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Thread: Freezer Drain

  1. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ritchy.wall View Post
    The reason I’m asking, unless you pull another Conductor you heater will only be on during defrost or freeze cycle.
    That’s just the way I have encountered it many times, defrost heater comes on during Defrost, wired to the same terminals as coil defrost heaters and causing drain freeze up problems, especially if insulation quality gets compromised.





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    You're not wiring it to the heaters. It's common on reach ins to energize the drain heater during the defrost. I think this is only done to be energy compliant. There is voltage in your fan circuit roughly 23 hours a day.
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

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  2. Likes ritchy.wall, BALloyd, UmmScott liked this post
  3. #15
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    I like the idea of running the heat tape on the inside of PVC drains

    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

  4. #16
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    I’ve run on the inside of copper drains before. On one job, a large warehouse freezer, I’ve ran two through and hooked up one. That way if one fails, the maintenance guys can hook up the other one.

  5. #17
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    Thread Starter
    Yes this one that brought up this question just had it landing on the evaporator terminal board where the evaporator heaters are landing. The heater is coiled around the drain with pretty tight coils and is very tight on the pipe. then did a thin wrap of foam tape then put 3/4 wall insulation over that. we will just say I really hope im not the one that has to change the heater when it does fail. Sorry to the next guy.

  6. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Man View Post
    I’ve run on the inside of copper drains before. On one job, a large warehouse freezer, I’ve ran two through and hooked up one. That way if one fails, the maintenance guys can hook up the other one.
    Very clever.

    For you guys that run the drain pipe heater all the time, aren't you adding that extra heat load to the evaporator?

  7. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobFrost View Post
    Very clever.

    For you guys that run the drain pipe heater all the time, aren't you adding that extra heat load to the evaporator?
    The heat tape doesnt put out enough BTus to matter. Plus its insulated so the heat should be retained into the drain line, not released into the freezer space

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  8. #20
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    I believe Frost Tex puts out 6 watts per ft at max. Not enough to worry about

  9. #21
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    I used to put heat tape on the outside of the drain line, but lately, we’ve been running all our self-regulating heat tape inside the drains. Sometimes copper, sometimes pvc. Insulate Pipe good, miter your insulation at corners and power up the heat tape all the time.
    If God didn't want us to eat animals... He wouldn't have made them out of MEAT.

  10. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by GenesisRefrig View Post
    I used to put heat tape on the outside of the drain line, but lately, we’ve been running all our self-regulating heat tape inside the drains. Sometimes copper, sometimes pvc. Insulate Pipe good, miter your insulation at corners and power up the heat tape all the time.
    Can I ask how you do this? Are you taking standard Raychem or similar heat cable and just stuffing it thru 3/4 copper or pvc, or you using bigger pipe?

    Do you use a fish tape, or are you able to stuff the cable thru the pipe without it?

    Do you build the drain line first and then stuff the cable thru it, or do you build it little by little and pull the cable thru as you go.

    I am intrigued. Thanks.

  11. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2sac View Post
    I'd go one step further and wire the heater direct to the power for the coil rather than an outlet.

    As far as pvc drains, I'd prefer running the heat tape on the inside of the drain rather than the outside.
    I'm OK with it inside if you also up size the drain line. 3/4 drain with a heat tape inside will plug in short order.

    We always use a 6w tape and run it out to the end and back at 4 o'clock and 8 o'clock on the pipe. Way faster than wrapping and works fine, pipe stays nice and warm. Use 1" wall insulation around it and drill your exit hole in the box large enough to slide the insulated pipe through.

    And yes, hardwire it got all the time, no gfi.

  12. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by GenesisRefrig View Post
    I used to put heat tape on the outside of the drain line, but lately, we’ve been running all our self-regulating heat tape inside the drains. Sometimes copper, sometimes pvc. Insulate Pipe good, miter your insulation at corners and power up the heat tape all the time.
    Get ready for some plugged drain lines, I've had several this year. Ripped it out and put it on the outside with copper pipe.

    Running it inside is not allowed in most chain stores, Walmart, target Kroger etc.

  13. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ammoniadog View Post
    Can I ask how you do this? Are you taking standard Raychem or similar heat cable and just stuffing it thru 3/4 copper or pvc, or you using bigger pipe?

    Do you use a fish tape, or are you able to stuff the cable thru the pipe without it?

    Do you build the drain line first and then stuff the cable thru it, or do you build it little by little and pull the cable thru as you go.

    I am intrigued. Thanks.
    On 1” or larger, we can usually just push (or pull with fish tape) it through. Depends on how long and how many ells. On ”, have to assemble the line and run tape at the same time, as it is difficult to push/pull through the small elbows.

    Others have mentioned that with ” you will have plugged drains, but I’ve never seen it. We started doing heat tape inside after talking to a colleague who has been doing it for many years with great results.
    If God didn't want us to eat animals... He wouldn't have made them out of MEAT.

  14. #26
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