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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The very humid south
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    Air Purification???

    Hey guys. I'm about to install a new air handler in my home. I currently have a Rheem RHLL with the Rheem air cleaner. However the RHLL is only 9 years old & I'm on my 2nd coil & its now leaking. Not to mention this thing is FULL of "UIPM" aka MOLD... I don't feel the Rheem air cleaner is doing anything except filtering larger particles. I could be wrong though....

    I do suffer with pretty bad sinus/allergy issues & battle pretty bad dust issues in the house. I will likely be installing a GAM5 in its place. I'm in need of recommendations for air purifiers?? Clean Effects, Apriaire 5000, or some Honeywell, etc... Any input is greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    24,810
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    You need a properly sized and installed system. Mold is from oversized equipment on undersized ducts, not enough run time to dry the air!

    The filter on the HVAC equipment is to protect the equipment, A media filter system helps but MUST be sized properly!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The very humid south
    Posts
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    Thread Starter
    I am well versed in ACCA Manual J,D & S. I live in the swamps of SE Louisiana where the humidity is 197% on a good day... The RH in my house never ever exceeds 45-50%, that's single stage with a X13 blower no VS, no DEHUM. The equipment is however in my attic where, I don't care how one sizes their system or ductwork the system will condensate.

    I'm just asking recommendations/thoughts on different filter systems...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    9,633
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    Top indoor air quality in a home starts with a fresh air change in 4-5 hours to purge indoor pollutants and renew oxygen at a minimum when occupied. When the outdoor dew point is 50-55^F and the fresh air is blended into the home air, filtered by 13 merv air filter, the fresh air change alone will purge the indoor pollutants and the excess moisture from the occupants maintaining 50%Rh when the home is 70-75^F.

    On a hot humid day, your well setup a/c will remove enough moisture while removing the sensible heat to keep the home <50%RH. Your a/c can remove 10 lbs. of moisture per hour dealing with 100 cfm of fresh air and a couple couple lbs. moisture from the occupants.
    Evenings and rainy day are more exciting. You have many hours with no sensible cooling load to make the operate. But you are still left with the 70^F dew point in the fresh air and occupant moisture. Without the a/c running steady, expect the indoor dew point to be near the out outdoor dew point.
    If your home was a hospital, you would need reheat to add enough sensible heat to provide the a/c sensible cooling load to remove the latent moisture. The efficient way to do this is provide a small whole house dehumidifier to remove the excess moisture from the fresh air and occupants while efficiently adding re-heat. In fact now the dehumidifiers have a fresh air ventilation option takes care of blending filtered fresh air with house air and circulating the blend throughout the home via the a/c ducts. Units like the Ultra-Aire whole house units are designed for commercial and residential applications.
    The more modern codes and ACCA are suggesting this concept for the green grass climates to be mated up with the a/c make the home healthy and comfortable.
    Looking forward to hearing your opinion about this.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The very humid south
    Posts
    922
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    Thread Starter
    Thanks Teddy, I was considering an ERV. However like you mentioned a ventilating DHUM would make more sense. I’ll likely take your advice & do a venting dehum with just a basic media filter.

    What’s your thoughts on UV lights??

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    9,633
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajbeck21 View Post
    Thanks Teddy, I was considering an ERV. However like you mentioned a ventilating DHUM would make more sense. I’ll likely take your advice & do a venting dehum with just a basic media filter.

    What’s your thoughts on UV lights??
    No need for UV unless your fresh air has a pollutant that needs to be controlled by UV.
    With adequate fresh air change to purge indoor pollutants and renew oxygen, filtering spores/pollen/dust is all that is needed.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    1,253
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    Think you have a air infiltration problem and a unit that has enough capacity to keep up. Blower door test would tell you how tight the house is and the duct work. Hows the attic ventilation?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The very humid south
    Posts
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    Thread Starter
    I am BPI Certified however I never invested the $$$ to purchase the blower door or the duct blast. I do live in a newer home with new high end windows. I don't feel like air filtration is major issue. However I would agree you never know until you test it & see... The attic is well vented, which its been my experience that in itself can cause major issues with equipment & duct condensation.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    1,253
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    Alot of electric companies offer a energy audit that includes a blower door test mine charges $50 gave me over $50 in light bulbs, caulking and other stuff.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    24
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    The quality of a air in a duct system house is always lower and most of the time the humidity issues are found. You also have sinus problem and your central HVAC will aggravate it. You yourself is a professional and knows that ductless system provides a better air quality and also dehumidifies, then why don't you switch to ductless HVAC for your bedroom only so it can be easier for your allergies.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The very humid south
    Posts
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by CoolAir Inc. View Post
    The quality of a air in a duct system house is always lower and most of the time the humidity issues are found. You also have sinus problem and your central HVAC will aggravate it. You yourself is a professional and knows that ductless system provides a better air quality and also dehumidifies, then why don't you switch to ductless HVAC for your bedroom only so it can be easier for your allergies.
    Is this a JOKE???

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Summerville SC
    Posts
    41
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    Your ducts are sweating in the attic , you’re blowing evap coils , and mold issues.
    Heat pump , right ?
    Your duct work is probably sized wrong and static pressure is off, delta T in cooling must be too high and too low SA temps causing sweating in cool and high pressures in heat , if heat pump.
    I live in SC lowcountry and see a lot of 98% humidity. My ducts do not sweat a bead in the summer in the attic . 20 year old dehum carrier system but I replaced and balanced duct work when I installed it.
    If I were you , I would replace all the duct work sized properly and start from fresh with a new system. Pleated filter in a properly sized return grill or two is all you need . Fresh air intake in a high humidity area is just food for growth.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,285
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    One of the Best things I did on my Home unit is to install UV in the Return Duct. I did a lot of research, and chose a SanuvoxR+ unit, due to their Three year Lamp life. That's Three years of run time on the Lamp, which it keeps track of. Also I had the Filter Channel and filter door made for a Two inch pleated Filter. BTW you can manually check the Lamp by unplugging the unit, wiping it with a Cotton ball dampened with Isopropyl. If it comes up dirty, the Lamp has failed.
    Retired, after 43 Years

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