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  1. #14
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    Jul 2018
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    Thread Starter
    Teddy, the 70H is rated for 1800 sq ft. The house is around 2500. Wouldn't the 98H be the right fit?
    first installer is coming out shortly to take a look. I will report back, I printed out some documentation to give him. I HATE suggesting to a professional "what to do", because im not the HVAC guy, he is...

    If you have a suggestion for local installer in central / shore points NJ, please shoot me a PM

  2. #15
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    Jul 2018
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    Jersey Shore
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    Thread Starter
    first installer is on board with whole house dehumidifier, and is strongly suggesting to "try it first" without fresh air. Then if it still feels uncomfortable, to add the fresh air "complications" later. They would rather not saw through the side of the house. I have a no longer-in-use utility chimney, I thought an option would be to put a 6" sleeve in the chimney and suck the air in from up there but he didnt like that idea either haha what do i know

    He said most people just live through the stuffy seasonal transition because its brief, but said he did the installation of one on his bosses house, that he did not use fresh air option. He said they do some but not many of this type of install.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
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    There is a lot of "Just live with it going on".
    Fresh air is most benefical during the three mild seasons of the year. No wind or stack effect to make fresh air pass through the home removing pollutants and renewing oxygen.
    Important to install the dehumidifier return connect to the open part of the home and fresh air. The dehumidifier supply is connected to the a/c supply to circulate the filtered air via the a/c supply ducts.
    Keep us posted.
    Check out the Ultra-Aire line.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
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    Jersey Shore
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    Thread Starter
    Ok I've had 3 guys out here. The best one by far was the guy Teddy suggested, a local owner/operator. The two other guys, one was a bit unfamiliar, the other was pretty apathetic.

    The guy today (owner/operator), said he is going to give me two options. An estimate for dehumidifier ducted to the return, with a fresh air baffle (sounded to me like it would be manually operated baffle, cracked open).

    He also suggested something to me that I did not think of. If the basement and crawlspaces are getting humid that the humidity is seeping into the living space through leaky (1990s) duct work in the basement. He said I may want a dehumidifier in the basement / crawlspaces, thus would make the house more comfortable.

    The basement is dry, and on a cold dry day, it's 30% RH (or less) down there. During the transitional months I don't see it much higher than 40%-50%, it doesn't strike me as being a big source of humidity and stuffy air upstairs, but I'm not going to discount his suggestion completely.

    My gut is telling me to stick with plan A, as that's the space we are living in.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
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    My experience is the that the stuffy air and high %RH is a 3 mild seasons of the problem. With cold outside air and winter wind, most home get enough fresh air. If anything they have so much dry flowing through that the problems is usually that they are too dry. Your extremely air tight home may need a small amount of fresh air year around. If the windows show signs of condensation, continue enough fresh air ventilation to keep the windows from dripping until spring.
    Next spring, the fresh air ventilation should continue whenever the home is occupied and maintain <50%RH.
    There are several ways to install a whole house dehumidifier into a home. The preferred way is to have the dehu next to the a/c with a return from the open part of the home combined with a fresh air inlet from outside connected to the dehumidifier. The dehu output is connected to the a/c supply duct. This allows operating the dehu without the a/c blower operating. This important. A small supply to the basement/crawlspace from the dehu supply will handle the basement space. Of course a dehumidifier in the basement will help the home, but we want fresh air and humidity control throughout the home.
    Keep us posted on how this works.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  6. #19
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    Jul 2018
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    Thread Starter
    I agree Teddy, its just a transitional thing... In the winter when the humidity levels plummet into the teens the system uses a conventional humidifier to maintain around 28-32% RH indoors. And is cycling enough that everything feels comfortable. Same thing in mid summer.

    which leads me to the next detail, can you suggest a thermostat that can control a humidifier and a ventilated dehumidifier all attached to the same system? My ecoobee4 cannot do both accessories. I like the convenience of having an all in one control at a central location rather than separate humidisat installed into the duct down in the basement. But im not sure if this is possible.

    One of the techs also mentioned a "air exchanger" as an option, but i felt like that would not condition the air if the outside air is in the 60's and humid.

  7. #20
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    Jun 2003
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    I like simple, you need fresh air on/off when occupied and %RH for the dehumidifier. If the home is occupied most of the time, leaving the fresh air on is OK. If you have a routine occupancy, a schedule timer could control the fresh air ventilation. During cold windy weather, mechanical fresh air is usually not needed, could be off.
    I would keep the humidifier on your thermostat. The Ultra-Aire DEH3000 controller has a schedule timer and %RH control. So either on/off fresh air switch and a dehumidistat of the DEH3000.
    You probably do not need a dehumidifier any more this year and can wait till spring.
    Keep us posted.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
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    Jersey Shore
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    Thread Starter
    another update... the project has taken a sharp turn off course. This project lead me into a discussion about my 30 year old sheetmetal trunk lines that are lined with interior fiberglass insulation. I ended up getting them tested by a lab, and sure enough they came up with all sorts of mold including black mold.

    I am going to have about 150 feet of trunk lines removed and replaced, and will have him plumb for the dehumidifier with fresh air intake mix when he installs the new trunk lines. Will report back as things progress.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Athens, Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by pecmsg View Post
    you don't run your A/C when its 60° outside you'll be uncomfortable.

    A whole house dehumidifier might cool the air slightly, mostly it dry's the air if the home does cool the heat will come on.
    As I understand it, a dehumidifier ADDS heat from the compressor motor to the air. It doesn’t cool the air.
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  10. #23
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    Aug 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdean1 View Post
    As I understand it, a dehumidifier ADDS heat from the compressor motor to the air. It doesn’t cool the air.
    During the shoulder seasons bringing in outside air the heat will run slightly more. Without outside air, yes the compressor will addBTU’s.

  11. #24
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    Jul 2018
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    Small change of plans again... We are proceeding with replacing all the fiberglass lined trunk lines, this is for my own peace of mind after the mold tests.

    The tech feels the humidity in the house is coming from the crawlspaces, then finding its way up into the living space, since the HVAC system isnt running frequently enough during the transitional months, the humidity doesn't get pulled out. So we are putting a dehumidifier in each crawlspace 'wing', each one is about 1400 sq ft. He is confident by keeping the humidity low in the basement, it will lower the humidity in the living space.

    When I told him I would still like some fresh air brought into the house, he said he is going to install an HRV system. After reading about them I think this could be a good solution.

    One thing lead to another this turned into a HUGE job.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Teddy Bear--That informaion should fix him right up. Sometimes I just ad a 4 inch fresh air pipe right in to the return with a damper
    Blue Fox

  13. #26
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    Jun 2003
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    Two dehumidifiers and HRV will improve the home. During times of high sensible cooling, the a/c will remove the moisture from the fresh air and occupants. The two dehumidifiers sized right should handle the crawlspace with plastic on the soil and the vents sealed.
    During weather with high dew points and low sensible cooling plus the fresh air ventilation plus moisture from the occupants, the home will be damp. Damp for several days grows mold and dust mites.
    Suggest a small properly sized whole house dehumidifier like the Ultra-Aire 98h or 120 to keep the entire home dry and bring the fresh air. This would include the crawlspaces.
    Also this will provide make-up air for the clothes drier and kitchen exhaust.
    Whatever you do, keep us posted.
    Your need supplemental dehumidification throughout the home during low sensible cooling and high outdoor dew points.
    Regards Teddy Bear
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

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