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  1. #1
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    Nov 2019
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    Does This Installation Look Correct?

    Hey everyone!

    My mother just had some guys replace part of her flue pipe which is b-vent. She hired some random guy to install the furnace a few years ago and he did it incorrectly. When he did the install, the flue leaving the furnace was small and was not b-vent. The smaller pipe just went up into the b-vent and that's it.

    The system is leaking from the cap, but only when it's cold outside and only when the furnace turns off. My thought is the air isn't hot enough to dissipate properly which is causing condensation. I told her that isn't normal and the problem may likely lie in the fact the furnace was installed incorrectly.

    She didn't believe me and hired another random guy (not a licensed company) to come replace it. He told her the water leak is fine and that he'll put something there to catch the water and the heat from the furnace will just burn it away. I'm no pro but that sounds like nonsense to me.

    He also just took the larger, 4" b-vent and just put it over the older smaller, non b-vent pipe. He also didn't use any fasteners but used RTV sealant to attach the pieces. I put a carbon monoxide detector about 20 feet from the furnace room but I don't trust that thing either.

    This install was done today. I tried to post pics but it wouldn't let me.

    Thanks for your help,
    Chris

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
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    Indianapolis, IN, USA
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    Doesn't sound right. I don't recall how many posts you need before you can put pictures up. You can put them on Flickr or other picture page and link to them.

  3. #3
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    Oct 2009
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    God's country - Shenandoah Valley, VA
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    It's probably flue gas condensation which is usually cause by an over-sized vent or chimney.

    Please tell me that the new furnace is NOT a 90%+.

    Not to be unkind, but this is what happens when you hire incompetent, unlicensed hacks.

    You have a potentially dangerous situation that could be life threatening. Get a COMPETENT pro out there immediately. CO poisoning is not something to take lightly.
    Bob Boan


    ​You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.

  4. #4
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by bobboan View Post
    It's probably flue gas condensation which is usually cause by an over-sized vent or chimney.

    Please tell me that the new furnace is NOT a 90%+.

    Not to be unkind, but this is what happens when you hire incompetent, unlicensed hacks.

    You have a potentially dangerous situation that could be life threatening. Get a COMPETENT pro out there immediately. CO poisoning is not something to take lightly.

    That's exactly what I think it is too. The furnace is an 80%.

    Also, you aren't being unkind at all! I agree! I've been telling her the same thing! Now it's going to cost even MORE, had she done it correctly the first time, there would be no problem.

    She says she's happy with the installation so she refuses to do anything else about it. Once I get to 7 posts the forum will allow me to post pictures.

    Thanks for your time and response.

  5. #5
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    Aug 2002
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    Southold, NY
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    One way is to contact the local Fire Department and explain what your seeing, they may wish to inspect for possible CO issues.

  6. #6
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    Nov 2019
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by pecmsg View Post
    One way is to contact the local Fire Department and explain what your seeing, they may wish to inspect for possible CO issues.
    That's a brilliant idea! Thanks! I'm also at 7 posts now so I can put up the pics. Give me a sec to get the links again.

  7. #7
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    Nov 2019
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    Thread Starter
    So here are the pics. I can take more if you need.








  8. #8
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    Nov 2006
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    Athens, Ohio
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    I do not see any pictures.
    AOP Rules: Rules For Equipment Owners.

    Free online load calculator: http://www.loadcalc.net/


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    Questions should end with a question mark "?" Statements end with a period "."

  9. #9
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    Nov 2019
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    Apparently I can't link from one drive. Here are the pics from imgur.
    http://imgur.com/a/9ieuXD0

  10. #10
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    Sep 2007
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    Is there a cap on the bottom of the tee?
    UA Local 32 retired as of Jan 2020

  11. #11
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    Nov 2019
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by buford View Post
    Is there a cap on the bottom of the tee?
    Yes, there's a cap on it.

  12. #12
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    Oct 2009
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    Unless I'm mistaken (I was once, then I found out I wasn't), the IMC does not require B vent all the way to the appliance, just into the room where the appliance is. However, if it's run all the way to the appliance, it must be done according to code and the manufacture's instructions (the pipe manufacture as well as the appliance manufacture).

    They make an adaptor to connect B vent to the furnace vent collar.

    The 6" B vent stack is too large for the furnace (like almost 4 times) and may cause improper venting (or lack thereof) and also flue gas condensation which is acidic and will rot out the flue.

    The furnace should also have had the gas manifold pressure set with a manometer and the blower speed adjusted to assure the temperature rise was within spec for that model and size.

    If those things are not correct, that could also cause flue gas condensation which again can rot the flue and the heat exchanger out.

    RTV is not necessary on B vent since the pipe should be in a negative pressure if done correctly.

    Did this have a permit and an inspection? I think we both know the answer.
    Bob Boan


    ​You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.

  13. #13
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    Nov 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobboan View Post
    Unless I'm mistaken (I was once, then I found out I wasn't), the IMC does not require B vent all the way to the appliance, just into the room where the appliance is. However, if it's run all the way to the appliance, it must be done according to code and the manufacture's instructions (the pipe manufacture as well as the appliance manufacture).

    They make an adaptor to connect B vent to the furnace vent collar.

    The 6" B vent stack is too large for the furnace (like almost 4 times) and may cause improper venting (or lack thereof) and also flue gas condensation which is acidic and will rot out the flue.

    The furnace should also have had the gas manifold pressure set with a manometer and the blower speed adjusted to assure the temperature rise was within spec for that model and size.

    If those things are not correct, that could also cause flue gas condensation which again can rot the flue and the heat exchanger out.

    RTV is not necessary on B vent since the pipe should be in a negative pressure if done correctly.

    Did this have a permit and an inspection? I think we both know the answer.

    Bob, you bring up excellent points. First, the appliance is in a room in the basement, and when this new furnace was installed (by some random dude) he had a smaller vent (not sure what type but it wasn't b) going into the b-vent. So that was wrong just like you said. Now these new random guys just put b-vent over the other vent and told her that they took the old vent out. Which if you just pull the panel off you'll see it's the same (3"?) circle and that's now just completely covered by b-vent.

    You also confirm what i was trying to tell her. He says he put the tee there to catch the condensation and that the heat from the furnace will just burn it up, lol. I told her, it shouldn't have any condensation period. I mean, I get it, I'm not a certified HVAC person, but common sense to me says, that if it didn't do that before, it shouldn't do it after someone "repairs" it.

    While I know it's hard to tell form the pics the b-vent is actually 4" and I'm assuming (I have no idea) that the flue coming from the new 80% furnace was 3".

    And to your last comment. We both know the answer indeed.

    My question is will my kids die. I have t carbon monoxide detector down there and so far there's nothing. But I personally don't want to take any risks. It's also freezing here now and no one wants to get on the roof to replace this entire flue. While her flue is 18 years old, her's is more rusted than everyone else's in the neighborhood and that's probably because of the improper install and the over-sized flue from when she replaced the furnace a few years ago. It's maybe rotting it out quicker perhaps?

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