to remove more moisture. Expect 3 lbs. of moisture removal per ton per hour. Two ton of a/c removes 6 lbs. per hour, almost a gallon per hour.
    But you will need supplemental dehumidification during evenings and rainy days.
    Also consider that a high efficiency dehumidifier like the Ultra-Air 70H removes 3 lbs. per hour while adding about 6,000 btus of heat back into the home. This reheat increases the run time of the a/c which will in turn will remove more moisture.
    The starting point is get your a/c running ideally and than add a high efficiency dehumidifier to your a/c in a way that makes it efficient and compatible with your a/c.
    We will help you and your a/c tech throw this process.
    Keep us posted on your issues.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    9,801
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    Heat Addition with Moisture Removal

    Quote Originally Posted by teddy bear View Post

    Yes, the heat from the moisture removal process is added to the home.

    First off, a well setup a/c should be able to maintain <50% R.H. during peak cooling loads.
    If not, the a/c air flow can be adjusted to remove more moisture.
    Expect 3 lbs. of moisture removal per ton per hour.

    Two ton of a/c removes 6 lbs. per hour, almost a gallon per hour.

    But you will need supplemental dehumidification during evenings and rainy days.

    Also consider that a high efficiency dehumidifier
    like the Ultra-Air 70H removes 3 lbs. per hour

    while adding about 6,000 BTUs/HR of heat back into the home.

    This reheat increases the run time of the a/c which will in turn will remove more moisture.

    The starting point is get your a/c running ideally and then
    add a high efficiency dehumidifier to your a/c in a way that makes it efficient and compatible with your a/c.

    We will help you and your a/c tech through this process.

    Keep us posted on your issues.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Power: 580 Watts = 1,979 BTU/HR
    C.O.P. ___ ?

    How does the model 70H actually add upto 6,000 BTU/HR?

    Are you presuming a Ventilating Dehumidifier ?
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    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    9,700
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan sw fl View Post
    Power: 580 Watts = 1,979 BTU/HR
    C.O.P. ___ ?

    How does the model 70H actually add upto 6,000 BTU/HR?

    Are you presuming a Ventilating Dehumidifier ?
    Good question.
    Each lb. of moisture removed is 1,050 btus of condensing energy. Plust the electricity converted to heat, 580 watts X 3.4 btus = 5,129 btus per hour, +-.
    Close enough?
    Keep in mind that if the a/c is maintaining 50%RH, no dehumidifier is needed. Another benefit is that on a rainy cool day when the outdoor temperature below the desire indoor, Every degree the indoor temperature is raise, the indoor %RH is decreased +2%RH. Verses trying to control the %RH by over-cooling with a/c, which increases the indoor %RH by +2%RH per degree that the indoor temperatue is lowered. This is a big negative of over-cooling for %RH control. As you cool the home below the outdoor dew point, more moisture condenses on the cooled surfaces of the home.
    Thanks for bringing the value of heat and the amount up.
    Your help is makes this HVAC Talk more informative.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

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