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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
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    14
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    Thread Starter
    Also, Thanks a lot Bob for the time you've taken to offer your expertise! It's greatly appreciated! You and everyone else!

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    26,334
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    Search and get 1 or 2 “ Low Level” CO detectors.
    The ones sold in stores are worthless!

  3. #16
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    40,603
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    Gotta look at the National Fuel Gas Code tables to know if single wall or double wall is required to the furnace. Definitely in a cold space but in a basement, depends on BTUs, flue size & height.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Athens, Ohio
    Posts
    7,208
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    From what can be seen in the pictures, the installers are stupid. Though I see no immediate danger signs, we cannot see what other mistakes they made. Hire a real contractor to check it out and do a combustion analysis.
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  5. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    1,287
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    The CO detectors from the store will only alert at a deadly level. Do not trust them. A low level CO monitor will alert you when any CO is present.
    Believe it or not, the pictures look like a better than average install. The flue pipes can be a complicated thing. The condensation in the flue is a warning sign that it's not correct. Is the flue/ chimney a common (more than 1 appliance venting into)? Many installs DO require the entire flue be in type B vent. All of the "instructions" for flues are in the GAMA tables, where btu totals, lengths, height, connector length and rise, size and type of materials all go into the formulas. 80% furnaces typically do not condense the flue, and should be repaired. I'd recommend calling around and see if any heating contractors in your area are familiar with the GAMA tables. That might help weed out another contractor that doesn't know how to fix it properly. The CO detectors that only alarm at a deadly level are generally $20-40, where a CO monitor will run $100 plus.
    There are two ways to do things, Right and Again.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Posts
    14
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    Thread Starter
    Thanks everyone. This was all very helpful! The CO detector I ordered was $30, but tells you in ppm the amounts in the air. However, the instructions even say that it will only sound the alarm at deadly levels. What I want to see is if there's anything floating around at all right now so I can at least do my part in letting her know and getting my kids the heck out of here. If she's fine with the install there isn't much I can do. I'll show her this thread and hopefully that will help.

    Thanks again for all of your time! I know it's important.

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