Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    2
    Post Likes

    Confused Oil-to-Gas - Just hooked up NJGAS, relatively new oil boiler, convert? Chimney? [NJ]

    Hello everyone,

    First post on the forum, hoping to get some honest advice here, while I try to filter what contractors/plumbers are telling me in person.

    I live in NJ and I moved into this Cape Cod house 2.5 years ago. The house was a "flip", so the seller redid it from the ground up and renovated everything including plumbing, HVAC, etc.. Great for me when I bought it!

    Natural gas was not available at that time, so they had to install a new oil boiler - Williamson OWB 4-t-s-2, 85% AFUE 145 BTU (I know, definitely too much, given the 1400sqft home and NJ temperatures). I have hot water baseboards. That said, the boiler is 3-year old.

    My water heater is electric and 3-year old as well.

    The town is repaving my street, so the NJGAS basically offered to hook up everyone on the street and of course I took advantage of it.

    Now, here where I am after I did a lot of research and met with 4 contractors this week (plus 2 coming next week):

    1) Given the age of the oil boiler and the not-that-bad AFUE, I think I made up my mind and I'd like to convert the existing boiler to gas. I saw that the Carlin EZ is a common choice and relatively inexpensive ($700, only part);

    2) I want to change the water heater with a similar capacity one. Something solid, but nothing fancy (I did not go too deep with the research on this yet, so I welcome recommendations ... ). If needed to know, I have well water ...

    3) I just don't know what to do with the chimney. Someone said I have to reline it, someone told me I can install a vent, someone told me I don't need to do anything (!!!) ... so I'm at a dead stop and I am really looking for guidance on this.

    Thoughts? Anyone challenging my approach and thinks I should just go all-in with a new boiler?

    P.S. I'm not in a rush, I have 5/8 tank of oil to use ... just the 6-month timeline I have to start using the gas.

    Attached pictures of my utility closet, in case it's helpfulName:  IMG_20191004_180650.jpg
Views: 174
Size:  145.9 KBName:  IMG_20191004_180638.jpg
Views: 168
Size:  88.9 KBName:  IMG_20191004_180630.jpg
Views: 172
Size:  139.2 KBName:  IMG_20191004_180656.jpg
Views: 167
Size:  117.9 KBName:  IMG_20191004_180712.jpg
Views: 172
Size:  55.1 KB

    Thanks everyone!

    Luca

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    5,998
    Post Likes
    Shouldn’t the bidding Contractors know what to do or your local gas company?

    Couple long established reputable power vent companies if that’s what is recommended.

    https://www.fieldcontrols.com/venting/

    http://www.tjernlund.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    24,412
    Post Likes
    Theres a lot of BTU's in boiler.

    Get a properly sized unit!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Broomall, PA
    Posts
    2,722
    Post Likes
    You’ll waste a ton of money with that boiler. Find it a good home.
    Get a properly sized boiler.
    These are a good choice and will do your domestic, and are right in your backyard:
    https://energykinetics.com/
    If I do a job in 30 minutes it's because I spent 30 years learning how to do that in 30 minutes. You owe me for the years, not the minutes.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,023
    Post Likes
    First thing I noticed is that you have 3 zone valves (IE: three thermostats). When you have multiple zones with some of them potentially being small heat loads you want to seriously consider using a modulating boiler. These boilers allow for the boiler to match it's input/output to the size of load it's connected to each time a zone calls for heat instead of only being able to do on and off at full input.

    With the water heater right next to the boiler I would suggest going to an indirect water heat connected to the boiler. An indirect water heater and a high efficient gas boiler you will heat hot water at over 90% efficiency.

    The high efficient boilers vent in PVC venting and the pipe can either use the existing chimney as a chase to exit the building or the contractor can vent them out the side of the home. Unless the existing chimney has a new heavy gauge metal liner in it I would suggest that any new (non-condensing) boiler utilizing normal chimney venting be in stalled with such a liner.

    If the gas company is really strict on the 6 month time line and won't issue a waiver to get you at least past the coming winter I would suggest you connect to the gas and use it for a gas kitchen range, all they are usually looking for is a connection to their service and "some" usage.
    Use the biggest hammer you like, pounding a square peg into a round hole does not equal a proper fit.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    2
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by firecontrol View Post
    First thing I noticed is that you have 3 zone valves (IE: three thermostats). When you have multiple zones with some of them potentially being small heat loads you want to seriously consider using a modulating boiler. These boilers allow for the boiler to match it's input/output to the size of load it's connected to each time a zone calls for heat instead of only being able to do on and off at full input.

    With the water heater right next to the boiler I would suggest going to an indirect water heat connected to the boiler. An indirect water heater and a high efficient gas boiler you will heat hot water at over 90% efficiency.

    The high efficient boilers vent in PVC venting and the pipe can either use the existing chimney as a chase to exit the building or the contractor can vent them out the side of the home. Unless the existing chimney has a new heavy gauge metal liner in it I would suggest that any new (non-condensing) boiler utilizing normal chimney venting be in stalled with such a liner.

    If the gas company is really strict on the 6 month time line and won't issue a waiver to get you at least past the coming winter I would suggest you connect to the gas and use it for a gas kitchen range, all they are usually looking for is a connection to their service and "some" usage.
    Thank you, firecontrol for the great inputs. As far as zones, one is my main level (kitchen, living room, office, bathroom...all controlled by a NEST), one is 2 bedrooms and 1 bathroom upstairs (manual thermostat that I turn on before going to bed), and the last one is for the finished basement (manual thermostat that I rarely use, unless I have people staying over, workout, etc.)

    The 6-month just started last week. My goal is to switch right away so I can leverage the NG vs. OIL right away ... but absolutely, the stove would be my first choice if things go sideways with the heat and I have to start using the line.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •