Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    29
    Post Likes

    Typical hotel room hourly occupation profile

    Hello there,

    I'm doing a study on hotel's chiller sizing and I'm looking for a typical hotel room hourly occupation profile.

    That is:

    From all room that were sold, how many are actually occupied (guest is inside the room), for every hour of the day?

    Example:

    - 11a.m. = 20% (100 sold rooms / 20 rooms occupied)
    ....
    - 8 p.m. = 80% (100 sold rooms / 80 rooms occupied)

    Does anybody have this profile?

    Thank you all in advance

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Posts
    615
    Post Likes
    I’m curious what you hope to gain from this information.

    I don’t have the numbers that you are looking for but in my buildings we don’t control the unit based off of projected occupancy levels.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Quickly, I must hurry, for there go my people and I am their leader!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    29
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    It is for chiller (or any other type of central cooling) sizing and energy consumption analysis.

    If I find, for example, that at peak thermal load only 50% (according to occupational profile/schedule) of the rooms are actually occupied and AC on, I can reduce chiller size and increase combination ratio (in a design stage). Similarly, I can use this information for energy consumption.

  4. Likes thatguy liked this post
  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    167
    Post Likes
    The DOE website has all of the prototype buildings used to calculate energy savings of both ASHRAE 90.1 and IECC codes when they are updated. There is both a small and large hotel model. The EnergyPlus input files are included. Those input files will have occupancy schedules. I cannot say that they are perfect, but you cannot go too far wrong using them.

    https://www.energycodes.gov/developm...ototype_models

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    29
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Thank you very much for your feedback. That is exactly what i'm looking for.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold, NY
    Posts
    24,367
    Post Likes
    Another energy saver / equipment killer

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    29
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    If anyone has real data to compare with prototype models that would be very interesting.

    @Pecmsg, why is that?

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    167
    Post Likes
    I should have mentioned this at the same time that I gave you the DOE link:

    If your goal is to determine if your client can buy a smaller chiller plant, then you need to rethink that. For offices if you get that one day out of the year where your plant can't keep up, the owner can live with that. Hotels need to be sized to keep their clients comfortable with full occupancy on the worst day of the year. Everything might be great 364 days a year, but if they have one day where their guests are uncomfortable and they get a bunch of bad reviews it will cost them more than what you saved them. An engineering firm that designed this would likely be sued.

    Using a smaller plant also adds risk because you have less redundancy. Again, not a big deal if an office has to shut down one day over ten years because they lost a chiller. A much bigger problem for a hotel.

    I worked on the air side of the business for many years and supported a number of hotel projects including very large resorts. Their first, second, and third priority is client comfort. On my side of the business, they always put in fan coils 2X oversize for the peak load because it is important that rooms cool quickly.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Medford, N.Y.
    Posts
    5,848
    Post Likes
    As coolcoil said. What happens on "that" day/days when everybody stays in the rooms during a crazy heat wave?

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    29
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    I agree with you all about 1-day a/c out in an office compared to a hotel; crazy heat waves; redundancy etc!

    But my understanding is that each and every case is unique and lots of factors must be taken in account (including occupancy schedule) and if good reasons are found to support capacity reductions, why not? Hey, 1% reduction is still a reduction! I don't mean I want drop chiller plant capacity in half all day, but that's not impossible.

    It's a common practice here to size hotel central cooling plants with combination ratio above 100%.
    Question is - how much combination ratio? Occupancy schedule is one of many factors that helps answer this question.

    My company has several hotel maintenance contracts with oversized systems and lots of them needs retrofit. It's usual to see in summer at peak load and full occupation that only 50% of chiller capacity is being used. So instead of retrofitting with same chiller capacity, why not reduce capacity and make it cheaper for costumer?

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    167
    Post Likes
    Fair enough, as you have already-existing hotels that have a history as you describe. Your plans do make sense in this case.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sunny SoCal
    Posts
    314
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by lucaspenalva View Post
    If anyone has real data to compare with prototype models that would be very interesting.

    @Pecmsg, why is that?
    I think what's happining here is your conversing with Service techs not Engineers.
    Engineers get atta-boys for reducing an installations equipment needs & after completion of the project, never see it again.
    Whereas Service techs are tasked with working on said equipment until the end of its usefulness.
    Occasionally pulling a rabbit out of their hats on that worse case scenario day(s).

    So to recap, ask an Engineer & your get an answer of less then 100%.
    Ask a Service tech & your answer will be @ or above 100%
    Eric

  14. Likes thatguy liked this post
  15. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Posts
    615
    Post Likes
    I suspect what you will find is that the occupancy rates are different for various areas. I would expect that the profile in Vegas USA would be vastly different than the profile in Nova Scotia Canada. The night life, available activities, local business operating hours, among a host of other variables, would change that profile you are seeking. The difference could possibly even be vastly different simply by driving half a mile down the road. Change the walking distance, activities, or distance to cheep transportation and people will adapt and return to their rooms at different times. I just can’t see it being a constant.

    And the above post makes a good point. When you take away the redundancy you also take away our rabbit.

    I’m curious if when you preform these calculations if you are trying to reduce the redundancy of the system or remove it entirely.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Quickly, I must hurry, for there go my people and I am their leader!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •